GMAT Question of the Day (Jan 20): Probability and Sentence Correction

By - Jan 20, 02:00 AM Comments [0]

Math (PS)

Two sets are defined as follows:

A = {2, 3, 4, 4, 4}
B = {0, 1, 2}

If a number is taken from set A at random and another number is taken from set B at random, what is the probability that the sum of these numbers is a prime integer?

(A) \frac{1}{15}
(B) \frac{2}{15}
(C) \frac{5}{15}
(D) \frac{7}{15}
(E) \frac{9}{15}

OA and Explanation

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Verbal (SC)

People can debate the aesthetic merits of these overwrought, disquieting, sometimes gruesome works of art, but no one can dispute their creators’ mastery of the paintbrush as a blunt instrument.

(A) but no one can dispute their creators’ mastery of the paintbrush as a blunt instrument.
(B) but none can dispute their creators’ mastery of the paintbrush as a blunt instrument.
(C) but not a one can dispute their creators’ mastery of the paintbrush as a blunt instrument.
(D) but no person can dispute their creators’ mastery of the paintbrush as a blunt instrument.
(E) but none can dispute to their creators’ mastery of the paintbrush as a blunt instrument.

OA and Explanation

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