Idioms and Tenses Mixed Together

By - Jul 8, 19:38 PM Comments [0]

Q. Because the Supreme Court has ruled that the prosecution in a job discrimination case must prove not only that the employer lied about the reasons for dismissal but also that those reasons were discriminatory, plaintiffs in such cases fear that they will have no higher court that they can appeal to when their cases are decided in lower courts.

A) that they can appeal to when their cases are
B) to which to appeal after their cases have been
C) for appealing if their case has been
D) to which they can appeal if their case is
E) that their cases can appeal, if they have been

The word "that" isn't necessary here. The idiomatic structure "court that they can appeal to" is not preferred on the GMAT. But more telling is the last word in (A): "are" --present tense. You need to present the sentence in such a way that it's clear decisions are made in the lower courts and then afterwards there's some possibility of appeal with higher courts that is suggested in the sentence.

I wasn't so hot on "that" but I did like "to which" in answers (B) and (D).

I actually did not even read the first half of the sentence. I only started reading from the comma:
"plaintiffs in such cases fear that they will have no higher court that they can appeal to when their cases are decided in lower courts."

Between (B) and (D)---(B) uses "have been" while (D) uses "is"---not what we want.

So (B) is what we want. It correctly uses "to which" and also correctly uses "have been."

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