Verbal

Frequently Confused Words on the GMAT

By - Apr 18, 22:48 PM   Comments [1]

By Jen Rugani Certain words are very commonly confused for each other; this is by design. Here’s a core content piece you’d find in our course. The preposition among takes an object made up of more than two items, while the preposition between takes an object make up of exactly two items. We...

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GMAT Question of the Day (Apr 18): Algebra and Sentence Correction

By - Apr 18, 02:00 AM   Comments [0]

Math (PS) If function satisfies for all , which of the following must be true? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Question Discussion & Explanation Correct Answer - B - (click and drag your mouse to see the answer) GMAT Daily Deals Free GMAT Club tests(> 1,100 questions...

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GMAT SC: Wordy vs. Concise?

By - Apr 17, 09:00 AM   Comments [0]

Concision is a good thing on GMAT SC, but can you have too much of this good thing? As a general rule on GMAT Sentence Correction (and in life!), wordy is bad.  For example: 1) Buck Mulligan, who was a somewhat chubby person but who bore his weight with...

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GMAT Question of the Day (Apr 17): Coordinate Geometry and Critical Reasoning

By - Apr 17, 02:00 AM   Comments [0]

Math (PS) Which of the following points is not on the line ? (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) Question Discussion & Explanation Correct Answer - E - (click and drag your mouse to see the answer) GMAT Daily Deals Get $100 off a Manhattan GMAT course (and an...

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GMAT Question of the Day (Apr 16): Rate Problem and Critical Reasoning

By - Apr 16, 02:00 AM   Comments [0]

Math (DS) In the morning, John drove to his mother's house in the village at an average speed of 60 kmh. When he was going back to town in the evening, he drove more cautiously and his speed was lower. If John went the same distance...

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How to Weaken an Argument in GMAT Critical Reasoning

By - Apr 13, 09:00 AM   Comments [2]

More Than One Way Often the strongest ways to attack an argument is to undermine one of its pivotal assumptions: that’s something I discussed in this post:http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/arguments-and-assumptions-on-the-gmat/.  Other ways of attacking an argument include: a) questioning the evidence cited, and/or questioning the starting point b) showing argument leads...

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GMAT Question of the Day (Apr 13): Probability and Sentence Correction

By - Apr 13, 02:00 AM   Comments [0]

Math (DS) The bowl contains green and blue chips. What is the probability of drawing a blue chip in two successive trials if the chip drawn in the first trial is not returned to the bowl before the second trial? 1. The ratio of blue chips to...

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GMAT Question of the Day (Apr 12): Rate Problem and Sentence Correction

By - Apr 12, 02:00 AM   Comments [0]

Math (PS) The train consists of 6 carriages, 20 meters long each. The gap between the carriages is 1 meter. If the train is moving at a constant speed of 60 kmh, how much time will it take the train to run through a 1 kilometer...

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How to Tackle Analogous Situations in RC and CR

By - Apr 11, 14:52 PM   Comments [0]

By Jen Rugani Say a friend tells you a story about something that happened to her at work. Her boss has decided to assign her to a very specific research assignment, despite the fact that such research rarely yields practical results. Hearing this reminds you of...

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Assumptions: GMAT and Otherwise

By - Apr 11, 12:21 PM   Comments [0]

By Lucas Weingarten Sometimes you stumble upon something that is too full of coincidence to pass up.  Inc. recently published an online article that seems written with the GMAT in mind: Have you checked your assumptions lately? I have concluded that you’ll find this editorial particularly interesting because...

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