Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 17 Sep 2014, 01:33

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

3 years post MBA - a reflection

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 26 Mar 2008
Posts: 652
Schools: Duke 2012
Followers: 14

Kudos [?]: 114 [0], given: 16

GMAT Tests User
Re: 3 years post MBA - a reflection [#permalink] New post 24 Oct 2012, 18:29
PS: I still hold Rhyme in very high regard...if you are looking for objective & honest opinions, I think he will always give them. It's in his honor that I strive to give my atypical viewpoint for anyone that it helps :).
_________________

"Egotism is the anesthetic that dulls the pain of stupidity." - Frank Leahy

Get the best GMAT Prep Resources with GMAT Club Premium Membership

Current Student
avatar
Joined: 04 Oct 2011
Posts: 430
Concentration: Finance
GMAT 1: 700 Q44 V41
GMAT 2: 750 Q48 V46
GPA: 3.03
WE: Project Management (Military & Defense)
Followers: 11

Kudos [?]: 106 [0], given: 149

GMAT Tests User Premium Member
Re: 3 years post MBA - a reflection [#permalink] New post 25 Oct 2012, 05:41
Thanks for the great insight. I'm curious about the people who have already changed jobs since graduating. Do you see that more often in folks who were using the MBA to switch careers of is it in everybody? I'm a career switcher and while I have a number of reasons why I believe asset management is the right path for me I've never worked a day in finance. The closest I will get is my summer internship between years. So I can see how the career switching people might end up trying to get out of their first job after B School if they end up being wrong about their new path.
23 KUDOS received
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
avatar
Affiliations: HHonors Diamond, BGS Honor Society
Joined: 05 Apr 2006
Posts: 5925
Schools: Chicago (Booth) - Class of 2009
GMAT 1: 730 Q45 V45
WE: Business Development (Consumer Products)
Followers: 255

Kudos [?]: 1544 [23] , given: 7

GMAT Tests User Premium Member
Re: 3 years post MBA - a reflection [#permalink] New post 25 Oct 2012, 05:51
23
This post received
KUDOS
Quote:
Can you elaborate a bit on why or how people "pick wrong" as you alluded to in your second point? Did they pick wrong because they didn't do their homework, or is it more likely that you simply won't know whether a particular industry/function is a good fit for you until you try?


It's a combination of factors. Some people come in very good ideas of exactly what they want to do, and others, most I would argue, come in with a better understanding of what they don't want to do. Even among those who say they know what they want, often the reasons seem a bit superficial (money is usually a key motivator), and as any behavioral economist will tell you, money is a poor motivator. On top of that you layer a very intense microcosm of MBA life - 500 similar minded students all searching for the 'perfect job' - and its pretty easy to be swayed by the bright lights and the song and dance. Companies put a LOT of money and effort into recruiting people - they can make most any job sound glamorous. I don't think its an issue of not doing your homework, I think its an issue of perception vs reality. That's in part the beauty of the internship, you get to try before you buy - and one of the biggest reasons I think the FT program is better than a PT program (unless you plan on staying in industry/function). This is all a bit rambling but basically I think people pick wrong because they 1) Dont REALLY know what they want to do, 2) There's a tendency to pick from a small 'menu' of jobs (you can be a banker, a marketer or a consultant), 3) The idea of something is usually better than the reality of it.

Quote:
Can you also comment on your personal ROI on the MBA thus far? You don't have to use specifics of course, but when do you estimate you'll come out on top after accounting for 2 years of lost income and the b-school tuition expenses you shelled out?


My comp before MBA was basically 100K, so I wasn't going in with the expectation that I'd be leaving with some stellar ROI. (One friend was at 42,500 before school, and landed a gig at $127K right out - now THATS ROI!). I haven't a clue what my lost income, tuition and other crap added up to, but it was probably close to a $400K total including the opportunity cost. But I didnt go to grad school for money (well, in part money) - I went because I didnt want to do the same crap I had been doing before and knew an MBA was the most likely way to change job and function, without also taking a huge paycut to do it. This year, I'll be well ahead of where the graph below suggests I should be.

So, is the ROI there? Probably. Hard to say what I would have made if I hadn't gone to get an MBA. That said, I do know people who make less - a lot less in some cases - one girl I know spent a year looking for something and ended up at 90K. I know another guy who took a job offer 2 years out at total comp of $120K. I know another person who, far as I can tell, hasnt been able to get a job at all. Of course, there's a sampling bias problem here too - the only people who share their incomes are those who know they are doing well.... people don't generally offer up "Yo! I'm at 75K plus free coffee!"...

Theres also the real value of the intangibles -- getting to do something I do enjoy and having the network to call on .... I dont know how you value that, but its hard not to look at it and say its meaningful.

By the way, if you are curious what the averages look like - Image

and Image

From: http://faculty.chicagobooth.edu/mariann ... s_1209.pdf

Quote:
What would interest me: All things considered, would you answer "Was it worth it for you?" with yes or no?


Yes. Clearly. ROI and job and happiness etc. But its clear that not everyone feels the same way... Like I said, I've got that one friend who just cant understand how someone younger than him with a non-top tier MBA could possibly get promoted ahead of him - or god forbid - someone without an MBA. It drives him INSANE. He's categorically convinced he should be making $500K a year by now and thinks its absurd that the rest of his company hasn't realized that. He holds a HUGE grudge against booth and wouldn't be caught dead saying anything positive about his MBA.

Quote:
I'm interested to hear more about your classmates who found their own firms - whether most of them are sticking with their own firms because entrepreneurship was still the right thing for them three years down the road, or they are still struggling and do not have any other option.


I must admit im shocked that some of these firms have managed to stay alive. There are a few that don't surprise me at all - I was offered a chance to invest in one at graduation, and wanted to but just felt like it was going to be a lot of money. I wish I had. They just closed a KPCB investment a few months ago. Granted I'd be diluted to 0.000001% by now, but dang!!! Other companies I cant understand how they manage to stay in business - but honestly I dont know of a single company started out of Booth in my year thats folded. I'm not sure what to make of that - it can't be that every single one is successful... but the folks that started them were die hard passionate about it and I could see them eating ramen noodles just to keep the lights on.

Quote:
You mentioned that you have changed jobs - Do you think you're closer to your true calling? What advice would you give MBA aspirants to avoid #3, i.e. what to do and not to do during their studies and/or job search in order to find the individual's ideal post-MBA path?


I feel like I'm a lot closer to the ideal. If I could layer in a little international experience, I'd probably be completely in love. I got my MBA to leave my industry and go into general management with ideally, P&L responsibility. I've got that now, even if its not huge. I've got my direct reports and a slew of indirect reports, I've got strategy setting authority and get to drive my business line. At the end of each month I can see if what I'm doing is making more money or making us less - and I love being able to just pull up a report and say 'Yup, cool. Add another million to the AB!'. Bottom line, I have fun going to work, I make decent money and I work decent hours. Unless someone can find a way for me to do this job from a ski chalet or the beach, there's not a whole lot more I could ask for.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 05 Apr 2012
Posts: 39
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 6

Re: 3 years post MBA - a reflection [#permalink] New post 25 Oct 2012, 12:03
Thank you, rhyme. Awesome posts and insights.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 24 Mar 2010
Posts: 347
Followers: 7

Kudos [?]: 56 [0], given: 4

GMAT Tests User
Re: 3 years post MBA - a reflection [#permalink] New post 26 Oct 2012, 22:04
*EDITED*

Last edited by Shawshank on 19 Jan 2013, 14:00, edited 1 time in total.
BSchool Forum Moderator
User avatar
Status: Current Tuckie!
Joined: 19 Oct 2012
Posts: 505
Location: United Kingdom
Schools: Tuck '16 (M)
GMAT 1: 710 Q50 V36
GMAT 2: 740 Q48 V44
Followers: 22

Kudos [?]: 158 [0], given: 101

GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: 3 years post MBA - a reflection [#permalink] New post 27 Oct 2012, 01:25
Great post.
Could be argued that even though most guys are looking for ROI from their MBA that if they enjoyed and felt happy post-MBA (e.g. from the career change that otherwise would not have occurred) then that should be taken into account.
_________________

*Updated 25th July*: Embracing the downtime
Blog: http://domotron.wordpress.com

Elements of an MBA application series
GMAT (28/02) | Profile (11/03) | Networking / Research (01/04) | Recommendations (30/05) | Essays / Online applications | Interview

My 710 (Q50, V36) Debrief + 740 (Q48, V44) Update:
http://gmatclub.com/forum/710-q50-v36-phew-i-m-done-with-the-gmat-probably-150067.html

Please share your profiles for this application season below:
http://gmatclub.com/forum/2014-profiles-w-admit-dings-results-no-discussion-162160.html

2 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 28 Feb 2012
Posts: 32
Concentration: Strategy, Finance
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 11 [2] , given: 5

Re: 3 years post MBA - a reflection [#permalink] New post 01 Nov 2012, 02:38
2
This post received
KUDOS
First of all, thanks for the excellent thread to all those who have contributed. This thread, at the very least, makes me happy that I am not alone. I am planning to do a MBA and actually just got an interview invite from Rice PMBA program. I have been working in the US for last 8 years in Civil Engineering Consulting with an emphasis on Geotechnical Engineering. Those who know the industry may also know that this industry is ripe with archaic thinking. I have had a tough time in this industry partly because I speak my mind and partly because I get stereotyped (as a technical person). Under paid (with salary in early 60s - according to DOL, my salary should be close to $75K) and overworked (I pretty much take care of reports, proposals, laboratory testing, drilling, client interactions, project updates, etc.). While I do understand that there are areas for me to improve (mostly related to verbal communication), the discontent and the bitterness have taken their toll. There was a time when I was motivated and passionate about what I did. Now, I simply do it without really caring so much. Even though my current company is small with around 100 employees, the growth opportunities have been missing so far because of a control freak boss (who has the same amount of work experience as I do and who is my intellectual junior).

My short term reasons for doing MBA are apparently not the best - salary growth, better position, and possibly a career transition either into IT (I have 3 years of work experience in a top IT company in India) or into Civil Engineering (possibly a much bigger, international level company).

I would appreciate it if y' all can pour in...
1 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 03 Oct 2012
Posts: 17
GMAT 1: 730 Q47 V44
GPA: 3.54
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 10 [1] , given: 4

Re: 3 years post MBA - a reflection [#permalink] New post 06 Nov 2012, 07:43
1
This post received
KUDOS
These are some of the questions going through my head currently. Right now I like my job ok, it's a good company, albeit maybe a little boring. But I make close to $100K and I have 3 kids. While it's looking like I can get into a really good program, I still have the consideration of just letting my company pay for a part-time MBA at Ohio State. I have the hope that, while it would be a huge debt load, the MBA can propel me to greater responsibility at a fun and exciting company...yeah, the grass is always greener.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 05 Oct 2011
Posts: 169
GMAT 1: 720 Q V
Followers: 7

Kudos [?]: 34 [0], given: 60

GMAT ToolKit User GMAT Tests User Reviews Badge
Re: 3 years post MBA - a reflection [#permalink] New post 06 Nov 2012, 10:52
Great discussion.

Here is some perspective about MBA from a Stanford alum

http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/arti ... -be-an-mba
13 KUDOS received
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 10 Apr 2007
Posts: 4320
Location: Back in Chicago, IL
Schools: Kellogg Alum: Class of 2010
Followers: 78

Kudos [?]: 693 [13] , given: 5

GMAT Tests User
Re: 3 years post MBA - a reflection [#permalink] New post 07 Nov 2012, 11:29
13
This post received
KUDOS
My advice on the debate if getting an MBA or not will achieve what you want is think about what you want. Now imagine you spent 100k getting a degree, and don't get exactly that...are you able to still be happy or is it going to be the biggest disappointment in your life?

I tend to see my friends who aren't overly thrilled with getting an MBA from whatever big name school as having such a narrow goal and not achieving that made the degree a failure. Generally they can't admit it is them and/or their expectations that failed and not the school. Any top program will provide you with a great education, a network that will open some doors, and career opportunities aplenty. Not everyone that gets into Stanford gets a high profile VC gig, HBS isn't the golden ticket for everyone into a big name PE firm, Kellogg wont get you a marketing gig at the biggest name CPG's.

If you don't have the right background and want to make a major career shift, it may be doable depending on the function and industry, but requires a lot more of you. Just having the fancy degree wont get it done because you will be competing with people from lots of big name schools and some have a background that perfectly aligns with what companies want. Certain changes are much more realistic, so I have a lot of friends with no marketing background who landed offers from top companies in this area. But then friends who wanted to break into HF's struggled unless they worked at one pre-MBA or at a big name bank in the right functional area.

Another way to be happy is to set targets on what you will be earning and your ROI. I have friends who probably are making $5k before they graduated and then I know people who are up $75k (non-bankers). Now, some of the people who have the same basic income are extremely happy where they are at, while some people raking in the cash are still unhappy with their career choices. Are some people disappointed with only making $135k a few years out of school, sure, but you need to put that into perspective. Pretty much everyone who goes to a big name school is going to be in the top few percent of income earners, especially in their age range. It takes hanging out with my non-MBA friends to remind me just how warped our reality can become in regards to income. My wife and I will pay more in taxes this year than most of our friends we grew up with will earn in the entire year. My friends from Kellogg are now buying nice houses in the desirable zipcodes, driving nice new cars, have nanny's taking care of their kids, and of course going on ridiculous vacations.

Before committing, I suggest thinking about what is important to you and will make you feel like going to school was a great decision. Then conversely the what if scenario of what will make you feel like you failed. Now think of the likelihood of each of those, and should the failure be much more plausible then maybe it isn't for you. One of my friends who I know is making less than he did before Kellogg, is probably the single most satisfied person with where it got him. For him ROI didnt matter it was about wanting to switch into a niche area he was very passionate about.

Heck personal example, I went with the goal of going into the energy space coming out. Interned at an oil company, but decided that wasn't for me fulltime. Second year I accepted an offer at a manufacturing company, was there for a few years and now am switching to a tech company. I was huge on the energy area, as you may notice if you look through my old posts but for a variety of reasons never actually went into it. However, I could not be any happier with what my degree has gotten me. My income level is bordering on what a few years pre-MBA I would have viewed as obnoxiously high. Met some amazing friends, got to take part in a great couple of years, my wife's career has benefitted, and pretty much overall it worked out better than I hoped even though I definitely didn't achieve my original career goal.
_________________

Kellogg Class of 2010...still active and willing to help. However, I do not do profile reviews, don't offer predictions on chances and am far to busy to review essays, so save the energy of writing me a PM seeking help for these. If I don't respond to a PM that is not one of the previously mentioned trash can destined messages, please don't take it personally I get so many messages I have a hard to responding to most. The more interesting, compelling, or humorous you message the more likely I am to respond.
Get the best GMAT Prep Resources with GMAT Club Premium Membership

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 08 Sep 2009
Posts: 101
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 3

Re: 3 years post MBA - a reflection [#permalink] New post 07 Nov 2012, 15:27
I love this thread.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 06 Jul 2010
Posts: 75
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 37 [0], given: 12

GMAT Tests User
Re: 3 years post MBA - a reflection [#permalink] New post 07 Nov 2012, 16:14
OK, single best thread on GC. I have to go back and give Kudos! :)

Since I am still in College I have slightly different question. Many people tell me that consulting is the best way to groom one for a MBA, considering the diverse industries and the competitive environment. Can you give me any insights if consultants you know have been prepared particularly well for the MBA and have been more successful with Post-MBA job recruiting? Or do you think if I went into an industry position or even entrepreneurship after college, I would be equally well prepared and in a good position to find a job after a MBA?

Thanks for the insight! :)
Current Student
avatar
Joined: 04 Oct 2011
Posts: 430
Concentration: Finance
GMAT 1: 700 Q44 V41
GMAT 2: 750 Q48 V46
GPA: 3.03
WE: Project Management (Military & Defense)
Followers: 11

Kudos [?]: 106 [0], given: 149

GMAT Tests User Premium Member
Re: 3 years post MBA - a reflection [#permalink] New post 07 Nov 2012, 18:08
riverripper wrote:
My advice on the debate if getting an MBA or not will achieve what you want is think about what you want. Now imagine you spent 100k getting a degree, and don't get exactly that...are you able to still be happy or is it going to be the biggest disappointment in your life?

I tend to see my friends who aren't overly thrilled with getting an MBA from whatever big name school as having such a narrow goal and not achieving that made the degree a failure. Generally they can't admit it is them and/or their expectations that failed and not the school. Any top program will provide you with a great education, a network that will open some doors, and career opportunities aplenty. Not everyone that gets into Stanford gets a high profile VC gig, HBS isn't the golden ticket for everyone into a big name PE firm, Kellogg wont get you a marketing gig at the biggest name CPG's.

If you don't have the right background and want to make a major career shift, it may be doable depending on the function and industry, but requires a lot more of you. Just having the fancy degree wont get it done because you will be competing with people from lots of big name schools and some have a background that perfectly aligns with what companies want. Certain changes are much more realistic, so I have a lot of friends with no marketing background who landed offers from top companies in this area. But then friends who wanted to break into HF's struggled unless they worked at one pre-MBA or at a big name bank in the right functional area.

Another way to be happy is to set targets on what you will be earning and your ROI. I have friends who probably are making $5k before they graduated and then I know people who are up $75k (non-bankers). Now, some of the people who have the same basic income are extremely happy where they are at, while some people raking in the cash are still unhappy with their career choices. Are some people disappointed with only making $135k a few years out of school, sure, but you need to put that into perspective. Pretty much everyone who goes to a big name school is going to be in the top few percent of income earners, especially in their age range. It takes hanging out with my non-MBA friends to remind me just how warped our reality can become in regards to income. My wife and I will pay more in taxes this year than most of our friends we grew up with will earn in the entire year. My friends from Kellogg are now buying nice houses in the desirable zipcodes, driving nice new cars, have nanny's taking care of their kids, and of course going on ridiculous vacations.

Before committing, I suggest thinking about what is important to you and will make you feel like going to school was a great decision. Then conversely the what if scenario of what will make you feel like you failed. Now think of the likelihood of each of those, and should the failure be much more plausible then maybe it isn't for you. One of my friends who I know is making less than he did before Kellogg, is probably the single most satisfied person with where it got him. For him ROI didnt matter it was about wanting to switch into a niche area he was very passionate about.

Heck personal example, I went with the goal of going into the energy space coming out. Interned at an oil company, but decided that wasn't for me fulltime. Second year I accepted an offer at a manufacturing company, was there for a few years and now am switching to a tech company. I was huge on the energy area, as you may notice if you look through my old posts but for a variety of reasons never actually went into it. However, I could not be any happier with what my degree has gotten me. My income level is bordering on what a few years pre-MBA I would have viewed as obnoxiously high. Met some amazing friends, got to take part in a great couple of years, my wife's career has benefitted, and pretty much overall it worked out better than I hoped even though I definitely didn't achieve my original career goal.


Great post. As a career switcher this is why I have a dream job path and a backup (read: realistic) career plan.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 24 Sep 2012
Posts: 1
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 7

Re: 3 years post MBA - a reflection [#permalink] New post 07 Nov 2012, 18:44
Much needed post. Thank for providing us with your insight. I'm sure that I am not the only one struggling to make the right choice. Thanks again!! Kudos!
1 KUDOS received
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 10 Apr 2007
Posts: 4320
Location: Back in Chicago, IL
Schools: Kellogg Alum: Class of 2010
Followers: 78

Kudos [?]: 693 [1] , given: 5

GMAT Tests User
Re: 3 years post MBA - a reflection [#permalink] New post 07 Nov 2012, 21:01
1
This post received
KUDOS
heyholetsgo wrote:
OK, single best thread on GC. I have to go back and give Kudos! :)

Since I am still in College I have slightly different question. Many people tell me that consulting is the best way to groom one for a MBA, considering the diverse industries and the competitive environment. Can you give me any insights if consultants you know have been prepared particularly well for the MBA and have been more successful with Post-MBA job recruiting? Or do you think if I went into an industry position or even entrepreneurship after college, I would be equally well prepared and in a good position to find a job after a MBA?

Thanks for the insight! :)


Going into consulting just because it is going to groom you for an MBA is a surefire way to disappointment. Why would you do something that may make you miserable for 2-4 years? Then what happens if you are a consultant for several years and fail to get into your dream schools...all that planning for naught. Consultants make up a large number of the applicants, and schools desire diversity, so not every consultant goes to top 5 schools. Follow your passion, and see where the road will take you. I went for function over industry and definitely couldn't be happier in that.

Consulting certainly helps recruit in certain areas, but so many of your classmates were consultants that it does not separate you from the pack. If you want to be in a given field and in a given functional area my advice is go into it right out of undergrad. Generally that will better position you for long term success in the field than a few years of consulting will. I know plenty of people who joined consulting and couldn't get out of it fast enough post MBA. They got the same jobs that plenty of folks who didn't go into consulting got, so read into that what you want.

Most consultants go back into consulting for a few years to get their degree paid for or because it is what they know and it generally is on the higher side of the pay scale. The irony is that typically consulting seems to have the lowest satisfaction rate.
_________________

Kellogg Class of 2010...still active and willing to help. However, I do not do profile reviews, don't offer predictions on chances and am far to busy to review essays, so save the energy of writing me a PM seeking help for these. If I don't respond to a PM that is not one of the previously mentioned trash can destined messages, please don't take it personally I get so many messages I have a hard to responding to most. The more interesting, compelling, or humorous you message the more likely I am to respond.
Get the best GMAT Prep Resources with GMAT Club Premium Membership

1 KUDOS received
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
avatar
Affiliations: HHonors Diamond, BGS Honor Society
Joined: 05 Apr 2006
Posts: 5925
Schools: Chicago (Booth) - Class of 2009
GMAT 1: 730 Q45 V45
WE: Business Development (Consumer Products)
Followers: 255

Kudos [?]: 1544 [1] , given: 7

GMAT Tests User Premium Member
Re: 3 years post MBA - a reflection [#permalink] New post 19 Jan 2013, 13:43
1
This post received
KUDOS
I thought I'd add to the "dumb luck" component of how people have fared. January is always an interesting month because you get the 100 "LinkedIn" updates from your classmates. Seems like a lot of "Associates" are now "VP" at banks. A lot of "Consultants" are now "Engagement Managers". I took some time to peruse through and its intriguing - a few folks have done really really well, others seem to be stuck. It's such a curious dynamic to see who has been promoted 3x in 3 years and who hasn't had a single promotion - or just made lateral moves across firms.
I guess I dont have a point here, other than to re-iterate that an MBA will open doors, but what happens after that is up to you.

Oh and, best of all, I underestimated my income for this coming year!
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 24 Mar 2010
Posts: 347
Followers: 7

Kudos [?]: 56 [0], given: 4

GMAT Tests User
Re: 3 years post MBA - a reflection [#permalink] New post 19 Jan 2013, 14:02
rhyme wrote:
I thought I'd add to the "dumb luck" component of how people have fared. January is always an interesting month because you get the 100 "LinkedIn" updates from your classmates. Seems like a lot of "Associates" are now "VP" at banks. A lot of "Consultants" are now "Engagement Managers". I took some time to peruse through and its intriguing - a few folks have done really really well, others seem to be stuck. It's such a curious dynamic to see who has been promoted 3x in 3 years and who hasn't had a single promotion - or just made lateral moves across firms.
I guess I dont have a point here, other than to re-iterate that an MBA will open doors, but what happens after that is up to you.

Oh and, best of all, I underestimated my income for this coming year!


Interesting. Were the people who got promoted multiple times the ones who stood out while you were in class with them? I wonder if there's any correlation between how hard they worked in b-school and their subsequent professional performance.

Thanks so much for your insightful posts.
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
avatar
Affiliations: HHonors Diamond, BGS Honor Society
Joined: 05 Apr 2006
Posts: 5925
Schools: Chicago (Booth) - Class of 2009
GMAT 1: 730 Q45 V45
WE: Business Development (Consumer Products)
Followers: 255

Kudos [?]: 1544 [0], given: 7

GMAT Tests User Premium Member
Re: 3 years post MBA - a reflection [#permalink] New post 20 Jan 2013, 17:52
Shawshank wrote:
rhyme wrote:
I thought I'd add to the "dumb luck" component of how people have fared. January is always an interesting month because you get the 100 "LinkedIn" updates from your classmates. Seems like a lot of "Associates" are now "VP" at banks. A lot of "Consultants" are now "Engagement Managers". I took some time to peruse through and its intriguing - a few folks have done really really well, others seem to be stuck. It's such a curious dynamic to see who has been promoted 3x in 3 years and who hasn't had a single promotion - or just made lateral moves across firms.
I guess I dont have a point here, other than to re-iterate that an MBA will open doors, but what happens after that is up to you.

Oh and, best of all, I underestimated my income for this coming year!


Interesting. Were the people who got promoted multiple times the ones who stood out while you were in class with them? I wonder if there's any correlation between how hard they worked in b-school and their subsequent professional performance.

Thanks so much for your insightful posts.


You know, you'd think there's be more correlation.... it really is a random walk (poor pun).
Current Student
avatar
Joined: 22 Mar 2012
Posts: 87
Location: United States (NY)
Concentration: General Management, Marketing
GMAT 1: Q V
GPA: 3.1
WE: Accounting (Other)
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 27

Re: 3 years post MBA - a reflection [#permalink] New post 20 Aug 2013, 15:48
This was such a good post, so I'm bumping it up! Hope to get some other people's post-MBA reflections.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 10 Dec 2008
Posts: 484
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 760 Q49 V44
GPA: 3.9
Followers: 29

Kudos [?]: 119 [0], given: 12

GMAT Tests User
Re: 3 years post MBA - a reflection [#permalink] New post 20 Aug 2013, 20:08
Just read this post and found the perspective amazingly refreshing. Kudos and hope all is well!
Re: 3 years post MBA - a reflection   [#permalink] 20 Aug 2013, 20:08
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
Post Military MBA entering at 33+ 9years WE ankitarihaan 3 05 Jul 2014, 23:59
Experts publish their posts in the topic MBA for a 3 years of IT experience professional anuj4ufriends 1 24 May 2013, 18:15
Experts publish their posts in the topic Harvard: The Post-Interview Reflection myEssayReview 0 22 Jul 2012, 09:03
1 How Much Compensation Three Years Post-MBA? johnnyx9 22 23 Apr 2007, 06:40
How Much Money Three Years Post-MBA? johnnyx9 5 08 Mar 2007, 18:19
Display posts from previous: Sort by

3 years post MBA - a reflection

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Go to page   Previous    1   2   3    Next  [ 41 posts ] 



GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.