Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 30 Jul 2015, 10:27
GMAT Club Tests

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Expert Post
Math Expert
User avatar
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 28780
Followers: 4588

Kudos [?]: 47330 [0], given: 7121

Re: 3 red marbles and 7 blue marbles [#permalink] New post 07 Mar 2012, 16:10
Expert's post
rohitgoel15 wrote:
A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue marbles. If three marbles are selected at random, what is the probability that at least two marbles are blue?
Case 1: Only 2 marbles are blue. Prob: 7/10 * 6/9 * 3/8
Case 2: All 3 marbles are blue. Prob: 7/10 * 6/9 * 5/8
Add 1 and 2


The point is that BBR case can occur in 3 different ways: BBR, BRB, and RBB. So you should multiply 7/10 * 6/9 * 3/8 by 3.

This is discussed here: a-bag-of-10-marbles-contains-3-red-marbles-and-7-blue-56728.html#p677059 and here: a-bag-of-10-marbles-contains-3-red-marbles-and-7-blue-56728.html#p677083
_________________

NEW TO MATH FORUM? PLEASE READ THIS: ALL YOU NEED FOR QUANT!!!

PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

RESOURCES: [GMAT MATH BOOK]; 1. Triangles; 2. Polygons; 3. Coordinate Geometry; 4. Factorials; 5. Circles; 6. Number Theory; 7. Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets; 9. PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders; 11. GMAT Prep Software Analysis ; 12. SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) ; 12. Tricky questions from previous years.

COLLECTION OF QUESTIONS:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS ; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
25 extra-hard Quant Tests

GMAT Club Premium Membership - big benefits and savings

Kaplan GMAT Prep Discount CodesKnewton GMAT Discount CodesManhattan GMAT Discount Codes
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 07 Nov 2009
Posts: 313
Followers: 6

Kudos [?]: 218 [0], given: 20

Re: A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue [#permalink] New post 07 Mar 2012, 23:02
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
Owsum Bunuel ... Thanks !
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 19 Oct 2010
Posts: 273
Location: India
GMAT 1: 560 Q36 V31
GPA: 3
Followers: 6

Kudos [?]: 49 [0], given: 27

GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Combinatorics - at least, none .... [#permalink] New post 01 Apr 2013, 08:51
Bunuel wrote:
Bullet wrote:
Thanks Bunuel. I posted the solution from the thread as i was confused with the solution.

So what you're saying is that we need to multiply the permutations with the probability. Having said that we will do only when we need to choose at least two marbles or any other thing from the whole?

Thanks


To make it simple: suppose we have the jar of 10 marbles - 5 red, 2 blue and 3 green. If five marbles are selected at random, what is the probability that two will be red, one blue and two green?

We are looking for all the cases with 2R, 1B and 2G. We can draw these marbles like: RRBGG or GGBRR or RBGGR ... So how many combinations of the drawing of these marbles are there? The answer is as many as there is permutation of the letters GGBRR, which is \(\frac{5!}{2!2!}\).

Hence the answer for the above question would be \(\frac{5!}{2!2!}*\frac{5}{10}*\frac{4}{9}*\frac{2}{8}*\frac{3}{7}*\frac{2}{6}\).

If the question were: three marbles are selected at random, what is the probability that all three will be red?

RRR can occur only in one way: RRR, so the probability would be \(\frac{5}{10}*\frac{4}{9}*\frac{3}{8}\).

You can check the Probability and Combination chapters in the Math Book (link below) for more.
Also check my posts at:
probability-colored-balls-55253.html#p637525
4-red-chips-and-2-blue-chips-85987.html#p644603
probability-qs-attention-88945.html#p671958
p-c-88431.html?highlight=probability+of+occurring+event
probability-88069.html?highlight=probability+of+occurring+event
combination-problem-princenten-review-2009-bin-4-q2-87673.html?highlight=probability+of+occurring+event


That was an awesome explanation. Thank you!
_________________

petrifiedbutstanding

SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 06 Sep 2013
Posts: 2046
Concentration: Finance
GMAT 1: 770 Q0 V
Followers: 30

Kudos [?]: 322 [0], given: 355

GMAT ToolKit User
Re: A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue [#permalink] New post 08 Feb 2014, 13:21
bmwhype2 wrote:
1. A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue marbles. If two marbles are selected at random, what is the probability that at least one marble is blue?

2. A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue marbles. If two marbles are selected at random, what is the probability that none is blue?

3. A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue marbles. If three marbles are selected at random, what is the probability that at least two marbles are blue?

4. A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue marbles. If three marbles are selected at random, what is the probability that two marbles are blue?


In number 4 we need to specify that probability of EXACTLY two marbles are blue. Otherwise it would be the same as 3 no?

Just wondering
Cheers
J
Expert Post
Math Expert
User avatar
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 28780
Followers: 4588

Kudos [?]: 47330 [0], given: 7121

Re: A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue [#permalink] New post 09 Feb 2014, 00:32
Expert's post
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
jlgdr wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
1. A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue marbles. If two marbles are selected at random, what is the probability that at least one marble is blue?

2. A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue marbles. If two marbles are selected at random, what is the probability that none is blue?

3. A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue marbles. If three marbles are selected at random, what is the probability that at least two marbles are blue?

4. A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue marbles. If three marbles are selected at random, what is the probability that two marbles are blue?


In number 4 we need to specify that probability of EXACTLY two marbles are blue. Otherwise it would be the same as 3 no?

Just wondering
Cheers
J


No. If it meant at least two, then it would be written that way.
_________________

NEW TO MATH FORUM? PLEASE READ THIS: ALL YOU NEED FOR QUANT!!!

PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

RESOURCES: [GMAT MATH BOOK]; 1. Triangles; 2. Polygons; 3. Coordinate Geometry; 4. Factorials; 5. Circles; 6. Number Theory; 7. Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets; 9. PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders; 11. GMAT Prep Software Analysis ; 12. SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) ; 12. Tricky questions from previous years.

COLLECTION OF QUESTIONS:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS ; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
25 extra-hard Quant Tests

GMAT Club Premium Membership - big benefits and savings

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 15 Aug 2013
Posts: 331
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 25 [0], given: 23

Re: Combinatorics - at least, none .... [#permalink] New post 20 Apr 2014, 14:05
Bunuel wrote:
We are looking for all the cases with 2R, 1B and 2G. We can draw these marbles like: RRBGG or GGBRR or RBGGR ... So how many combinations of the drawing of these marbles are there? The answer is as many as there is permutation of the letters GGBRR, which is \(\frac{5!}{2!2!}\).

RRR can occur only in one way: RRR, so the probability would be \frac{5}{10}*\frac{4}{9}*\frac{3}{8}.




Can someone please talk about this a little? I understand that the marbles can be arranged in various ways RBRGG etc. but how do we come up with the \(\frac{5!}{2!2!}\) equation?

EDIT: To add to the question above, why can RRR only occur in one way, isn't that 3 separate ways as well? Meaning, R_1, R_2, R3 -- there are 3 different R's and therefore 3 different ways?
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 12 May 2013
Posts: 84
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 27 [0], given: 12

Re: Combinatorics - at least, none .... [#permalink] New post 21 Apr 2014, 00:48
Bunuel wrote:
Bullet wrote:
Can any body please explain Question No.3 using probability

Why we need to add twice
7/10*6/9*3/8 + 7/10*6/9*5/8 = 7/15

Thanks and appreciated


The solution you are posting for the third question is not right. Below is the solution of this question using the "probability".

3. A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue marbles. If three marbles are selected at random, what is the probability that at least two marbles are blue?

Probability of at least two marble are blue is the sum of the two probabilities:

A. Two marbles are blue and one is red - BBR. This can occur in \(\frac{3!}{2!}=3\) # of ways, which is basically the # of permutations of three letters B, B, and R: BBR, BRB, RBB. \(3*\frac{7}{10}*\frac{6}{9}*\frac{3}{8}\);

B. All three marbles are blue - BBB. This can occur only one way, namely BBB. \(\frac{7}{10}*\frac{6}{9}*\frac{5}{8}\)

So \(P=3*\frac{7}{10}*\frac{6}{9}*\frac{3}{8}+\frac{7}{10}*\frac{6}{9}*\frac{5}{8}=\frac{49}{60}\)


Bunuel, i just have 1 silly question, here why cant we do: 3!/2!*0.7^2*0.3 , i mean it is not specified in the question whether we replace the ball after selecting it
i get confused in such situations, a lot !
Expert Post
Math Expert
User avatar
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 28780
Followers: 4588

Kudos [?]: 47330 [0], given: 7121

Re: Combinatorics - at least, none .... [#permalink] New post 21 Apr 2014, 01:05
Expert's post
adymehta29 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
Bullet wrote:
Can any body please explain Question No.3 using probability

Why we need to add twice
7/10*6/9*3/8 + 7/10*6/9*5/8 = 7/15

Thanks and appreciated


The solution you are posting for the third question is not right. Below is the solution of this question using the "probability".

3. A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue marbles. If three marbles are selected at random, what is the probability that at least two marbles are blue?

Probability of at least two marble are blue is the sum of the two probabilities:

A. Two marbles are blue and one is red - BBR. This can occur in \(\frac{3!}{2!}=3\) # of ways, which is basically the # of permutations of three letters B, B, and R: BBR, BRB, RBB. \(3*\frac{7}{10}*\frac{6}{9}*\frac{3}{8}\);

B. All three marbles are blue - BBB. This can occur only one way, namely BBB. \(\frac{7}{10}*\frac{6}{9}*\frac{5}{8}\)

So \(P=3*\frac{7}{10}*\frac{6}{9}*\frac{3}{8}+\frac{7}{10}*\frac{6}{9}*\frac{5}{8}=\frac{49}{60}\)


Bunuel, i just have 1 silly question, here why cant we do: 3!/2!*0.7^2*0.3 , i mean it is not specified in the question whether we replace the ball after selecting it
i get confused in such situations, a lot !


If it were with replacement it would be specified. Or let me put it this way: proper GMAT question would make it clear whether it's with or without replacement case.
_________________

NEW TO MATH FORUM? PLEASE READ THIS: ALL YOU NEED FOR QUANT!!!

PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

RESOURCES: [GMAT MATH BOOK]; 1. Triangles; 2. Polygons; 3. Coordinate Geometry; 4. Factorials; 5. Circles; 6. Number Theory; 7. Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets; 9. PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders; 11. GMAT Prep Software Analysis ; 12. SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) ; 12. Tricky questions from previous years.

COLLECTION OF QUESTIONS:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS ; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
25 extra-hard Quant Tests

GMAT Club Premium Membership - big benefits and savings

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 15 Aug 2013
Posts: 331
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 25 [0], given: 23

Re: A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue [#permalink] New post 21 Apr 2014, 17:21
Thanks Bunuel, very clear!

That leads me to my second question -- sorry it's a little long winded.

When we solve this using probability, let's take question 3 for example(10 Marbles, 3R, 7B, if 3 are selected what is the prob that at least 2 will be blue). Following that, if I use probability, it is clear that the solution is P(BBR)+P(BRB)+P(RBB)+P(BBB).

On the other hand, if we use combinatorics, according to the solutions posted above, why aren't permutations taken into account. What I mean by that is, the correct solution is (7C2 x 3C1 + 7C3)/10C3 which implies that it's BBR OR BBB. Why are we ignoring BRB and RBB -- shouldn't it be ((7C2 x 3C1)3) + 7C3)/10C3?
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Status: The Final Countdown
Joined: 07 Mar 2013
Posts: 88
Concentration: International Business, General Management
GMAT 1: 710 Q47 V41
GPA: 3.84
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 4 [0], given: 292

CAT Tests
Re: A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2014, 23:43
In a similar question.

In a blue jar there are red, white and green balls. The probability of drawing a red ball is 1/5. The probability of drawing a red ball, returning it, and then drawing a white ball is 1/10. What is the probability of drawing a white ball?

a) 1/5.
b) ½.
c) 1/3.
d) 3/10.
e) ¼.


the OA is 1/2..which is just 1/10=1/5*x,so x=1/2..
my question is that returning the ball does not figure into the question in anyway?
Expert Post
Math Expert
User avatar
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 28780
Followers: 4588

Kudos [?]: 47330 [0], given: 7121

Re: A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue [#permalink] New post 30 Nov 2014, 04:33
Expert's post
Ralphcuisak wrote:
In a similar question.

In a blue jar there are red, white and green balls. The probability of drawing a red ball is 1/5. The probability of drawing a red ball, returning it, and then drawing a white ball is 1/10. What is the probability of drawing a white ball?

a) 1/5.
b) ½.
c) 1/3.
d) 3/10.
e) ¼.


the OA is 1/2..which is just 1/10=1/5*x,so x=1/2..
my question is that returning the ball does not figure into the question in anyway?


The probability of drawing a red ball is 1/5: P = (red)/(total) = 1/5;
The probability of drawing a red ball, returning it, and then drawing a white ball is 1/10: (red)/(total)*(white)/(total) = 1/10.

Since (red)/(total) = 1/5, then 1/5*(white)/(total) = 1/10 --> (white)/(total) = 1/2.

Answer: B.

Hope it's clear.
_________________

NEW TO MATH FORUM? PLEASE READ THIS: ALL YOU NEED FOR QUANT!!!

PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

RESOURCES: [GMAT MATH BOOK]; 1. Triangles; 2. Polygons; 3. Coordinate Geometry; 4. Factorials; 5. Circles; 6. Number Theory; 7. Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets; 9. PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders; 11. GMAT Prep Software Analysis ; 12. SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) ; 12. Tricky questions from previous years.

COLLECTION OF QUESTIONS:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS ; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
25 extra-hard Quant Tests

GMAT Club Premium Membership - big benefits and savings

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 20 Dec 2014
Posts: 14
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 20

Re: A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue [#permalink] New post 12 Mar 2015, 08:04
nevergiveup wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
1. A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue marbles. If two marbles are selected at random, what is the probability that at least one marble is blue?

1- [3!/(2!1!)]/[10!/(2!8!)]=14/15

2. A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue marbles. If two marbles are selected at random, what is the probability that none is blue?

[3!/(2!1!)]/[10!/(2!8!)]=1/15


3. A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue marbles. If two marbles are selected at random, what is the probability that at least two marbles are blue?

[7!/(2!5!)]/[10!/(2!8!)]=7/15

4. A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue marbles. If two marbles are selected at random, what is the probability that two marbles are blue?

[7!/(2!5!)]/[10!/(2!8!)]=7/15


Personally, I really don't know what is the difference between question 3 & 4.

Having trouble with this. For the first question the way that I am attempting to reason through it is 10!/2!8! . 2! represents the 2 marbles selected and 8! is for the other 8 NOT selected. I then have probability first one is not blue ,3/10, times this and answer subtracted from 1. So 1- [10!/2!/8!(3/10)] :x
Verbal Forum Moderator
Verbal Forum Moderator
avatar
Joined: 02 Aug 2009
Posts: 1230
Followers: 27

Kudos [?]: 502 [0], given: 19

Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue [#permalink] New post 12 Mar 2015, 08:12
GMAT01 wrote:
nevergiveup wrote:
bmwhype2 wrote:
1. A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue marbles. If two marbles are selected at random, what is the probability that at least one marble is blue?

1- [3!/(2!1!)]/[10!/(2!8!)]=14/15

2. A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue marbles. If two marbles are selected at random, what is the probability that none is blue?

[3!/(2!1!)]/[10!/(2!8!)]=1/15


3. A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue marbles. If two marbles are selected at random, what is the probability that at least two marbles are blue?

[7!/(2!5!)]/[10!/(2!8!)]=7/15

4. A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue marbles. If two marbles are selected at random, what is the probability that two marbles are blue?

[7!/(2!5!)]/[10!/(2!8!)]=7/15


Personally, I really don't know what is the difference between question 3 & 4.

Having trouble with this. For the first question the way that I am attempting to reason through it is 10!/2!8! . 2! represents the 2 marbles selected and 8! is for the other 8 NOT selected. I then have probability first one is not blue ,3/10, times this and answer subtracted from 1. So 1- [10!/2!/8!(3/10)] :x


hi GMAT01,
you do not require the coloured portion above...
wherever the questions of this form are there , the best is to take probability none is there and it seems you begun that way but went wrong mid way..
prob of both not being blue means both are red..
prob of first red=3/10 and second red=2/9.....
prob of both red 3/10*2/9=6/90..
so prob of atleast one blue=1-6/90=84/90...
hope its clear
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 20 Dec 2014
Posts: 14
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 20

Re: A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue [#permalink] New post 12 Mar 2015, 09:34
Chetan2u thank you for clarifying - I get it now. I was just confusing myself trying to approach this through combinatorics. I just made the problem more complex for me to understand instead of sticking to a simple method.
Re: A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue   [#permalink] 12 Mar 2015, 09:34

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 34 posts ] 

    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
18 Experts publish their posts in the topic Bag A contains red, white and blue marbles such that the red vigneshpandi 11 08 Sep 2010, 19:56
14 Experts publish their posts in the topic Bag A contains red, white and blue marbles such that the red dred 30 29 Jun 2007, 14:38
5 Experts publish their posts in the topic Bag A contains red, white and blue marbles such that the red to white rajesh04 8 01 Jul 2008, 10:25
Experts publish their posts in the topic Five marbles are in a bag: two are red and three are blue. young_gun 14 03 Dec 2007, 12:12
8 Experts publish their posts in the topic A basket contains 3 blue, 3 red and 3 yellow marbles. If 3 bmwhype2 17 16 Nov 2007, 06:46
Display posts from previous: Sort by

A bag of 10 marbles contains 3 red marbles and 7 blue

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.