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A diagram has exactly two black dots and one green dot for

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SVP
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Joined: 30 Apr 2008
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Schools: Hard Knocks
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A diagram has exactly two black dots and one green dot for [#permalink] New post 15 May 2008, 14:11
A diagram has exactly two black dots and one green dot for every two red dots. There are no dots of any other color in the diagram. Which one of the following could be the number of dots in the diagram?

A) 3
B) 18
C) 36
D) 45
E) 52

Please let me know what you think the answer is and in a bit I'll write what the book says the answer is.
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J Allen Morris
**I'm pretty sure I'm right, but then again, I'm just a guy with his head up his a$$.

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Director
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Re: Problem Solving Error in this question? [#permalink] New post 15 May 2008, 14:21
the lowest common ratio is 2:1:2 (b:g:r)

therefore a total of 5. thus only D, which is a multiple of 5, satisfies the condition imposed by this ratio.
SVP
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Re: Problem Solving Error in this question? [#permalink] New post 16 May 2008, 04:18
buffdaddy wrote:
the lowest common ratio is 2:1:2 (b:g:r)

therefore a total of 5. thus only D, which is a multiple of 5, satisfies the condition imposed by this ratio.


What do you think it means "there are exactly 2 black dots"? I took that to mean there are 2 black dots regardless of the number of green and red dots. If it doesn't mean that, then the word "exactly" doesn't really have any meaning in the question. My take on this is that it is a very simple question, worded very badly. It seems to me that if there were exactly 2 black dots, then there would be 2 black dots. If 45 is a possibility, then there would be 18 black dots (9 units of 5 dots = 45, so 2 black dots per 'unit' x 9 = 18 black dots). If, when there are 45 dots, you have 18 black dots, how can that be "exactly" 2 black dots?
_________________

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J Allen Morris
**I'm pretty sure I'm right, but then again, I'm just a guy with his head up his a$$.

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Director
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Joined: 14 Oct 2007
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Location: Oxford
Schools: Oxford'10
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Kudos [?]: 179 [0], given: 8

Re: Problem Solving Error in this question? [#permalink] New post 16 May 2008, 12:20
jallenmorris wrote:
buffdaddy wrote:
the lowest common ratio is 2:1:2 (b:g:r)

therefore a total of 5. thus only D, which is a multiple of 5, satisfies the condition imposed by this ratio.


What do you think it means "there are exactly 2 black dots"? I took that to mean there are 2 black dots regardless of the number of green and red dots. If it doesn't mean that, then the word "exactly" doesn't really have any meaning in the question. My take on this is that it is a very simple question, worded very badly. It seems to me that if there were exactly 2 black dots, then there would be 2 black dots. If 45 is a possibility, then there would be 18 black dots (9 units of 5 dots = 45, so 2 black dots per 'unit' x 9 = 18 black dots). If, when there are 45 dots, you have 18 black dots, how can that be "exactly" 2 black dots?


instead of reading "exactly two black dots" i think it reads "exactly two black dots and one green dot for every 2 red dots", ie the question without doubt says that the ratio is 2:1:2
SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 30 Apr 2008
Posts: 1893
Location: Oklahoma City
Schools: Hard Knocks
Followers: 32

Kudos [?]: 445 [0], given: 32

Re: Problem Solving Error in this question? [#permalink] New post 16 May 2008, 12:34
I have a tendancy to overcomplicate it. From my legal training its been pounded into me that if a word is there, it means something and it can't be ignored. That gets me into trouble on the Quant stuff. Actually helps with RC and CR on verbal.

Jarod

buffdaddy wrote:
jallenmorris wrote:
buffdaddy wrote:
the lowest common ratio is 2:1:2 (b:g:r)

therefore a total of 5. thus only D, which is a multiple of 5, satisfies the condition imposed by this ratio.


What do you think it means "there are exactly 2 black dots"? I took that to mean there are 2 black dots regardless of the number of green and red dots. If it doesn't mean that, then the word "exactly" doesn't really have any meaning in the question. My take on this is that it is a very simple question, worded very badly. It seems to me that if there were exactly 2 black dots, then there would be 2 black dots. If 45 is a possibility, then there would be 18 black dots (9 units of 5 dots = 45, so 2 black dots per 'unit' x 9 = 18 black dots). If, when there are 45 dots, you have 18 black dots, how can that be "exactly" 2 black dots?


instead of reading "exactly two black dots" i think it reads "exactly two black dots and one green dot for every 2 red dots", ie the question without doubt says that the ratio is 2:1:2

_________________

------------------------------------
J Allen Morris
**I'm pretty sure I'm right, but then again, I'm just a guy with his head up his a$$.

Take a Survey about GMAT Prep - Win Prizes!

Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 14 Oct 2007
Posts: 759
Location: Oxford
Schools: Oxford'10
Followers: 13

Kudos [?]: 179 [0], given: 8

Re: Problem Solving Error in this question? [#permalink] New post 17 May 2008, 03:06
i wish i had a legal background.

verbal must be easy for you. And trust me, applying to business schools with be a whole lot easier with a Legal background.
SVP
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User avatar
Joined: 30 Apr 2008
Posts: 1893
Location: Oklahoma City
Schools: Hard Knocks
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Kudos [?]: 445 [0], given: 32

Re: Problem Solving Error in this question? [#permalink] New post 17 May 2008, 06:21
buffdaddy wrote:
i wish i had a legal background.

verbal must be easy for you. And trust me, applying to business schools with be a whole lot easier with a Legal background.



I hope so. I passed the bar exam here in Oklahoma the first time. By getting through law school, I would hope that will lessen the fact that I had a 3.05 UGPA in History. If I had more time, I'd take some upper level math again to get familiar with it and to show that I won't be seeing those concepts for the first time in b-school.

I've never seen or read anything about the better chance those with legal background have to get into b-schools. My first GMAT score was 650 and I didn't do nearly enough prep. I've been going over the 800GMAT test and dang those quant questions are tough. Any advice on the really tough ones? I can figure them out, but they take forever and I end up guessing on the last 3 - 4.
_________________

------------------------------------
J Allen Morris
**I'm pretty sure I'm right, but then again, I'm just a guy with his head up his a$$.

Take a Survey about GMAT Prep - Win Prizes!

Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 14 Oct 2007
Posts: 759
Location: Oxford
Schools: Oxford'10
Followers: 13

Kudos [?]: 179 [0], given: 8

Re: Problem Solving Error in this question? [#permalink] New post 17 May 2008, 07:18
I think in quant, getting the basics in the key. Since each question is derived from the same basic concepts. I have heard that the MGMAT quant books for learning the basics. After the basics are down and you are comfortable with the concepts, do the GmatClub tests. These 25 tests will push the bar higher for you.

goodluck!
Re: Problem Solving Error in this question?   [#permalink] 17 May 2008, 07:18
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