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A diet high in saturated fat content increases the

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A diet high in saturated fat content increases the [#permalink] New post 06 Oct 2010, 10:15
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A diet high in saturated fat content increases the likelihood of developing heart disease. Several studies have shown that the regular, moderate intake of red wine decreases that likelihood. In the United States and Great Britain, the per-capita consumption of saturated fats is roughly equivalent. However, heart disease is less prevalent in Great Britain than in the United States, possibly because the per-capita consumption of red wine is higher in Great Britain that in the United States. Interestingly, the gap between per-capita consumption rates of red wine in the two countries has been falling, yet no relative change in the incidence of heart disease has been noted.

Which of the following, if true, best resolves the apparent paradox in the statements above?

A. Heart disease generally results from the build-up of fatty plaques in the inner lining of the arterial vessels that supply blood to the heart muscle.
B. Per capita consumption of saturated fats has decreased notably in both countries over the past decade.
C. The per capita consumption of red wine has increased notably in the United States over the past decade.
D. The relative incidence of other factors that contribute to heart disease, such as cigarette smoking and high cholesterol levels, is roughly the same in both countries.
E. Per capita consumption of red wine among the under-40 age group in Great Britain has dropped

Plz explain...Had a tough time solving this...
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Re: Heart disease CR [#permalink] New post 06 Oct 2010, 10:35
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I agree tough one. Took me 2.12 seconds to solve Please could you tell the source of the question?
Here is my analysis:

A. Heart disease generally results from the build-up of fatty plaques in the inner lining of the arterial vessels that supply blood to the heart muscle - the information given in this sentence is all out of scope according to me. This is too much to consider
B. Per capita consumption of saturated fats has decreased notably in both countries over the past decade - there could be other factors causing heart disease. Reduction in this can also contribute to no heart disease cases. [color=#FF0000] [color=#0000FF]So I go for B.
C. The per capita consumption of red wine has increased notably in the United States over the past decade. -this is same sentence from the stimulus.
D. The relative incidence of other factors that contribute to heart disease, such as cigarette smoking and high cholesterol levels, is roughly the same in both countries. - again cigarette, high cholesterol info is out of scope.
E. Per capita consumption of red wine among the under-40 age group in Great Britain has dropped - nowhere in the stimulus information is provided by age group.
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Re: Heart disease CR [#permalink] New post 06 Oct 2010, 11:44
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suyashjhawar wrote:
A diet high in saturated fat content increases the likelihood of developing heart disease. Several studies have shown that the regular, moderate intake of red wine decreases that likelihood. In the United States and Great Britain, the per-capita consumption of saturated fats is roughly equivalent. However, heart disease is less prevalent in Great Britain than in the United States, possibly because the per-capita consumption of red wine is higher in Great Britain that in the United States. Interestingly, the gap between per-capita consumption rates of red wine in the two countries has been falling, yet no relative change in the incidence of heart disease has been noted.

Which of the following, if true, best resolves the apparent paradox in the statements above?

A. Heart disease generally results from the build-up of fatty plaques in the inner lining of the arterial vessels that supply blood to the heart muscle.
B. Per capita consumption of saturated fats has decreased notably in both countries over the past decade.
C. The per capita consumption of red wine has increased notably in the United States over the past decade.
D. The relative incidence of other factors that contribute to heart disease, such as cigarette smoking and high cholesterol levels, is roughly the same in both countries.
E. Per capita consumption of red wine among the under-40 age group in Great Britain has dropped

Plz explain...Had a tough time solving this...


We know that in the US and in Britain, people are drinking wine in more similar quantities now than before. From the info given, that might lead us to think that the incidence of heart disease should be becoming more similar in the two countries, all other factors being equal. There are a lot of potential problems here; it may be, for example, that per capita American wine drinking is increasing only because a few people are drinking a ton more than before - it may not be the case that more Americans are drinking wine. Or it may be that there is some other factor which contributes to heart disease - say exercise, or diet - and while Americans may be lowering their risk of heart disease by drinking more wine than before, they may be increasing their risk by eating worse or exercising less. Or it may be that, for example, people who were never at great risk of heart disease in the US have started drinking wine, or that people who were never at great risk of heart disease in Britain have stopped drinking wine. There are very many potential resolutions to the apparent paradox in the question, so Process of Elimination may be the best approach here. But, if have information about the reasons that wine drinking levels have become more similar in the two countries, that may contribute to an explanation. E tells us that young people in Britain are drinking less than before; presumably younger people are at less risk of heart disease than older people, so this would help to explain why wine drinking levels are more similar but heart disease levels are not.

Looking at other answer choices, A tells us about the causes of heart disease; that's not relevant. B tells us that saturated fat consumption has dropped significantly in both countries. If we knew that the drop was greater in Britain, that might help to resolve the paradox, but we have no comparison between the drops in the two countries, so B doesn't help us to determine why the change in the difference of wine consumption in the two countries has not led to a change in the difference of incidence in heart disease. Similarly, D rules out other factors that might have helped to resolve the paradox, so D does the opposite of what we are looking for. C tells us that wine-drinking is increasing in the US. It doesn't matter whether drinking increased in the US or decreased in Britain; we need to know why this has not had an effect on the difference in incidence of heart disease.
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Re: Heart disease CR [#permalink] New post 06 Oct 2010, 12:09
I go for B
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Re: Heart disease CR [#permalink] New post 06 Oct 2010, 21:42
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I will go for B. Because I believe based on the argument the likelihood of developing heart disease is dropping in US because the consumption of the wine is increasing. So now if there is no relative change in the incidence of heart disease that means the likelihood of developing heart disease is dropping in Great Britain as well. If thats the case then only option B gives you a plausible reason.
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Re: Heart disease CR [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2010, 00:44
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Even i went for B.OA is E.Ian wonderful explanation.had to re read so many times.
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Re: Heart disease CR [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2010, 10:59
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This question requires us to make an unstated assumption that old people are at greater risk of getting the disease than other people are. Do you think that GMAT allows us to do so, or this is a not GMAT-like question?
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Re: Heart disease CR [#permalink] New post 07 Oct 2010, 11:14
According to me the best possible answer is B
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Re: Heart disease CR [#permalink] New post 21 Dec 2010, 11:35
shekharvineet wrote:
I go for B


I will also go for me...
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Re: Heart disease CR [#permalink] New post 21 Dec 2010, 11:36
amma4u wrote:
I agree tough one. Took me 2.12 seconds to solve Please could you tell the source of the question?
Here is my analysis:

A. Heart disease generally results from the build-up of fatty plaques in the inner lining of the arterial vessels that supply blood to the heart muscle - the information given in this sentence is all out of scope according to me. This is too much to consider
B. Per capita consumption of saturated fats has decreased notably in both countries over the past decade - there could be other factors causing heart disease. Reduction in this can also contribute to no heart disease cases. [color=#FF0000] [color=#0000FF]So I go for B.
C. The per capita consumption of red wine has increased notably in the United States over the past decade. -this is same sentence from the stimulus.
D. The relative incidence of other factors that contribute to heart disease, such as cigarette smoking and high cholesterol levels, is roughly the same in both countries. - again cigarette, high cholesterol info is out of scope.
E. Per capita consumption of red wine among the under-40 age group in Great Britain has dropped -
nowhere in the stimulus information is provided by age group.




Good Way of explaining... :)
Re: Heart disease CR   [#permalink] 21 Dec 2010, 11:36
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