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A group of children of various ages was read stories in

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A group of children of various ages was read stories in [#permalink] New post 14 Jan 2007, 20:10
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people caused harm, some of those people doing so intentionally, and some accidentally. When asked about appropriate punishments for those who had caused harm, the younger children, unlike the older ones, assigned punishments that did not vary according to whether the harm was done intentionally or accidentally. Younger children, then, do not regard people’s intentions as relevant to punishment.
Which of the following, if true, would most seriously weaken the conclusion above?
(A) In interpreting these stories, the listeners had to draw on a relatively mature sense of human psychology in order to tell whether harm was produced intentionally or accidentally.
(B) In these stories, the severity of the harm produced was clearly stated.
(C) Younger children are as likely to produce harm unintentionally as are older children.
(D) The older children assigned punishment in a way that closely resembled the way adults had assigned punishment in a similar experiment.
(E) The younger children assigned punishments that varied according to the severity of the harm done by the agents in the stories.
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Re: CR-GROUP OF CHILDREN [#permalink] New post 14 Jan 2007, 21:41
AK47 wrote:
A group of children of various ages was read stories in which people caused harm, some of those people doing so intentionally, and some accidentally. When asked about appropriate punishments for those who had caused harm, the younger children, unlike the older ones, assigned punishments that did not vary according to whether the harm was done intentionally or accidentally. Younger children, then, do not regard people’s intentions as relevant to punishment.
Which of the following, if true, would most seriously weaken the conclusion above?
(A) In interpreting these stories, the listeners had to draw on a relatively mature sense of human psychology in order to tell whether harm was produced intentionally or accidentally.
(B) In these stories, the severity of the harm produced was clearly stated.
(C) Younger children are as likely to produce harm unintentionally as are older children.
(D) The older children assigned punishment in a way that closely resembled the way adults had assigned punishment in a similar experiment.
(E) The younger children assigned punishments that varied according to the severity of the harm done by the agents in the stories.


One way to weaken the argument is to establish that the young children were not able(mature enough) to understand/establish the intentions of the person who did the harm.

A provides a possibility for this scenario.
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Last edited by ncp on 14 Jan 2007, 22:17, edited 1 time in total.
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Jan 2007, 22:03
For some reason I find all answer choices out of scope except A

Thus, I go with A
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Jan 2007, 23:43
A !
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 [#permalink] New post 15 Jan 2007, 08:32
A is the one...
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Re: CR-GROUP OF CHILDREN [#permalink] New post 15 Jan 2007, 10:19
AK47 wrote:
(E) The younger children assigned punishments that varied according to the severity of the harm done by the agents in the stories.

Yes. The Arg concludes that younger children do not regard people’s intentions as relevant to punishment. And that is what they base punishment on. However, if there was another factor contributing to their assigning punishment the arg would be weakened. Such as, the crimes done intentionally happened to also cause more severe harm. This could be the base of their judgement

(A) how they determined intentional/accident is irrelevant
(B) close but doesn’t say children regarded this highly.
(C) irrelevant
(D) older children compared to adults is irrelevant
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 [#permalink] New post 15 Jan 2007, 11:30
E says severity of harm considered
i.e. not intentions, supports conclusion

A it is
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Re: [#permalink] New post 07 Apr 2012, 01:27
AimHigher wrote:
E says severity of harm considered
i.e. not intentions, supports conclusion

A it is


Yup so essentially E- gives an other reason that why young kiddos did so and so... but not the intentions bit so this choice kind of strengthen rather than weaken. working backward I could go to A. As other options do not seems viable enough.
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Re:   [#permalink] 07 Apr 2012, 01:27
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