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A newly discovered disease is thought to be caused by a

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A newly discovered disease is thought to be caused by a [#permalink] New post 06 Aug 2006, 15:05
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A newly discovered disease is thought to be caused by a certain bacterium. However, recently released data notes that the bacterium thrives in the presence of a certain virus, implying that it is actually the virus that causes the new disease.

Which of the following pieces of evidence would most support the data’s implication?

(A) In the absence of the virus, the disease has been observed to follow infection by the bacterium.
(B) The virus has been shown to aid the growth of bacterium, a process which often leads to the onset of the disease.
(C) The virus alone has been observed in many cases of the disease.
(D) In cases where the disease does not develop, infection by the bacterium is usually preceded by infection by the virus.
(E) Onset of the disease usually follows infection by both the virus and the bacterium.
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Aug 2006, 15:50
This one is tricky. I think that A & C both say the same thing, that either the virus or the bacterium can cause the disease on its own.

I guess I will choose A. This piece of evidence shows that the bacterium can cause the disease without the virus; which refutes the conclusion that the disease is caused by the virus.
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Aug 2006, 16:54
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C 8-)
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Re: CR - disease [#permalink] New post 06 Aug 2006, 17:44
sperinko wrote:
A newly discovered disease is thought to be caused by a certain bacterium. However, recently released data notes that the bacterium thrives in the presence of a certain virus, implying that it is actually the virus that causes the new disease.

Which of the following pieces of evidence would most support the data’s implication?

(A) In the absence of the virus, the disease has been observed to follow infection by the bacterium.
(B) The virus has been shown to aid the growth of bacterium, a process which often leads to the onset of the disease.
(C) The virus alone has been observed in many cases of the disease.
(D) In cases where the disease does not develop, infection by the bacterium is usually preceded by infection by the virus.
(E) Onset of the disease usually follows infection by both the virus and the bacterium.


C for me.

The datas implication is : The disease is caused by the virus, not by the bacteria. We need to find evidence of the virus causing the disease.

A is out because it states the opposite, that the disease still can be contracted without the virus.
B says the virus aids the bacteria, making the bacteria central to cause of the disease.
D out of scope
E out of scope
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Aug 2006, 22:29
Will go with C.

A - weakens
B - just shows a casual relationship between virus and bacteria. Doesnot help to support the implication.
D - weakens
E - no supoort.
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 [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2006, 02:28
pelihu wrote:
This one is tricky. I think that A & C both say the same thing, that either the virus or the bacterium can cause the disease on its own.

I guess I will choose A. This piece of evidence shows that the bacterium can cause the disease without the virus; which refutes the conclusion that the disease is caused by the virus.


(A) suggests that in the absence of the virus, the disease occurs after a bacterial infection. No mention of the virus being the primary cause here, and therefore, not really supporting the conclusion.

(C) on the other hand isolates only the virus as being the leading cause of the disease. Indeed a tricky CR.

1:46
  [#permalink] 19 Aug 2006, 02:28
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