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A nutritionist studying the effects of massive doses of

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A nutritionist studying the effects of massive doses of [#permalink] New post 30 Jan 2008, 05:38
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A nutritionist studying the effects of massive doses of vitamin C found that of a group of 600 people who regularly took 1,500 mg of vitamin C daily for a year, fewer than 9 percent suffered serious cases of flu; of a group of 600 people who took 250 mg of vitamin C (the standard recommended daily allowance) daily for a year, 34 percent suffered at least one serious case of flu; and of a group of 600 people who took no vitamin C for a year (other than that found in the foods in a balanced diet), 32 percent suffered at least one serious case of flu.
Which of the following hypotheses is best supported by the evidence above?
(A) The effectiveness of vitamin C in preventing serious cases of flu increases in direct proportion to the amount of vitamin C taken.
(B) Vitamin C is helpful in preventing disease.
(C) Doses of vitamin C that exceed the standard recommended daily allowance by 500 percent will reduce the incidence of serious cases of flu by 25 percent.
(D) Massive doses of vitamin C can help to prevent serious case of flu.
(E) A balanced diet contains less than 250 mg of vitamin C.
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Re: cr 1000 d 5 [#permalink] New post 31 Jan 2008, 17:34
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go with D.
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Re: cr 1000 d 5 [#permalink] New post 31 Jan 2008, 18:48
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out of all these, i like C the best. D is suspect because it uses the term 'massive' ... who says that 1500 is massive ? I dont like the ambiguity of that, so Ill go with the next strongest option, which to me is C.
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Re: cr 1000 d 5 [#permalink] New post 31 Jan 2008, 19:26
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marcodonzelli wrote:
A nutritionist studying the effects of massive doses of vitamin C found that of a group of 600 people who regularly took 1,500 mg of vitamin C daily for a year, fewer than 9 percent suffered serious cases of flu; of a group of 600 people who took 250 mg of vitamin C (the standard recommended daily allowance) daily for a year, 34 percent suffered at least one serious case of flu; and of a group of 600 people who took no vitamin C for a year (other than that found in the foods in a balanced diet), 32 percent suffered at least one serious case of flu.
Which of the following hypotheses is best supported by the evidence above?
(A) The effectiveness of vitamin C in preventing serious cases of flu increases in direct proportion to the amount of vitamin C taken.
(B) Vitamin C is helpful in preventing disease.
(C) Doses of vitamin C that exceed the standard recommended daily allowance by 500 percent will reduce the incidence of serious cases of flu by 25 percent.
(D) Massive doses of vitamin C can help to prevent serious case of flu.
(E) A balanced diet contains less than 250 mg of vitamin C.


Its a close call between C and E.
But in C is calculation 25% is not correct. Such figures cant be concluded accurately.
I am leaning for E.
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Re: cr 1000 d 5 [#permalink] New post 31 Jan 2008, 19:32
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marcodonzelli wrote:
A nutritionist studying the effects of massive doses of vitamin C found that of a group of 600 people who regularly took 1,500 mg of vitamin C daily for a year, fewer than 9 percent suffered serious cases of flu; of a group of 600 people who took 250 mg of vitamin C (the standard recommended daily allowance) daily for a year, 34 percent suffered at least one serious case of flu; and of a group of 600 people who took no vitamin C for a year (other than that found in the foods in a balanced diet), 32 percent suffered at least one serious case of flu.
Which of the following hypotheses is best supported by the evidence above?
(A) The effectiveness of vitamin C in preventing serious cases of flu increases in direct proportion to the amount of vitamin C taken.
(B) Vitamin C is helpful in preventing disease.
(C) Doses of vitamin C that exceed the standard recommended daily allowance by 500 percent will reduce the incidence of serious cases of flu by 25 percent.
(D) Massive doses of vitamin C can help to prevent serious case of flu.
(E) A balanced diet contains less than 250 mg of vitamin C.


I say D. the tone in C is too extreme with the use of 'will' and there is nothing in the passage to suggest E. we can assume that it may, but it may or may not - what if they ate 250 mg worth of oranges?
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Re: cr 1000 d 5 [#permalink] New post 07 Feb 2008, 08:46
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D

A nutritionist studying the effects of massive doses of vitamin C found that of a group of 600 people who regularly took 1,500 mg of vitamin C daily for a year, fewer than 9 percent suffered serious cases of flu; of a group of 600 people who took 250 mg of vitamin C (the standard recommended daily allowance) daily for a year, 34 percent suffered at least one serious case of flu; and of a group of 600 people who took no vitamin C for a year (other than that found in the foods in a balanced diet), 32 percent suffered at least one serious case of flu.

Which of the following hypotheses is best supported by the evidence above?

(A) The effectiveness of vitamin C in preventing serious cases of flu increases in direct proportion to the amount of vitamin C taken. - irrelevant
(B) Vitamin C is helpful in preventing disease. - it is not correct. Non-massive doses are not helpful. "Massive doses of vitamin C are helpful in preventing disease" would be better.
(C) Doses of vitamin C that exceed the standard recommended daily allowance by 500 percent will reduce the incidence of serious cases of flu by 25 percent. - 25% is wrong and it is an strange hypothesis: what about 24%? or 24,8%? Also we have not precise data here: "suffered at least one" vs. "non-suffered" in the passage and "the number of cases" in this hypothesis.
(D) Massive doses of vitamin C can help to prevent serious case of flu. - the best. "Massive" sounds good because it comes form the passage: "A nutritionist studying the effects of massive doses of vitamin C..."
(E) A balanced diet contains less than 250 mg of vitamin C. - we cannot conclude it from the passage. In the passage 1500mg. 250mg are "extra" doses of vitamin C rather than "total" ones.
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Re: cr 1000 d 5 [#permalink] New post 07 Feb 2008, 21:15
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I go for B.

Next best for me wad D.

But word "prevent" is to strong conclusion. Likely to prevent could have done it for me.

What is OA?
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Re: cr 1000 d 5 [#permalink] New post 08 Feb 2008, 01:23
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Given:
1. 600 people 1500mg < 9%
2. 600 people 250mg 34 %
3. 600 people diet 32%



(A) The effectiveness of vitamin C in preventing serious cases of flu increases in direct proportion to the amount of vitamin C taken. (Not really – from 2 and 1, it is not proportion – eliminate it)

(B) Vitamin C is helpful in preventing disease. (Yes, but only flu is mentioned as part of the argument – eliminate it)

(C) Doses of vitamin C that exceed the standard recommended daily allowance by 500 percent will reduce the incidence of serious cases of flu by 25 percent. (Will reduce – conclusion, but for hypothesis, this is extreme – eliminate it)

(D) Massive doses of vitamin C can help to prevent serious case of flu.(From 1 it is clear – hold it)

(E) A balanced diet contains less than 250 mg of vitamin C. (May be true – but that’s not what the passage about – eliminate it)

Answer: D
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Re: cr 1000 d 5 [#permalink] New post 07 Feb 2008, 07:20
gmat blows wrote:
marcodonzelli wrote:
A nutritionist studying the effects of massive doses of vitamin C found that of a group of 600 people who regularly took 1,500 mg of vitamin C daily for a year, fewer than 9 percent suffered serious cases of flu; of a group of 600 people who took 250 mg of vitamin C (the standard recommended daily allowance) daily for a year, 34 percent suffered at least one serious case of flu; and of a group of 600 people who took no vitamin C for a year (other than that found in the foods in a balanced diet), 32 percent suffered at least one serious case of flu.
Which of the following hypotheses is best supported by the evidence above?
(A) The effectiveness of vitamin C in preventing serious cases of flu increases in direct proportion to the amount of vitamin C taken.
(B) Vitamin C is helpful in preventing disease.
(C) Doses of vitamin C that exceed the standard recommended daily allowance by 500 percent will reduce the incidence of serious cases of flu by 25 percent.
(D) Massive doses of vitamin C can help to prevent serious case of flu.
(E) A balanced diet contains less than 250 mg of vitamin C.


I say D. the tone in C is too extreme with the use of 'will' and there is nothing in the passage to suggest E. we can assume that it may, but it may or may not - what if they ate 250 mg worth of oranges?


it is D
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Re: cr 1000 d 5 [#permalink] New post 07 Feb 2008, 08:29
I'll go with B

it's the only one that, in my view, can be concluded without arguing over the definition of "massive" or assuming "A balanced diet contains less than 250 mg of vitamin C".
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Re: cr 1000 d 5 [#permalink] New post 08 Feb 2008, 01:59
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hanumayamma wrote:
(B) Vitamin C is helpful in preventing disease. (Yes, but only flu is mentioned as part of the argument – eliminate it)


Good explanation
+1
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Re: cr 1000 d 5 [#permalink] New post 09 Feb 2008, 13:03
In the answer choices given, how do you distinguish between 'must be true' and 'inference' types?

Thanks a lot.
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Re: cr 1000 d 5 [#permalink] New post 09 Feb 2008, 13:12
Expert's post
varunk wrote:
In the answer choices given, how do you distinguish between 'must be true' and 'inference' types?

Thanks a lot.


In GMAT CR 'inference' means only 'must be true'. It was my mistake a few posts ago :) .

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Re: cr 1000 d 5   [#permalink] 09 Feb 2008, 13:12
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