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A person borrowed a certain sum at the rate of 20% per annum

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Re: In the following figure find angle ACB. Given C is the poin [#permalink] New post 16 Jan 2013, 02:50
Dear Mike

May be this problem is not the "GMAT" type but the following solution is less time consuming-

We draw QO which is a common tangent to both the circles (as in attached figure). Now, AQ=QC & BQ= QC (tangents from an external point of a circle are equal.
Let angle CAB = x & CBA=y
therefore, angle ACQ = x & BCQ = y
now, ACB+CAB+CBA=180 this implies,
(x+y)+ x + y = 180
i.e., x+y = 90 or angle ACB= 90


hope you find this helpful.

- Pari :)
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In the figure below, AB, BC, BD & AC are chords of a circle. [#permalink] New post 16 Jan 2013, 22:12
In the figure below, AB, BC, BD & AC are chords of a circle.

The angle bisectors of \angleCBD & BCA intersect at E. EF is perpendicular to EC. If \angle CAB = 20^{\circ} and \angle BEF = \angle ABD, then find\angle ACD.

a. 30^{\circ}
b. 35^{\circ}
c. 40^{\circ}
d. 25^{\circ}
e. None of these

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Re: In the figure below, AB, BC, BD & AC are chords of a circle. [#permalink] New post 17 Jan 2013, 04:37
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I'm not explaining how I wrote the angles on the diagram. If you have doubts with that let me know. (use the property that the same arc will inscribe equal angles on the circle)

for ABCD - sum of angles is 360. so 4x+4y+2z+40=360. implies 4(x+y) +2z+40 = 360
for BEC sum of angles is 180. so y+z+x+90=180. implies x+y= 90-z ---> substitute this back up and you get z=20.

so E.

makes sense?
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A group consists of m equally efficient workers. A piece of [#permalink] New post 20 Jan 2013, 22:14
A group consists of m equally efficient workers. A piece of work was started by one of them. The p^th worker (where 2\leqp \leq m) joined the work (p - 1)x days after the (p-1)^th worker joined. The work was completed in mx days after the m^th worker joined. The 1^st worker received a share of $5500 out of the total $38500 paid to the group for completing the work. Find m.

a. 9
b. 10
c. 11
d. 22
e. 23

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A shopkeeper mixes three varieties of rice costing Rs.10, Rs [#permalink] New post 20 Jan 2013, 22:21
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A shopkeeper mixes three varieties of rice costing Rs.10, Rs.12 and Rs.17 per Kilogram. Which of the following represents the ratio in which the three varieties are mixed, if the shopkeeper makes a profit of 20% by selling the miture at Rs.15.60 per kilogram?

a. 9:14:36
b. 11:14:25
c. 14:36:43
d. 2:6:3
e. None of the above

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A person invested a sum of $91.30. In how many years will th [#permalink] New post 20 Jan 2013, 22:26
A person invested a sum of $91.30. In how many years will the sum become $5000, if it is compounded every moment at the rate of 100% per annum? (given e = 2.72)

a. 2
b. 4.5
c. 6
d. 1
e. 4

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Re: A shopkeeper mixes three varieties of rice costing Rs.10, Rs [#permalink] New post 20 Jan 2013, 23:50
Expert's post
pariearth wrote:
A shopkeeper mixes three varieties of rice costing Rs.10, Rs.12 and Rs.17 per Kilogram. Which of the following represents the ratio in which the three varieties are mixed, if the shopkeeper makes a profit of 20% by selling the miture at Rs.15.60 per kilogram?

a. 9:14:36
b. 11:14:25
c. 14:36:43
d. 2:6:3
e. None of the above

Source - T.I.M.E CAT'11 Series

At first, we calculate the CP of mixture. CP = [SP/(100+% profit)]*100 = 15.60*100/120 = 13/-.

Now, look at the cost prices of 3 varieties of rices. These CPs are 10, 12, and 17. The mixture CP=13 is closest to II variety of rice (12). [Concept of weighted average]
We can infer that among all 3 varieties, II variety ratio would be highest. Clearly, options A, B, & C are eliminated, because in all 3 options III variety ratio is highest. So the answer would be either D or E. Let's try with option D.

As per option D. CP of mixture would be.. =(2*10+6*12*3*17)/(2+6+3) = 13. It means option D is the correct answer. :)

For more on weighted average, pl. attempt these questions.
what-you-choose-is-what-you-weigh-143895.html
a-fresh-tricky-ta-dataset-on-weighted-average-146116.html

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The figure below shows the network connecting cities A, B, C [#permalink] New post 21 Jan 2013, 03:13
The figure below shows the network connecting cities A, B, C, D, E & F. The arrows indicate permissible direction of travel. What is the number of distinct paths from A to F?

a. 9
b. 10
c. 11
d. 12
e. 8

Source - T.I.M.E. CAT'11 Series
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Last edited by pariearth on 22 Jan 2013, 03:26, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: A person borrowed a certain sum at the rate of 20% per annum [#permalink] New post 21 Jan 2013, 03:35
hey hw many questions do we actually have here?

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Re: The figure below shows the network connecting cities A, B, C [#permalink] New post 21 Jan 2013, 19:47
Expert's post
pariearth wrote:
The figure below shows the network connecting cities A, B, C, D, E & F. The arrows indicate permissible direction of travel. What is the number of distinct paths from A to F?

a. 9
b. 10
c. 11
d. 12
e. 8

Source - T.I.M.E. CAT'11 Series


What about the lines which have no arrows? Are both directions permissible there?
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Re: The figure below shows the network connecting cities A, B, C [#permalink] New post 22 Jan 2013, 03:08
[quote="VeritasPrepKarishmaWhat about the lines which have no arrows? Are both directions permissible there?[/quote]

Sorry there was a technical problem...the correct figure for this question is uploaded again.
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Re: A person borrowed a certain sum at the rate of 20% per annum [#permalink] New post 22 Jan 2013, 03:28
chiccufrazer1 wrote:
hey hw many questions do we actually have here?


Hy,
A new question is added here daily...

-Pari

Last edited by pariearth on 22 Jan 2013, 03:34, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: [#permalink] New post 22 Jan 2013, 03:33
In a three digit number, the difference between its hundreds digit and its tens digit is equal to the difference between its tens digit and its units digit. Also the sum of the digits is 9. How many numbers are possible which satisfy the given condition?

a. 6
b. 7
c. 8
d. 9
f. 10

[Reveal] Spoiler:
D


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Re: In the following figure find angle ACB. Given C is the poin [#permalink] New post 22 Jan 2013, 04:54
Expert's post
pariearth wrote:
In the following figure find angle ACB. Given C is the point of contact of two circles and A, B are the points of contact of the common tangent PP1 to the two circles.
(Find figure in the attched file)
a. 60
b. 90
c. 120
d. 89
e. Cannot be determined

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As you have mentioned, this question is CAT relevant. The study material of CAT and that of GMAT are quite different. Although basic concepts are the same, it is not advisable to use CAT material for GMAT because it complicates things for no reason. There are a ton of things you need to 'know' for CAT which you don't need for GMAT. Your starting point in a CAT question is much ahead of your starting point in a GMAT question. Hence, this question isn't very relevant as far as GMAT is concerned.

Nevertheless, if you do get something like this, remember that you can solve by making the diagram according to your needs in PS questions.
Make the two circles equal so that you can easily see the required angle. Mind you, GMAT doesn't have 'cannot be determined' as an option.

Attachment:
Ques3.jpg
Ques3.jpg [ 8.87 KiB | Viewed 1007 times ]

You can see that it is an isosceles triangle with the ratio of the sides as \sqrt{2}R:\sqrt{2}R:2R i.e. 1:1:\sqrt{2}. Hence it must be a right triangle and the required angle must be 90 degrees.

If the required angle is 90 in this case, it will be 90 no matter how you draw the diagram.
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Re: The figure below shows the network connecting cities A, B, C [#permalink] New post 22 Jan 2013, 05:15
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pariearth wrote:
The figure below shows the network connecting cities A, B, C, D, E & F. The arrows indicate permissible direction of travel. What is the number of distinct paths from A to F?

a. 9
b. 10
c. 11
d. 12
e. 8

Source - T.I.M.E. CAT'11 Series


Just make a tree quickly.
From A you can take 2 different paths - B or D.
From B you can take 4 different paths - C, F, E, D.
From D you can either go to C or E and so on.
Continue till you reach F in every arm.

Attachment:
Ques3.jpg
Ques3.jpg [ 10.5 KiB | Viewed 993 times ]

Each F at the end will be reached through a different route.
Count the Fs at the end. You get 10 different routes.
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A father starts from home at 3:00p.m. to pick his son from s [#permalink] New post 23 Jan 2013, 03:33
A father starts from home at 3:00p.m. to pick his son from school at 4:00p.m. One day the school got over early, at 3:00p.m. The son started walking towards home. He met his father on the way and both returned home 15 minutes earlier than the usual time. If the speed of the father is 35 km per hour, find the speed of the son (in km/hr).

a. 4
b. 5
c. 6
d. 7
e. 8

OA:
[Reveal] Spoiler:
B
[Reveal] Spoiler:
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Re: In the following figure find angle ACB. Given C is the poin [#permalink] New post 23 Jan 2013, 04:47
[quote="VeritasPrepKarishma
As you have mentioned, this question is CAT relevant. The study material of CAT and that of GMAT are quite different. Although basic concepts are the same, it is not advisable to use CAT material for GMAT because it complicates things for no reason. There are a ton of things you need to 'know' for CAT which you don't need for GMAT. Your starting point in a CAT question is much ahead of your starting point in a GMAT question. Hence, this question isn't very relevant as far as GMAT is concerned.[/quote]

Dear Karishma,
I do agree with you on the above fact and I would be very thankful to you if you could give a comparision between the Verbal section of GMAT & CAT as well as the IR section of GMAT with DI section of CAT. I am particularly tensned about the IR section. Since I have given CAT once, I know its reasoning section is highly tricky and tough. So do I need to put in the same level of effort for IR section??
Thanks in advance...
-Pari
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Re: In the following figure find angle ACB. Given C is the poin [#permalink] New post 23 Jan 2013, 09:19
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Expert's post
pariearth wrote:
[quote="VeritasPrepKarishma
As you have mentioned, this question is CAT relevant. The study material of CAT and that of GMAT are quite different. Although basic concepts are the same, it is not advisable to use CAT material for GMAT because it complicates things for no reason. There are a ton of things you need to 'know' for CAT which you don't need for GMAT. Your starting point in a CAT question is much ahead of your starting point in a GMAT question. Hence, this question isn't very relevant as far as GMAT is concerned.


Dear Karishma,
I do agree with you on the above fact and I would be very thankful to you if you could give a comparision between the Verbal section of GMAT & CAT as well as the IR section of GMAT with DI section of CAT. I am particularly tensned about the IR section. Since I have given CAT once, I know its reasoning section is highly tricky and tough. So do I need to put in the same level of effort for IR section??
Thanks in advance...
-Pari[/quote]

The two tests are not very comparable but I can give you my thoughts.

Verbal Comparison -
RC is similar in both the tests though I feel GMAT RCs are easier on average.
GMAT has CR which is not there in CAT. It's very logical and easy to get through using reasoning skills.
The SC section is tougher in GMAT than any section that tests grammar in CAT.

The IR section of GMAT is very new and hence untested. The questions will not be very tough. Once you get the hang of what to do in them, they should be fairly easy - certainly much easier than some DI questions that CAT can throw at you. Try some IR sample questions here: http://www.veritasprep.com/gmat/integra ... questions/

The point is, GMAT needs logic and reasoning. If your concepts are clear, there is no reason you wouldn't be able to figure the questions. CAT is a much harder test since you need to 'know' a lot of things.
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Re: In the following figure find angle ACB. Given C is the poin [#permalink] New post 23 Jan 2013, 21:40
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
The two tests are not very comparable but I can give you my thoughts.

Verbal Comparison -
RC is similar in both the tests though I feel GMAT RCs are easier on average.
GMAT has CR which is not there in CAT. It's very logical and easy to get through using reasoning skills.
The SC section is tougher in GMAT than any section that tests grammar in CAT.

The IR section of GMAT is very new and hence untested. The questions will not be very tough. Once you get the hang of what to do in them, they should be fairly easy - certainly much easier than some DI questions that CAT can throw at you. Try some IR sample questions here: http://www.veritasprep.com/gmat/integra ... questions/

The point is, GMAT needs logic and reasoning. If your concepts are clear, there is no reason you wouldn't be able to figure the questions. CAT is a much harder test since you need to 'know' a lot of things.


Thanks a ton!! really helpful.......
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Re: A person borrowed a certain sum at the rate of 20% per annum [#permalink] New post 26 Jan 2013, 02:58
Find the area of a regular pentagon whose side is 20 cm, given Cot {36}[/deg]= 1.376.

a. 542 sq.cm
b. 544 sq.cm
c. 688 sq.cm
d. 764 sq.cm
e. 866 sq.cm
Re: A person borrowed a certain sum at the rate of 20% per annum   [#permalink] 26 Jan 2013, 02:58
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