Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 11 Feb 2016, 21:45
GMAT Club Tests

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

A politician wrote the following: "I realize there are some

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
1 KUDOS received
Retired Moderator
User avatar
Status: 2000 posts! I don't know whether I should feel great or sad about it! LOL
Joined: 04 Oct 2009
Posts: 1713
Location: Peru
Schools: Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, MIT & HKS (Government)
WE 1: Economic research
WE 2: Banking
WE 3: Government: Foreign Trade and SMEs
Followers: 82

Kudos [?]: 626 [1] , given: 109

A politician wrote the following: "I realize there are some [#permalink] New post 10 May 2012, 06:43
1
This post received
KUDOS
7
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  65% (hard)

Question Stats:

53% (02:23) correct 47% (01:20) wrong based on 378 sessions
This question is special because requires to know the differences between "most" and a "large number". Please confirm whether my reasoning is correct.

A politician wrote the following: "I realize there are some short-comings to the questionnaire method. However, since I send a copy of the questionnaire to every home in the district, I believe the results are quite representative...I think the numbers received are so large that it is quite accurate even though the survey is not done scientifically."

The writer of the above statement makes which of the following assumptions:
(A) Most people who received the questionnaire have replied.
(B) Most people in the district live in homes.
(C) The questionnaire method of data collection is unscientific.
(D) The large number of replies means that a high proportion of those sampled have replied.
(E) A large, absolute number of replies is synonymous with accuracy.

OA is
[Reveal] Spoiler:
E.

Yes, the OA is easy. But please confirm whether my process of elimination for the other choices was correct:
(A) Most people who received the questionnaire have replied.- The conclusion says that the author received a large number, but "large" doesn't necesarily mean "most". 1 million of answers is a large number but it could represent only 1% of the population. Therefore, "most" is not a required assumption. - WRONG
(B) Most people in the district live in homes.- Same as in A.
(C) The questionnaire method of data collection is unscientific. - If we use the negation technique: "IT IS NOT TRUE THAT the questionnaire method of data collection is unscientific". This new assumption doesn't weaken the conclusion. WRONG
(D) The large number of replies means that a high proportion of those sampled have replied. - Same as in A.
(E) A large, absolute number of replies is synonymous with accuracy. - BINGO
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

_________________

"Life’s battle doesn’t always go to stronger or faster men; but sooner or later the man who wins is the one who thinks he can."

My Integrated Reasoning Logbook / Diary: my-ir-logbook-diary-133264.html

GMAT Club Premium Membership - big benefits and savings

Expert Post
4 KUDOS received
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 6236
Location: Pune, India
Followers: 1681

Kudos [?]: 9643 [4] , given: 198

Re: A politician - Special question! [#permalink] New post 10 May 2012, 09:24
4
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
Responding to a pm:

A politician wrote the following: "I realize there are some short-comings to the questionnaire method. However, since I send a copy of the questionnaire to every home in the district, I believe the results are quite representative...

After reading this sentence, my first thought was: "Sending a copy to every home doesn't mean that every home participated and sent the questionnaire back. So the results may not be representative."

I think the numbers received are so large that it is quite accurate even though the survey is not done scientifically."

Here I thought: "It doesn't have anything to do with numbers actually. A large number of people did participate. But he is assuming that the survey is ACCURATE based on a large number of participants. Now there's an assumption. Point is, if we were trying to establish whether the results are representative, we could have debated on how many people replied from which strata etc. But the argument is actually trying to establish that the results are accurate based on a large number of replies. If you don't ask the right questions, you may not get the right answers, no matter how many people reply. Hence, the assumption is the connection between accuracy and number of people "

Remember, an assumption is a missing premise. This premise is necessary for the conclusion to be true. The argument needs to give us something like "If large number of people reply, the results are accurate." Since it doesn't, it is an assumption in this argument.

_________________

Karishma
Veritas Prep | GMAT Instructor
My Blog

Get started with Veritas Prep GMAT On Demand for $199

Veritas Prep Reviews

Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 6236
Location: Pune, India
Followers: 1681

Kudos [?]: 9643 [1] , given: 198

Re: A politician wrote the following: "I realize there are some [#permalink] New post 06 Jan 2016, 20:40
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
binit wrote:
A politician wrote the following: "I realize there are some short-comings to the questionnaire method. However, since I send a copy of the questionnaire to every home in the district, I believe the results are quite representative...I think the numbers received are so large that it is quite accurate even though the survey is not done scientifically."

The writer of the above statement makes which of the following assumptions:
(A) Most people who received the questionnaire have replied.
(B) Most people in the district live in homes.
(C) The questionnaire method of data collection is unscientific.
(D) The large number of replies means that a high proportion of those sampled have replied.
(E) A large, absolute number of replies is synonymous with accuracy.


I do not think the OA is foolproof. There are 2 premises here and the choices D and E each target the links between those premises and the conclusion.

Q is on the lips of the politician. So, in order to perform Negation Test of choice E, let's say somebody informs the politician that, "Sir, a large, absolute number of replies is NOT synonymous with accuracy."

He may reply, "But young man, a large, absolute number of replies, when clubbed with quite representative results, leads to accuracy w/o fail, isn't it?"

I just want to point out that, choice D is ALSO an assumption like choice E. Had the OA be D, the same thing could have been argued against that.

Experts please suggest. Where I am going wrong or overthinking?

Thanks.


No, that is not correct. The politician does not assume (D).
He says: since I send a copy of the questionnaire to every home in the district, I believe the results are quite representative...
He does not say that since we got a large number of replies, the results are representative. He is assuming that sending the questionnaire to every household makes the result representative. But every household may not have participated in the survey so it is an assumption.
He is assuming that:
"sending questionnaire to everyone" means "representative results"
and
"large number of replies" means "accurate results"

Only (E) gives one of these relations.
_________________

Karishma
Veritas Prep | GMAT Instructor
My Blog

Get started with Veritas Prep GMAT On Demand for $199

Veritas Prep Reviews

Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Verbal Forum Moderator
Verbal Forum Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 02 Aug 2009
Posts: 2053
Followers: 81

Kudos [?]: 953 [1] , given: 37

Re: A politician wrote the following: "I realize there are some [#permalink] New post 06 Jan 2016, 21:02
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
binit wrote:
A politician wrote the following: "I realize there are some short-comings to the questionnaire method. However, since I send a copy of the questionnaire to every home in the district, I believe the results are quite representative...I think the numbers received are so large that it is quite accurate even though the survey is not done scientifically."

The writer of the above statement makes which of the following assumptions:
(A) Most people who received the questionnaire have replied.
(B) Most people in the district live in homes.
(C) The questionnaire method of data collection is unscientific.
(D) The large number of replies means that a high proportion of those sampled have replied.
(E) A large, absolute number of replies is synonymous with accuracy.


I do not think the OA is foolproof. There are 2 premises here and the choices D and E each target the links between those premises and the conclusion.

Q is on the lips of the politician. So, in order to perform Negation Test of choice E, let's say somebody informs the politician that, "Sir, a large, absolute number of replies is NOT synonymous with accuracy."

He may reply, "But young man, a large, absolute number of replies, when clubbed with quite representative results, leads to accuracy w/o fail, isn't it?"

I just want to point out that, choice D is ALSO an assumption like choice E. Had the OA be D, the same thing could have been argued against that.

Experts please suggest. Where I am going wrong or overthinking?

Thanks.


Hi binit and akadmin,

Apart from the point being conveyed by VeritasPrepKarishma, the main point which struck me the time I went through the choices is..
what is an ASSUMPTION.
you do not have facts and based on some logic, you infer something that is necessary for an arguement to stand..

now the following points ..
    the politician has sent a questionnaire..
    he gets the replies..
    he is aware how many replies has he got..
    he says that a large number has replied..

so "(D) The large number of replies means that a high proportion of those sampled have replied." can be a fact but not assumption because the politician need not assume this as he has all the facts to verify it..

I hope it cleared a bit of air around the choice D
_________________

BACK IN CLUB AFTER A GAP OF 6 YEARS

http://gmatclub.com/forum/absolute-modulus-a-better-understanding-210849.html#p1622372
Errors in CR ---- http://gmatclub.com/forum/gmat-institutes-please-review-the-following-qs-211573.html

Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Jamboree GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Status: GMAT Expert
Affiliations: Jamboree Education Pvt Ltd
Joined: 15 Jul 2015
Posts: 246
Location: India
Followers: 43

Kudos [?]: 154 [1] , given: 1

Re: A politician wrote the following: "I realize there are some [#permalink] New post 07 Jan 2016, 02:37
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
In the argument accuracy is being measured in terms of the numbers of questionnaire received. The number is an yardstick to measure accuracy in this case or that is what the author has assumed. The politician thinks because he received a large number of questionnaire the accuracy cannot be questioned even though the survey is not scientific. " Large number" out here implies to proportion while "most" refers to the greatest number of people.
_________________

Aryama Dutta Saikia
Jamboree Education Pvt. Ltd.
Jamboree Course Reviews | Try 2 of our classroom classes for free before you have to pay
Get GMAT Club Tests for free when you sign up for any Jamboree course. Request access

GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 6566
Followers: 639

Kudos [?]: 133 [0], given: 0

Top 10 in overall
Re: A politician wrote the following: "I realize there are some [#permalink] New post 23 Dec 2013, 20:33
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.
Expert Post
Verbal Expert
User avatar
Status: Instructor @ GMAT-Workshop.de (Berlin)
Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 83
Location: Germany
Schools: HHL Leipzig
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V47
Followers: 16

Kudos [?]: 107 [0], given: 7

GMAT ToolKit User Top 10 in overall Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: A politician - Special question! [#permalink] New post 24 Dec 2013, 02:49
Expert's post
While selecting E, you make another assumption...that the politician does NOT know that higher accuracy depends on "high proportion" of responses and not "large number" of responses........ However if you assume that the politician knows that for accuracy you need high proportion rather than large number, then answer A or D could be correct. Isn't it?...In that case how do we decide whether the politician knows it or not?

VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
Responding to a pm:

A politician wrote the following: "I realize there are some short-comings to the questionnaire method. However, since I send a copy of the questionnaire to every home in the district, I believe the results are quite representative...

After reading this sentence, my first thought was: "Sending a copy to every home doesn't mean that every home participated and sent the questionnaire back. So the results may not be representative."

I think the numbers received are so large that it is quite accurate even though the survey is not done scientifically."

Here I thought: "It doesn't have anything to do with numbers actually. A large number of people did participate. But he is assuming that the survey is ACCURATE based on a large number of participants. Now there's an assumption. Point is, if we were trying to establish whether the results are representative, we could have debated on how many people replied from which strata etc. But the argument is actually trying to establish that the results are accurate based on a large number of replies. If you don't ask the right questions, you may not get the right answers, no matter how many people reply. Hence, the assumption is the connection between accuracy and number of people "

Remember, an assumption is a missing premise. This premise is necessary for the conclusion to be true. The argument needs to give us something like "If large number of people reply, the results are accurate." Since it doesn't, it is an assumption in this argument.

_________________

Image

http://gmat-workshop.de/public/index.php?mode=c4ca4238a0b923820dcc509a6f75849b

https://www.facebook.com/Gmat-Workshopde-149253021784592/

Current Student
avatar
Joined: 03 May 2013
Posts: 352
Location: India
Concentration: Operations, Human Resources
Schools: ISB '16, IIMA (M)
GPA: 4
WE: Human Resources (Human Resources)
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 87 [0], given: 68

Re: A politician wrote the following: "I realize there are some [#permalink] New post 24 Dec 2013, 09:09
A politician wrote the following: "I realize there are some short-comings to the questionnaire method. However, since I send a copy of the questionnaire to every home in the district, I believe the results are quite representative...I think the numbers received are so large that it is quite accurate even though the survey is not done scientifically."

THE LAST SENTENCE IS IMPORTANT- I think the numbers received are so large that it is quite accurate even though the survey is not done scientifically."

[b]Premise[/b] - Since the numbers received is large'''''
Counter premise - even though the survey is not done scientifically'''''''

CONCLUSION[/b]- The result is quite accurate.

New element in conclusion "accurate result'. To find the assumption- this new element has to be related to the premise. Hense one of the assumptions could be----[b]LARGE NUMBERS OF REPLIES MEANS THE RESULT IS ACCURATE..
... ONLY 'E' MATCHES. HENCE CORRECT ANSWER.

The writer of the above statement makes which of the following assumptions:
(A) Most people who received the questionnaire have replied. CANNOT BE ASSUMED. It is given that numbers received is large.
(B) Most people in the district live in homes. NOT AN ASSUMPTION.
(C) The questionnaire method of data collection is unscientific. INCORRECT. ONLY THE survey is not done scientifically.
(D) The large number of replies means that a high proportion of those sampled have replied. CANNOT BE ASSUMED.
(E) A large, absolute number of replies is synonymous with accuracy. JOINS NEW TERM TO PREMISE.... CORRECT.....

THIS COULD BE CALLED A SLIGHTLY ABSTRACT METHOD...... :wink:


KUDOS IF YOU PLEASE.......
Expert Post
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 6236
Location: Pune, India
Followers: 1681

Kudos [?]: 9643 [0], given: 198

Re: A politician - Special question! [#permalink] New post 30 Dec 2013, 22:53
Expert's post
sayantanc2k wrote:
While selecting E, you make another assumption...that the politician does NOT know that higher accuracy depends on "high proportion" of responses and not "large number" of responses........ However if you assume that the politician knows that for accuracy you need high proportion rather than large number, then answer A or D could be correct. Isn't it?...In that case how do we decide whether the politician knows it or not?



You are mistaken here. High proportion does not imply high accuracy. It may to an extent imply that data is representative provided the proportion of replies is similar from all strata of the society. Whether the questionnaire method gives accurate results depends on many other things such as the questions asked, what all they covered, whether the wording used was precise, whether people put in enough time to answer etc.

It doesn't matter how many people or what proportion of people participate in the questionnaire method. The results obtained may not be accurate.
_________________

Karishma
Veritas Prep | GMAT Instructor
My Blog

Get started with Veritas Prep GMAT On Demand for $199

Veritas Prep Reviews

GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 6566
Followers: 639

Kudos [?]: 133 [0], given: 0

Top 10 in overall
Re: A politician wrote the following: "I realize there are some [#permalink] New post 03 Dec 2015, 20:14
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 02 Nov 2014
Posts: 217
GMAT Date: 08-04-2015
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 43 [0], given: 75

GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: A politician wrote the following: "I realize there are some [#permalink] New post 04 Dec 2015, 01:32
A politician wrote the following: "I realize there are some short-comings to the questionnaire method. However, since I send a copy of the questionnaire to every home in the district, I believe the results are quite representative...I think the numbers received are so large that it is quite accurate even though the survey is not done scientifically."

The writer of the above statement makes which of the following assumptions:
(A) Most people who received the questionnaire have replied.
(B) Most people in the district live in homes.
(C) The questionnaire method of data collection is unscientific.
(D) The large number of replies means that a high proportion of those sampled have replied.
(E) A large, absolute number of replies is synonymous with accuracy.


I do not think the OA is foolproof. There are 2 premises here and the choices D and E each target the links between those premises and the conclusion.

Q is on the lips of the politician. So, in order to perform Negation Test of choice E, let's say somebody informs the politician that, "Sir, a large, absolute number of replies is NOT synonymous with accuracy."

He may reply, "But young man, a large, absolute number of replies, when clubbed with quite representative results, leads to accuracy w/o fail, isn't it?"

I just want to point out that, choice D is ALSO an assumption like choice E. Had the OA be D, the same thing could have been argued against that.

Experts please suggest. Where I am going wrong or overthinking?

Thanks.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 17 May 2015
Posts: 39
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 59

Re: A politician wrote the following: "I realize there are some [#permalink] New post 05 Jan 2016, 00:07
How did you to come to say that the point we are trying to establish is accuracy and not results being representative.



VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
Responding to a pm:

A politician wrote the following: "I realize there are some short-comings to the questionnaire method. However, since I send a copy of the questionnaire to every home in the district, I believe the results are quite representative...

After reading this sentence, my first thought was: "Sending a copy to every home doesn't mean that every home participated and sent the questionnaire back. So the results may not be representative."

I think the numbers received are so large that it is quite accurate even though the survey is not done scientifically."

Here I thought: "It doesn't have anything to do with numbers actually. A large number of people did participate. But he is assuming that the survey is ACCURATE based on a large number of participants. Now there's an assumption. Point is, if we were trying to establish whether the results are representative, we could have debated on how many people replied from which strata etc. But the argument is actually trying to establish that the results are accurate based on a large number of replies. If you don't ask the right questions, you may not get the right answers, no matter how many people reply. Hence, the assumption is the connection between accuracy and number of people "

Remember, an assumption is a missing premise. This premise is necessary for the conclusion to be true. The argument needs to give us something like "If large number of people reply, the results are accurate." Since it doesn't, it is an assumption in this argument.
Expert Post
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 6236
Location: Pune, India
Followers: 1681

Kudos [?]: 9643 [0], given: 198

Re: A politician wrote the following: "I realize there are some [#permalink] New post 06 Jan 2016, 22:03
Expert's post
akadmin wrote:
How did you to come to say that the point we are trying to establish is accuracy and not results being representative.



VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
Responding to a pm:

A politician wrote the following: "I realize there are some short-comings to the questionnaire method. However, since I send a copy of the questionnaire to every home in the district, I believe the results are quite representative...

After reading this sentence, my first thought was: "Sending a copy to every home doesn't mean that every home participated and sent the questionnaire back. So the results may not be representative."

I think the numbers received are so large that it is quite accurate even though the survey is not done scientifically."

Here I thought: "It doesn't have anything to do with numbers actually. A large number of people did participate. But he is assuming that the survey is ACCURATE based on a large number of participants. Now there's an assumption. Point is, if we were trying to establish whether the results are representative, we could have debated on how many people replied from which strata etc. But the argument is actually trying to establish that the results are accurate based on a large number of replies. If you don't ask the right questions, you may not get the right answers, no matter how many people reply. Hence, the assumption is the connection between accuracy and number of people "

Remember, an assumption is a missing premise. This premise is necessary for the conclusion to be true. The argument needs to give us something like "If large number of people reply, the results are accurate." Since it doesn't, it is an assumption in this argument.


As mentioned in my last post, there is an assumption made about data being representative as well. But none of the options provide that assumption. Option (E) provides the assumption made about accurate results and hence it is the answer.
_________________

Karishma
Veritas Prep | GMAT Instructor
My Blog

Get started with Veritas Prep GMAT On Demand for $199

Veritas Prep Reviews

Re: A politician wrote the following: "I realize there are some   [#permalink] 06 Jan 2016, 22:03
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
85 Experts publish their posts in the topic I have created some quizzes using the following GMATPREP BDSunDevil 25 30 Jun 2012, 01:02
Need some assistance with following instructions in MGMAT CR xjunglee1 2 16 Jan 2012, 21:43
1 A politician wrote the following: "I realize there are Trouper 12 22 Jul 2011, 10:37
1 OA to follow after some discussions crackgmat007 6 07 Nov 2009, 12:07
CR:Retired Politicians sravan_m444 5 08 Oct 2006, 14:34
Display posts from previous: Sort by

A politician wrote the following: "I realize there are some

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.