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A sequence is defined as follows: a(n)= (n)/(n+1) If n is a

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Manager
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A sequence is defined as follows: a(n)= (n)/(n+1) If n is a [#permalink] New post 12 Oct 2008, 05:01
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Question Stats:

76% (02:18) correct 24% (02:18) wrong based on 37 sessions
A sequence is defined as follows:
A_n= \frac{n}{n+1}
If n is a positive integer, then how many of the first 100 terms of this sequence are less than 0.891?

A. 7
B. 8
C. 9
D. 10
E. 12

M14-03
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Last edited by Bunuel on 01 Nov 2013, 07:47, edited 2 times in total.
Renamed the topic, edited the question, added the OA and moved to PS forum.
Manager
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Re: Zero :good one [#permalink] New post 12 Oct 2008, 05:47
hi mohammed

can i know why you have not start series from 0? as 0/0+1 = 0/1 =0 < 0.881

In this case you will get 0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8--total 9 terms.

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Re: Zero :good one [#permalink] New post 12 Oct 2008, 06:07
On the GMAT, the first term of a sequence is always a_1 (or b_1, or f(1), etc). Still, they always tell you that in the question itself, so I'm guessing the question above is not a real GMAT question.
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Manager
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Re: Zero :good one [#permalink] New post 12 Oct 2008, 06:28
This quastion is from very standard source :)

Actually it happens many timesthat we forget to consider case 0 .. this time i specially paid attention and i got wrong ..so i was little annoyed and disappoint.. but from now i will consider series to be start from1 if not specified.

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Re: Zero :good one [#permalink] New post 12 Oct 2008, 06:34
why aren't we considering -ve intigers and fractions in this one??
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Re: Zero :good one [#permalink] New post 12 Oct 2008, 07:03
yezz

if we consider -VE and condition will always wrong .. means ratio will alway > 1..

same goes for fraction too..

just check by putting some arbitery values.

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Re: Zero :good one [#permalink] New post 12 Oct 2008, 10:01
i dont think this is a std GMAT question!!
we are always told the range of n and type of n whether integer +ve or -ve etc
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Re: Zero :good one [#permalink] New post 12 Oct 2008, 10:12
I agree with Ian and Priya. Real GMAT questions will have no ambiguity :) they will have traps but no ambiguity :)

They spend a lot too much on one question to ensure it is perfect.
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Re: A sequence is defined as follows: F(n)= (n)/(n+1) How many [#permalink] New post 01 Nov 2013, 06:59
At here, n/(n+1) <0.891 so we have that n=<8. we have 8 numbers which meet the requirement
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Re: A sequence is defined as follows: F(n)= (n)/(n+1) How many   [#permalink] 01 Nov 2013, 06:59
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