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A university should not be entitled to patent the inventions

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A university should not be entitled to patent the inventions [#permalink] New post 27 Mar 2004, 20:25
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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  5% (low)

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0% (00:00) correct 100% (02:13) wrong based on 1 sessions
A university should not be entitled to patent the inventions of its faculty members. Universities, as guarantors of intellectual freedom, should encourage the free flow of ideas and the general dissemination of knowledge. Yet a university that retains the right to patent the inventions of its faculty members has a motive to suppress information about a potentially valuable discovery until the patent for it has been secured. Clearly, suppressing information concerning such discoveries is incompatible with the universityтАЩs obligation to promote the free flow of ideas.

19. Which one of the following is an assumption that the argument makes?

(A) Universities are the only institutions that have an obligation to guarantee intellectual freedom.

(B) Most inventions by university faculty members would be profitable if patented.

(C) Publication of reports on research is the only practical way to disseminate information concerning new discoveries.

(D) Universities that have a motive to suppress information concerning discoveries by their faculty members will occasionally act on that motive.

(E) If the inventions of a university faculty member are not patented by that university, then they will be patented by the faculty member instead.

20. The claim that a university should not be entitled to patent the inventions of its faculty members plays which one of the following roles in the argument?

(A) It is the conclusion of the argument.

(B) It is a principle from which the conclusion is derived.

(C) It is an explicit assumption.

(D) It is additional but nonessential information in support of one of the premises.

(E) It is a claim that must be demonstrated to be false in order to establish the conclusion.
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Mar 2004, 23:40
C and C
Hesitated between A and C for second question but C sounds better. The conclusion of second question is that "suppressing information concerning such discoveries is incompatible with the universityтАЩs obligation to promote the free flow of ideas". So it is assumed that universities should not be allowed to patent inventions.
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Mar 2004, 11:02
I'd go with D and C on this one. It was a tough choice for the Q1, but D wins over C for me. The author assumes D, if he does not, or in fact Universities dont hide ideas, his conclusion is ruined. Universities might have the RIGHT, but if they dont act on that right, the free flow of ideas is still promoted. The author MUST Assume that the University acts on its right, even occasionally. :shh
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Mar 2004, 11:27
lvb9th wrote:
I'd go with D and C on this one. It was a tough choice for the Q1, but D wins over C for me. The author assumes D, if he does not, or in fact Universities dont hide ideas, his conclusion is ruined. Universities might have the RIGHT, but if they dont act on that right, the free flow of ideas is still promoted. The author MUST Assume that the University acts on its right, even occasionally. :shh

I can negate D for question 1 on two premises.

First, the fact that universities who have the motive to suppress information concerning discoveries by their faculty members will occasionally act on that motive means that those universities will also sometimes not act on it. If we negate D, then the claim reads as follows: universities who have the motive to suppress information concerning discoveries by their faculty members will occasionally NOT act on that motive. The argument still stand and the key is that the word "occasionally" leaves some leaway for the argument whether the assumption is negated or not.

Second, let's say that the universities who have the motive withhold such information will occasionally do so, then what about the universities who don't have the motive to do so do so? In that case, D would be an assumption but the validity of the assumption would still depend what those universities with no such motivation do.
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Mar 2004, 11:53
Paul wrote:
lvb9th wrote:
I'd go with D and C on this one. It was a tough choice for the Q1, but D wins over C for me. The author assumes D, if he does not, or in fact Universities dont hide ideas, his conclusion is ruined. Universities might have the RIGHT, but if they dont act on that right, the free flow of ideas is still promoted. The author MUST Assume that the University acts on its right, even occasionally. :shh

I can negate D for question 1 on two premises.

First, the fact that universities who have the motive to suppress information concerning discoveries by their faculty members will occasionally act on that motive means that those universities will also sometimes not act on it. If we negate D, then the claim reads as follows: universities who have the motive to suppress information concerning discoveries by their faculty members will occasionally NOT act on that motive. The argument still stand and the key is that the word "occasionally" leaves some leaway for the argument whether the assumption is negated or not.

Second, let's say that the universities who have the motive withhold such information will occasionally do so, then what about the universities who don't have the motive to do so do so? In that case, D would be an assumption but the validity of the assumption would still depend what those universities with no such motivation do.


Paul, I see your point, but how does B serve as an assumption. The author nowhere in the passage talks about PUBLICATION..ooooooh, unless we take publication in the broad sense, as in REVEALING information. Hmm, I think I am too nervous about the big G coming up. I hope I dont stupidly screw up such questions.
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Mar 2004, 16:15
Ans:
19) D
20) A

Sorry, I don't have explanation.
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Mar 2004, 16:40
kpadma wrote:
Ans:
19) D
20) A

Sorry, I don't have explanation.


Wheeew, now I am wondering how I couldve messed up second question, when the author clearly states the conclusion in first sentence. I guess I just went with the crowd. :) This was a great discussion
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Mar 2004, 18:34
lvb9th wrote:
kpadma wrote:
Ans:
19) D
20) A

Sorry, I don't have explanation.


Wheeew, now I am wondering how I couldve messed up second question, when the author clearly states the conclusion in first sentence. I guess I just went with the crowd. :) This was a great discussion

The more I learn, the more I realize I know nothing! You said it lvb9th!
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  [#permalink] 28 Mar 2004, 18:34
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