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A valid argument is often defined as one in which it is not

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A valid argument is often defined as one in which it is not [#permalink] New post 22 Jul 2006, 18:33
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A valid argument is often defined as one in which it is not possible for all the premises to be true and the conclusion false. A circular argument is sometimes defined as one in which one of the premises is identical to the conclusion.

From these definitions we can infer that...

A) Every circular argument is valid as long as its premises are true.

B) Every valid argument is circular.

C) No circular argument is valid.

D) Some circular arguments are valid, and some are not.

E) Some circular arguments are not valid, and some valid arguments are not circular.

please explain
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Re: CR: Valid vs. circular argument [#permalink] New post 22 Jul 2006, 20:13
Not valid Argument: TT(All true premises) --> F (False conclusion)
Vaid argument: Everything else except the above combination.
So this means TT-->T, TF-->F,TF-->T and FF--> F are all valid.
Circular argument is one in which conclusion is one of premises..
TT-->T
TF-->F
TF-->T
FF-->F


So B.


OA please..
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 [#permalink] New post 22 Jul 2006, 20:40
I have done this question earlier. This is my error logs. This time I will not get it wrong. Thats why I am not answering it. Let others try. :lol: :lol:
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 [#permalink] New post 22 Jul 2006, 20:54
Tough call b/w D and E. :roll:
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 [#permalink] New post 23 Jul 2006, 02:02
:shock:

E?
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 [#permalink] New post 23 Jul 2006, 02:03
A-C are too extreme.

D looks better than E because indeed some circular arguments are valid.

(D)

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 [#permalink] New post 23 Jul 2006, 14:19
E it is....
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Jul 2006, 01:59
Valid argument -
Not all premises are true - Hence some premises are true


Conclusion is not false.

Cicular arguments -

One of the premises is identical to conclusion.

Now the answer choices.

A - Not possible. Valid argument wont have all the premises true.
B - Valid argument can have the same premise as the conclusion and may not have one. Hence we cannot say whether every valid argument is circular.
C - Same as above. Circular arguments can be valid.
D - True.
E - IMO the best . Covers both valid and circular arguments.
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Jul 2006, 02:06
D :?
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Jul 2006, 02:28
goin with D
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Jul 2006, 03:27
Raghavender wrote:
goin with D


Me too...D
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Jul 2006, 07:50
well... D for you all on this one :lol:

any other comments? it's not B or E either

please explain... don't just guess here... it will help you...
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Jul 2006, 08:11
u2lover wrote:
well... D for you all on this one :lol:

any other comments? it's not B or E either

please explain... don't just guess here... it will help you...


I chose D and not E because E goes a further step in saying that some valid arguments are not circular....

The argument never mentioned that.... I just tried to stay as close to the argument...

B is extreme....
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Jul 2006, 08:18
I meant D as a grade... D isn't correct here
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Jul 2006, 09:40
A valid argument is often defined as one in which it is not possible for all the premises to be true and the conclusion false. A circular argument is sometimes defined as one in which one of the premises is identical to the conclusion.

From these definitions we can infer that...

A) Every circular argument is valid as long as its premises are true.


I choose A. An argument is defined as one in which there can be true and false premises. As long as there is at least one true premise a correct/true conclusion can be drawn. A circular aggument is one which the premise = conclusion. Now ststement tells us that all premises are true. So the argument has to be valid, since one of the premises is the conclusion.
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Jul 2006, 11:43
U2Lover, OA and OE please?
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Jul 2006, 20:14
I'm ignoring the words "often" and "sometimes" while answering this question. Otherwise it doesn't make sense

the answer should be A.
Explanation :

A)
consider a circular argument with one true premise and a true conclusion. This also becomes a valid argument. RIGHT ANSWER.


B)
consider a valid argument with only one premise, which is wrong and the conclusion is right. This can't be a circular argument. WRONG

C is wrong because of A.

D and E are wrong.
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Re: CR: Valid vs. circular argument [#permalink] New post 24 Jul 2006, 20:26
u2lover wrote:
A valid argument is often defined as one in which it is not possible for all the premises to be true and the conclusion false. A circular argument is sometimes defined as one in which one of the premises is identical to the conclusion.

From these definitions we can infer that...

A) Every circular argument is valid as long as its premises are true.

B) Every valid argument is circular.

C) No circular argument is valid.

D) Some circular arguments are valid, and some are not.

E) Some circular arguments are not valid, and some valid arguments are not circular.

please explain



The problem statement
A, B => C
A, B => A

From this, I select E.
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2006, 06:43
OA is A

OE: Some people find this paradoxical, but it follows directly that circular arguments are valid. If the premises are true, and the conclusion is one if the premises, it must be true. Another trick here is the word 'valid.' Just because an argument is valid, does not mean it is true. Many people will make that false assumption and be thrown off on this question.

wasn't this one cruel??? I was b/w A and C, picked C :wall
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2006, 13:16
I misunderstood what they meant by 'infer from the rules'. Basically it means assume these rules hold true. The question itself states that one rule holds true usually (but not everytime) and the other one holds true some of the time.

I switched my answer from A to E, thinking I had successfully avoided the trap. :wall
  [#permalink] 25 Jul 2006, 13:16
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