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AART, a procedure that replicates heart arteries

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AART, a procedure that replicates heart arteries [#permalink] New post 23 Aug 2014, 03:58
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A
B
C
D
E

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Question Stats:

85% (01:45) correct 15% (01:01) wrong based on 105 sessions
AART, a procedure that replicates heart arteries using carbon nanotubes. enables people
with a weak heart to be able to participate in sports and to lead
a healthy life like a normal
person.

A. carbon nanotubes, enables people with a weak heart to be able to participate in sports
and to lead

B. carbon nanotubes; which enables people with a weak heart to partiCipate in sports to
lead

C. carbon nanotubes, to enable people with a weak heart to participate in sports and to

D. carbon nanotubes, enables people with a weak heart to participate in sports and to
lead

E. carbon nanotubes, enabling people with a weak heart to participate in sports and to
lead
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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Re: AART, a procedure that replicates heart arteries [#permalink] New post 24 Aug 2014, 08:26
It is pretty evident that the choice is between option D and Option E.

Would be really helpful if anyone could explain why is D (enables) preferred over E (enabling).

Is it the parallelism? Does both the words modify 'procedure'?
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Re: AART, a procedure that replicates heart arteries [#permalink] New post 24 Aug 2014, 13:12
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This is very similar to #55 from the OG, including the redundant "enables people . . . to be able" in (A).

Here's the deal with (D) vs. (E):

"Enables" is a verb, so we can say "AART . . . enables people to . . . "

"Enabling" is a modifier. If we say "AART, a procedure that . . . , enabling . . . " we never have a verb for our subject! It would be like saying "My cousin, Richard, thinking he is so smart." That's not a sentence until I actually give Richard a verb: "My cousin, Richard, thinking he is so smart, decided to take the GMAT today without preparing."
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Re: AART, a procedure that replicates heart arteries [#permalink] New post 31 Aug 2014, 00:35
Hi,

Can someone please explain why 'to be able to participate' is redundant here. Why is it wrong to assume that the device simply makes the person ready or equipped enough to participate, necessitating the use of 'to be able to', and not actually 'making' the person participate in sports activities? Is it because of the presence of 'enables' that we don't need 'to be able to'? Please help...

Thanks
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Re: AART, a procedure that replicates heart arteries [#permalink] New post 31 Aug 2014, 00:53
Expert's post
You've got it. "Enables . . . to be able" is what is redundant. It's like saying "There's a chance that it could possibly happen" or "I'm prepared to be ready to go."
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Re: AART, a procedure that replicates heart arteries [#permalink] New post 06 Sep 2014, 11:06
Can anyone explain why not B ? :shock:
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Re: AART, a procedure that replicates heart arteries [#permalink] New post 13 Sep 2014, 13:39
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There are a few big problems with (B).

First, "which enables" is a noun modifier, so it needs to modify the preceding noun. However, we want to modify AART, so this doesn't work. Even if we wanted to modify "carbon nanotubes," we would then need to say "enable" rather than "enables."

An even quicker way to spot this modifier problem is to notice that the word "which" is preceded by a semicolon. This means that the two parts of the sentence should be independent clauses that can work as sentences on their own. Let's look at them:

AART, a procedure that replicates heart arteries using carbon nanotubes

which enables people with a weak heart to participate in sports to lead a healthy life like a normal person.

Notice that neither of these is a complete sentence. The first one has a subject (AART) with no verb, while the second one is a modifier ("which . . . ") with nothing to modify. This makes the use of a semicolon here incorrect.

In fact, even if we put these two pieces together with a comma, we still wouldn't have a sentence! I see "AART . . . a procedure . . . which . . .," but we still have no verb for AART. This is a big problem. This "sentence" is all subject and modifiers, with no action! (Yes, there are verbs in the sentence, but they are all in the modifiers.)

One last problem is in the modifier itself:

which enables people with a weak heart to participate in sports to lead

We're missing the word "and"! I can't say "this program allows me to teach to learn." We need something to link those items.

Other than that, I love (B). ;)

I hope this helps.
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Re: AART, a procedure that replicates heart arteries   [#permalink] 13 Sep 2014, 13:39
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