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Accepting offer, then

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Accepting offer, then [#permalink] New post 17 Oct 2011, 03:18
Hi guys,

I am currently applying for a few different schools. Most of the schools I will apply for have their deadlines for the GMAT and the applications around March. One of the schools that I want to apply for, however, has rolling admission. I can apply today, and I will have my answer within 4-5 weeks.

My dilemma is that the school with rolling admission is one of my top picks, but not the top pick.

I am considering to apply for this school now, and accept the offer, should I be accepted. Thereafter, I plan to apply for the other schools, that I see as superior, in March. If I get accepted to one of the superior schools, I will then cancel my spot on the first school.

Do you guys reckon there could be any negative implications of this plan? All the schools I want to apply for are European top schools (most part-take in the CEMS program). Is it possible that the schools find out somehow that you have applied for other schools after being accepted, and that you thus lose your spot? I tried to find any info on the matriculation, and the deposit of the school that has rolling admissions, but I did not find anything. I obviously don`t want to send an email to the school, indicating that the school in question is not my top pick, or that I might not start at the school, even if I am accepted.

So in short:

    Is there any financial risk to this strategy(except the application fee). E.g. loosing your deposit ?


    Is there any risk of loosing my spot by using this strategy?


I hope someone will be able to advice me on this.

Regards,
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Re: Accepting offer, then [#permalink] New post 18 Oct 2011, 16:29
FromScratch wrote:
Hi guys,

I am currently applying for a few different schools. Most of the schools I will apply for have their deadlines for the GMAT and the applications around March. One of the schools that I want to apply for, however, has rolling admission. I can apply today, and I will have my answer within 4-5 weeks.

My dilemma is that the school with rolling admission is one of my top picks, but not the top pick.

I am considering to apply for this school now, and accept the offer, should I be accepted. Thereafter, I plan to apply for the other schools, that I see as superior, in March. If I get accepted to one of the superior schools, I will then cancel my spot on the first school.

Do you guys reckon there could be any negative implications of this plan? All the schools I want to apply for are European top schools (most part-take in the CEMS program). Is it possible that the schools find out somehow that you have applied for other schools after being accepted, and that you thus lose your spot? I tried to find any info on the matriculation, and the deposit of the school that has rolling admissions, but I did not find anything. I obviously don`t want to send an email to the school, indicating that the school in question is not my top pick, or that I might not start at the school, even if I am accepted.

So in short:

    Is there any financial risk to this strategy(except the application fee). E.g. loosing your deposit ?


    Is there any risk of loosing my spot by using this strategy?


I hope someone will be able to advice me on this.

Regards,



I'm not an expert when it comes to these kinds of things but I know what you feel because I've been through a similar process applying to USA schools. I don't think that business schools know of other schools you're applying to unless you tell them or they ask you. I know medical and law schools do this in their applications. They make you rank your schools of choice.

As you know, part of applying to multiple business schools is taking risks. You can decide not to go to the school you apply to now with the hope of getting into a better school in March. Unfortunately, due to the way the application cycle goes, you may not have that much time to wait for a decision in March. If you do decide to attend the school now, you can pay the security deposit. If you are accepted to your school of choice in March, you can withdraw from your school that accepted you now and lose out on that deposit (which is usually a lot of money). People do that all the time!

If you're willing to losing your security deposit, that's the only way I can see you having it both ways. I don't see any other financial risks.

Hope this helps! :)
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Re: Accepting offer, then [#permalink] New post 18 Oct 2011, 17:17
Quote:
Is there any financial risk to this strategy(except the application fee). E.g. loosing your deposit ?

Most school will only allow you a few weeks to submit your deposit after acceptance, so by using your strategy you'll likely risk forfeiting a large deposit.

To mitigate this risk I suggest applying to your top choices in Round 1 and then consider applying to your secondary choices in subsequent rounds depending on how your first patch of applications went.

Quote:
Is there any risk of loosing my spot by using this strategy?

No. The only exception would be if you applied early decision and signed a contract stating that you won't apply to any other schools after acceptance.
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Re: Accepting offer, then [#permalink] New post 21 Oct 2011, 02:15
Thanks for the replies. I actually talked to the school directly, and they do not have a security deposit policy. I guess some of the heavily subsidized European schools are less concerned about cancellations, considering the tuition fees are so low. I will apply, pay the application fee, and have it as a backup solution, should I not get accepted to one of the more elitist schools.
Re: Accepting offer, then   [#permalink] 21 Oct 2011, 02:15
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