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According to a 1996 survey by the National Association of

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According to a 1996 survey by the National Association of [#permalink] New post 06 Sep 2008, 14:47
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According to a 1996 survey by the National Association of College and University Business Officers, more than three times as many independent institutions of higher education charge tuition and fees of under $8,000 a year than those that charge over $16,000.

A) than those that charge
B) than are charging
C) than to charge
D) as charge
E) as those charging

Last edited by arorag on 06 Sep 2008, 16:32, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: SC As many as [#permalink] New post 06 Sep 2008, 15:56
How about underlining the incorrect part?

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Re: SC As many as [#permalink] New post 06 Sep 2008, 19:41
arorag wrote:
According to a 1996 survey by the National Association of College and University Business Officers, more than three times as many independent institutions of higher education charge tuition and fees of under $8,000 a year than those that charge over $16,000.

A) than those that charge
B) than are charging
C) than to charge
D) as charge
E) as those charging


I know you've narrowed down to D and E. And the last hurdle to go over is to find out the comparison. "Three times as many INstitutions...charge...as those...charge..." would work for this q.
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Re: SC As many as [#permalink] New post 06 Sep 2008, 21:50
arorag wrote:
According to a 1996 survey by the National Association of College and University Business Officers, more than three times as many independent institutions of higher education charge tuition and fees of under $8,000 a year than those that charge over $16,000.

A) than those that charge
B) than are charging
C) than to charge
D) as charge
E) as those charging


IMO E) ... as many as

three times as many institutions charge as those charging
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Re: SC As many as [#permalink] New post 07 Sep 2008, 07:47
Even though as those charging is not as good as as those that charge, but is the best answer among the five.

Hence E.
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Re: SC As many as [#permalink] New post 16 Sep 2008, 04:32
IMO E. We need as many as, and we need also "those" for a correct comparison
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Re: SC As many as [#permalink] New post 17 Sep 2008, 16:04
those is required... but "charging " is not parallel ... something wrong
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Re: SC As many as [#permalink] New post 17 Sep 2008, 21:00
arorag wrote:
According to a 1996 survey by the National Association of College and University Business Officers, more than three times as many independent institutions of higher education charge tuition and fees of under $8,000 a year than those that charge over $16,000.

A) than those that charge
B) than are charging
C) than to charge
D) as charge
E) as those charging


the llism is with "as" many x(s) "as" y(s) .....................

so //E//
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Re: SC As many as [#permalink] New post 19 Sep 2008, 12:39
I would have gone for D (mostly because charging does not maintain the parallel structure). What is the OA?
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Re: According to a 1996 survey by the National Association of [#permalink] New post 07 Mar 2012, 02:04
The OA is E but I am confused by "charge" and "charging" not being parallel. Any further comment on this?
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Re: According to a 1996 survey by the National Association of [#permalink] New post 14 Nov 2012, 10:42
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This is the real GMAT: Three Gmat forum 2 kind of answers to one PREP question!!!
take a look:

http://www.beatthegmat.com/comparision- ... 79937.html

http://www.beatthegmat.com/sc-survey-by ... t7534.html

http://www.manhattangmat.com/forums/con ... 13827.html

still nobody knows what is the OA??
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Re: According to a 1996 survey by the National Association of [#permalink] New post 21 Sep 2013, 22:26
I got this question in the GMAT Exam Pack 1. The OA is D. I chose E for obvious reasons. Explanations please?
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Re: According to a 1996 survey by the National Association of [#permalink] New post 21 Sep 2013, 23:59
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arorag wrote:
According to a 1996 survey by the National Association of College and University Business Officers, more than three times as many independent institutions of higher education charge tuition and fees of under $8,000 a year than those that charge over $16,000.

A) than those that charge
B) than are charging
C) than to charge
D) as charge
E) as those charging

gmatter0913 wrote:
I got this question in the GMAT Exam Pack 1. The OA is D. I chose E for obvious reasons. Explanations please?
They are using wordiness to make this tricky. Let's simplify this sentence as much as we can:

Three times as many institutions charge under $8,000 a year than those that charge over $16,000.

Let's plug in our answer options:

(A) Three times as many institutions charge under $8,000 a year than those that charge over $16,000.
Nope. If we use "than", we need to have another noun
(B) Three times as many institutions charge under $8,000 a year than are charging over $16,000.
Ditto
(C) Three times as many institutions charge under $8,000 a year than to charge over $16,000.
Ditto
(D) Three times as many institutions charge under $8,000 a year as charge over $16,000.
(E) Three times as many institutions charge under $8,000 a year as those charging over $16,000.

The sentence pattern is:
<quantity> as many <subject> <verb phrase> as <verb phrase>.
As many voters voted for Bush as voted for Gore.
This is clearly better than the sentence:
As many voters voted for Bush as those voting for Gore.

This one is tricky because the "three times" at the start is somehow inherently confusing. Let's use a different word w/a similar meaning:
Twice as many students buy pizza as buy salad. <-- Awkward, but workable.
Twice as many students buy pizza as those buying salad. <-- Clearly incorrect.
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Last edited by lukep on 27 Sep 2013, 22:00, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: According to a 1996 survey by the National Association of [#permalink] New post 22 Sep 2013, 02:50
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The way I see it is as below. Can experts from this forum confirm this, please?

Kindly correct if I am wrong anywhere. This is very important to help my understanding.

Comparisons using the form as...as typically fall in the below categories:

Comparing the numbers

1. Comparison of two groups doing the same action. (My intention is: Number of Americans who buy pizza= 2*(number of Indians who buy pizza)

Different ways:
Twice as many Americans as Indians buy pizza. (or)
Twice as many Americans buy pizza as Indians. (Here " Indians do" is not mentioned. "do" is in ellipsis.)
Twice as many Americans buy pizaa as Indians do.

2. Comparison of two groups doing different actions. (My intention is: Number of Americans who buy pizza=2*(Num of Indians who buy salad)

Different ways:
Twice as many Americans buy pizza as Indians buy salad. (or)
Twice as many Americans buy pizza as Indians who buy salad. <-- is this correct?

3. Comparison of same group doing different actions. (My intention is: Number of Americans who choclate=2*(Num of Americans who buy pizza)

Different ways:
Twice as many Americans buy chocolate as buy pizza. (Here "those" is in ellipsis) (question in this thread)
Twice as many Americans buy chocolate as those who buy pizza. <--- is this correct?
Twice as many Americans buy chocolate as those that buy pizza <--- is this correct?


Comparing Likelihoods

1. Comparison of likelihood of two groups to do the same action

Different ways:
Americans are twice as likely as Indians to buy pizza. (or)
Americans are twice as likely to buy pizza as Indians. (or) (Here "do" is in ellipsis) <--- is this correct?
Americans are twice as likely to buy pizza as Indians do.

2. Comparison of likelihood of the two groups doing different actions

Different ways:
Americans are twice as likely to buy pizza as Indians are to buy salad.

3. Comparison of likelihood of the same group to do different actions

Different ways:
Americans are twice as likely to buy chocolate as to buy pizza.
Americans are twice as likely to buy chocolate as pizza. <--- is this correct?
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Re: According to a 1996 survey by the National Association of [#permalink] New post 22 Sep 2013, 10:06
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Basically, we have two different comparison structures here.
(1) Twice as X as Y ==> X and Y must be parallel
(2) X as [....] as Y ==> X and Y must be parallel.


Let see your examples:

Twice as many Americans buy pizza as Indians who buy salad. <-- is this correct?
Correct. We're comparing the number of Americans vs. that of Indians. It doesn't matter what they do, we just compare the number of people.

Twice as many Americans buy chocolate as those who buy pizza. <--- is this correct?
Correct. "those" refers to a "new copy" of Americans. Thus, the sentence compares the number of American to by chocolate with that of Americans who buy pizza.

Twice as many Americans buy chocolate as those that buy pizza <--- is this correct?
Wrong. Absolutely wrong at first sight. "that" never modifies people ==> only "who" can do.

Americans are twice as likely to buy pizza as Indians. (or) (Here "do" is in ellipsis) <--- is this correct?
Correct. The structure is: Americans ...as [........] as Indians... ==> The parallel structure is maintained.

Americans are twice as likely to buy chocolate as pizza. <--- is this correct?
Wrong. The structure is: Americans..as [...] as pizza. The correct structure is: Americans are twice as likely to do buy chocolate as (Americans who are likely) to buy pizza

Hope it helps.
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Re: According to a 1996 survey by the National Association of [#permalink] New post 23 Sep 2013, 08:12
Also, kindly comment on the below

1. Penny has the same shoes as Amy has. <-- is this correct?
2. Penny has the same shoes as Amy's. <-- is this correct?
3. Penny's shoes are the same as Amy's. <-- is this correct?
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Re: According to a 1996 survey by the National Association of [#permalink] New post 23 Sep 2013, 15:30
Your question is about comparison "the same + Noun... as".

1. Penny has the same shoes as Amy has.
Correct. X has the same shoes as Y does.

2. Penny has the same shoes as Amy's.
Correct. Using possessive noun is one of several ways to omit words in the second part of a comparison.

3. Penny's shoes are the same as Amy's.
Correct. Basically the comparison is: X are the same as Y.

Hope it helps.
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Re: According to a 1996 survey by the National Association of [#permalink] New post 23 Sep 2013, 19:20
Quote:
1. Penny has the same shoes as Amy has.
Correct. X has the same shoes as Y does.

2. Penny has the same shoes as Amy's.
Correct. Using possessive noun is one of several ways to omit words in the second part of a comparison.

3. Penny's shoes are the same as Amy's.
Correct. Basically the comparison is: X are the same as Y.



Why I asked you this is because I saw an official Q in the form of (2) and it says it is wrong. The OA says "Amy's what", it could be anything. So the OA suggests to write as (1).

So, I got a doubt if (3) is acceptable.
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Re: According to a 1996 survey by the National Association of [#permalink] New post 01 Oct 2013, 22:57
gmatter0913 wrote:
Also, kindly comment on the below

1. Penny has the same shoes as Amy has. <-- is this correct?
2. Penny has the same shoes as Amy's. <-- is this correct?
3. Penny's shoes are the same as Amy's. <-- is this correct?


Hello gmatter0913,

I like your doubts as it makes you think and respond accordingly.

Here is my take -
1. Penny has the same shoes as Amy has. <-- is this correct? --Yes, this is correct. Comparison is logical and parallel.
2. Penny has the same shoes as Amy's. <-- is this correct? -- No, this is not correct, for the reason that the comparison is illogical. Here, is an ambiguity in the sentence, what are you comparing? Shoes or persons..

Sentence 2 can be written as -
Penny has the same shoes as shoes of Amy.
Now, you let reader think, what is author trying to compare .. Is it Subject or Object? Is Penny = shoes of Amy or shoes are same..?
rather the constrcution should be-

The below constructions are correct -

Penny's shoes are same as Amy's(shoes)
Penny's shoes are same as Amy's shoes
Penny's shoes are same as that of Amy



Can you tell me which OG question is testing this funda.. > I would like to review it as well.. :) .. let me know , I'll take a dig at that one in the follow up post.

In such constructions, simple concept is.

1- Construction should not be ambiguous.
2- Either compare objects or Subjects.
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Re: According to a 1996 survey by the National Association of [#permalink] New post 01 Oct 2013, 23:20
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gmatter0913 wrote:
I got this question in the GMAT Exam Pack 1. The OA is D. I chose E for obvious reasons. Explanations please?



There is no such obvious reasons for picking E, though I also picked choice E. But on reviewing, I found that I had made a blunder. :)

Quote:
According to a 1996 survey by the National Association of College and University Business Officers, more than three times as many independent institutions of higher education charge tuition and fees of under $8,000 a year than those that charge over $16,000.

A) than those that charge
B) than are charging
C) than to charge
D) as charge
E) as those charging


E ) just made us fool, by making us think that subjects are being compared appropriately. However, it is not.
As, charging is participle.. , and you can safely ignore the modifier and see if it makes sense. It doesn't

D) on the other hand, D is classic answer, here subject is in ellipsis

more than three times as many independent institutions of higher education charge tuition and fees of under $8,000 a year as(independent institutions of higher education) charge over $16,000.

The sentence trying to compare the Number of education institutes with certain characteristic

Here, is the example that may help you-

In Indian Marriages, More people drink than (people) eat. Here, we are comparing that number of people who drink is more than the number of people who eat. -> this is the structure of the correct answer choice.

Here is the incorrect one
In Indian marriages, as many people drink beer as people drinking wine. -> Replace drink with charge -

Here the sentence can be written as -

In Indian marriages, as many people drink beer as people drinking wine. - this is non sensical.

Makes sense..? let me know if you have any doubt.

In summary, E is wrong for the simple reason that Verb is not present.
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Re: According to a 1996 survey by the National Association of   [#permalink] 01 Oct 2013, 23:20
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