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According to a survey of graduating medical students

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Re: SC 42/1000 [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jul 2010, 06:35
noboru wrote:
bakfed wrote:
The OA is C.

However, I've always known that the correct idiom is "plan to", not "plan on".

If that's the case, how does one determine if we should judge the sentence's answer by "as likely as" or "plan to"?


Sorry, but as per my source, OA is E.



I disagree with E, i felt for B but later on realized that OA is C.

But for sure its not E.
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Re: SC 42/1000 [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2010, 10:48
This one has not been clarified yet!
Please, experts, help!
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Re: SC 42/1000 [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2010, 08:26
Please, experts, help!

My take:

(A) likely in planning: WRONG IDIOM
(B) likely...who plan on practicing: WRONG IDIOM
(C) plan on is WRONG, because is too coloquial, according to Ron (Manhattan)
(D) more likely than. WRONG COMPARISION
(E) as likely...."AS" MISSING. WRONG

I definitely need an expert to clarify this one.
Thanks!
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Re: SC 42/1000 [#permalink]

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New post 03 Aug 2010, 19:53
Tommy

Can I can infer that "X as likely as Y" ---> is comparing two nouns?

thanks
TommyWallach wrote:
(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing
CORRECT.
-t

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Re: SC 42/1000 [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2010, 23:42
Plan to is the more acceptable form:

Plan on is followed by a participle:

option C , 'as likely as' and 'plan on practicing' makes it the best option
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Re: SC 42/1000 [#permalink]

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New post 07 Aug 2010, 01:19
TommyWallach wrote:
Hey Nusma,

Well, technically, it would be "X is Y times as likely as Z to do something". That's the full on comparison construction. But yes, the two things have to be nouns, because the verb comes after the Z (to do something).

-t



Tommy,

Can u plz explain how (or if) 'more likely' can be used? Not just in this example, but in general.
e.g., is it right to say, "X is more likely to succeed than Y"?
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Re: SC 42/1000 [#permalink]

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New post 06 Sep 2010, 12:20
Okay. Lots of questions.

Werewolf: I think I overemphasized this issue. A and B have tons of other problems, and it may be legit to say "four times more likely." However, D is definitely wrong, because it can't be four times more likely with nothing to compare to grammatically.

I also want to address Ramana's issue, which was also sent to be privately by another student. The preferred form is "plan to VERB." I don't know for certain is the correct answer choice here would be correct on the GMAT. Just know the preferred form, and that this form is also possible. I doubt you'll ever be asked to make a direct choice between the two, with no other issues to look at.

-t
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Re: SC 42/1000 [#permalink]

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New post 06 Sep 2010, 12:22
I've done some searching, and I do think "as likely as" is definitely preferred, to the extent that it's legit to remove A and B for that reason. Phew!

-t
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Re: SC 42/1000 [#permalink]

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New post 07 Sep 2010, 10:45
Tommy
Is "four times more likely than" illegal? If C used that instead of as likely as, would that be a problem?
Thanks
TommyWallach wrote:
Hey All,

I was asked by private message to take this one on, even though there has been plenty of great stuff written already. Here we go:

This is a comparison question, so the whole point is to make sure we're comparing the right two things, and using the correct terminology.

42. According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges, minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.
(A) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice
PROBLEM: Should be "four times AS likely AS other graduates TO plan". That's a three-fer!

(B) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than other graduates who plan on practicing
PROBLEM: Again "four times AS likely AS other graduates TO plan". This one doesn't ever complete, because the "who" opens up a new modifier, and we never return to the main clause.

(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing
CORRECT.

(D) it is nearly four times more likely that minority graduates rather than other graduates will plan to practice
PROBLEM: "Four times AS likely" and RATHER THAN implies preference, which makes no sense here. Also, it's totally unclear what's being compared.

(E) it is nearly four times as likely for minority graduates than other graduates to plan to practice
PROBLEM: "for minority graduates than other graduates" makes absolutely no sense at all. Where's the comparison?

Hope that helps!

-t


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Re: SC 42/1000 [#permalink]

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New post 26 Oct 2010, 10:53
E has a serious grammatical flaw. -[highlight]As[/highlight]likely for minority graduates [highlight]than[/highlight]other graduates – can never co exist. If some source says E is the OA, it must be typo
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Re: SC 42/1000 [#permalink]

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New post 23 Dec 2010, 12:58
(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing

"more likely + to " - Correct Idiom . Hence, Option C
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Re: SC 42/1000 [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jan 2011, 12:48
rojans wrote:
A from me


More likelier than ..

more likely to..
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Re: SC 42/1000 [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jul 2011, 20:25
brick2009 wrote:
No way for E.. IT is ambigious

And i think C is incorrect too.

We are basically saying that minority students are more likely to serve in poor area than other grads students.

minority grads: 1 out of 4
Other grads: 1 out of 10

C: Changes the meaning of the sentence... as likely as => the same probability as other grads...

So C is out...

...so left with A and B...

A is clear : Minority grads ...are more likely ... to practice in poor areas..


Ans is: A

??? any thoughts


Hi Brick2009,

A can not be answer because comparison is not correct.
42. According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges, minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.
(A) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice

Minority graduates should be compared with "other graduates" not with "are other graduates" .
To see it.
(A) minority graduates are [strike]nearly four times[/strike] more likely than are other graduates....
A is more likely than B. Here A should be parallel to B.


I hope my explanation will help. Please press +1 if it indeed.
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students [#permalink]

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New post 13 Apr 2012, 21:42
thank youTommyWallach, this was very helpful in the explanation. When doing the comparison will you always need to do "as x as"
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students [#permalink]

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New post 01 May 2013, 22:18
I was left with B and C. I chose B because it has 'more likely than' as in original sentence. 'as likely as' changes the meaning right? Original sentence is saying 'more likely than'. We should see that the meaning change does not happen.Why cant B be the answer which says 'more likely than'. If there is no change in meaning and if they both are idiomatically correct, then what is the difference between these clauses. Are they interchangeable?
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Re: SC 42/1000 [#permalink]

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New post 21 May 2013, 23:19
noboru wrote:
bakfed wrote:
The OA is C.

However, I've always known that the correct idiom is "plan to", not "plan on".

If that's the case, how does one determine if we should judge the sentence's answer by "as likely as" or "plan to"?


Sorry, but as per my source, OA is E.




plan something out

to make thorough plans for something. Let us sit down and plan our strategy out. We sat down and planned out our strategy.


plan for someone

to prepare enough [of something] for someone. Fred just called and said he can show up for dinner after all. Please plan for him. Tony wasn't planned for, and there is no place for him to sit.

plan for something

1. to prepare for something. I need to take some time and plan for my retirement. We carefully planned for almost every possibility.
2. to prepare or estimate for a certain number [of people or things]. I am planning for twelve. I hope everyone can come.

plan on someone

to be ready for someone; to anticipate someone's arrival. Don't plan on Sam. He has a cold and probably won't come. We are planning on Ted and Bill.

plan on something

to prepare for something; to be ready for something; to anticipate something. If I were you, I would plan on a big crowd at your open house. This was not planned on.
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students [#permalink]

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New post 11 Feb 2014, 05:28
(A) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice Wrong - the correct comparative element is "as likely as"; "are" is not needed to complete the comparison.

(B) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than other graduates who plan on practicing Wrong - the correct comparative element is "as likely as"

(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing Best choice, but not perfect.

(D) it is nearly four times more likely that minority graduates rather than other graduates will plan to practice Wrong - "this is unidiomatic; Comparative element "four times more likely" should never be combined with an idiom"graduates rather than other graduates"; "that" should be only used with "so" or "such" in order to express sufficiency; in general awkward and nonsensical.

(E) it is nearly four times as likely for minority graduates than other graduates to plan to practice Wrong - "as likely than" is not a correct comparative element.

IMO A

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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students [#permalink]

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New post 16 Mar 2014, 08:19
According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges, minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.

(A) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice
(B) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than other graduates who plan on practicing
(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing
(D) it is nearly four times more likely that minority graduates rather than other graduates will plan to practice
(E) it is nearly four times as likely for minority graduates than other graduates to plan to practice

According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges,

minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.

Meaning : According to a survey, MG are nearly four times more likely than OG to plan on practicing Z

Option D) “rather” doesn’t make sense. - Eliminated

Option E) “to plan to practice” there are two intents in the same sentence, making the sentence awkward – Eliminated.

I am confused for Option A/B/C.

One of the rule I follow is more should have “than”. Both A and B satisfy that rule. e-gmat, can you please point out the mistake?
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Re: According to a survey of graduating medical students [#permalink]

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New post 16 Mar 2014, 08:46
For a moment, forget the comparison.

One is likely "to do something." A and B don't use this construction.

(A) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice
(B) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than other graduates who plan on practicing
(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing
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Re: SC 42/1000 [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2014, 20:16
Hi Tommy,

Can you please explain why is "more likely than" incorrect? Is there any rule around that? Is it replaceable only by "as likely as"?
Please do respond!

Thank you

Regards,
Neha


TommyWallach wrote:
Hey All,

I was asked by private message to take this one on, even though there has been plenty of great stuff written already. Here we go:

This is a comparison question, so the whole point is to make sure we're comparing the right two things, and using the correct terminology.

42. According to a survey of graduating medical students conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges, minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice in socioeconomically deprived areas.
(A) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than are other graduates in planning to practice
PROBLEM: Should be "four times AS likely AS other graduates TO plan". That's a three-fer!

(B) minority graduates are nearly four times more likely than other graduates who plan on practicing
PROBLEM: Again "four times AS likely AS other graduates TO plan". This one doesn't ever complete, because the "who" opens up a new modifier, and we never return to the main clause.

(C) minority graduates are nearly four times as likely as other graduates to plan on practicing
CORRECT.

(D) it is nearly four times more likely that minority graduates rather than other graduates will plan to practice
PROBLEM: "Four times AS likely" and RATHER THAN implies preference, which makes no sense here. Also, it's totally unclear what's being compared.

(E) it is nearly four times as likely for minority graduates than other graduates to plan to practice
PROBLEM: "for minority graduates than other graduates" makes absolutely no sense at all. Where's the comparison?

Hope that helps!

-t
Re: SC 42/1000   [#permalink] 29 May 2014, 20:16

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