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According to some analysts, the gains in the stock market

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According to some analysts, the gains in the stock market [#permalink] New post 15 Aug 2010, 01:52
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  35% (medium)

Question Stats:

50% (02:03) correct 49% (01:19) wrong based on 284 sessions
According to some analysts, the gains in the stock
market reflect growing confidence that the economy
will avoid the recession that many had feared earlier in
the year and instead come
in for a “soft landing,”
followed by a gradual increase in business activity.

(A) that the economy will avoid the recession
that many had feared earlier in the year and
instead come
(B) in the economy to avoid the recession, what
many feared earlier in the year, rather to come
(C) in the economy’s ability to avoid the recession,
something earlier in the year many had feared,
and instead to come
(D) in the economy to avoid the recession many
were fearing earlier in the year, and rather
to come
(E) that the economy will avoid the recession that
was feared earlier this year by many, with it
instead coming



Spoiler:


Can anyone explain to me why "had feared" is ok here?
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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Re: According to some analyst [#permalink] New post 15 Aug 2010, 08:16
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All other options except A are plain wrong.

According to some analysts, the gains in the stock market reflect growing confidence that the economy will avoid the recession that many had feared earlier in the year and instead come in for a “soft landing,” followed by a gradual increase in business activity.

(A) that the economy will avoid the recession that many had feared earlier in the year and instead come - CORRECT
(B) in the economy to avoid the recession, what many feared earlier in the year, rather to come
(C) in the economy’s ability to avoid the recession, something earlier in the year many had feared, and instead to come
(D) in the economy to avoid the recession many were fearing earlier in the year, and rather to come
(E) that the economy will avoid the recession that was feared earlier this year by many, with it instead coming
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Re: According to some analyst [#permalink] New post 15 Aug 2010, 08:53
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Option A is correct in this case. The split is between "That" and "in" + "Will avoid" and "to avoid"
Now not considering the portion" growing confidence" we get ..... "the gains in the stock market reflect ..... that the economy will avoid...."
Therefore its either A or E.

The past perfect form had feared is used to keep the logical flow of events. The sequence is jumbled up in the original sentence but can be read like following:
" many had feared earlier in the year" (Past perfect - had feared economy will slow down in past) ....... ( implicit past - economy recovered ) "the gains in the stock market reflect growing confidence" (present - reflect confidence now) ...... "the economy will avoid the recession" (future)

The Past Perfect expresses the idea that something occurred before another action in the past. It can also show that something happened before a specific time in the past. - people feared that economy will slow down but stopped fearing after it recovered.

I hope I am correct. Please let me know your views on this.
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Re: According to some analyst [#permalink] New post 15 Aug 2010, 10:30
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More precisely, the use of "past perfect" is used in this sentence to show the temination of the trend in the past by some other event in the past.
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Re: According to some analyst [#permalink] New post 15 Aug 2010, 10:37
rlevochkin wrote:
More precisely, the use of "past perfect" is used in this sentence to show the temination of the trend in the past by some other event in the past.

is this one of the properties of the past perfect tense?
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Re: According to some analyst [#permalink] New post 15 Aug 2010, 10:47
Yes it is. It is used to indicate that one action happened (and ended) before another and make the sequence clear.
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Re: According to some analyst [#permalink] New post 15 Aug 2010, 17:47
Hmn, but then, shouldn't the Simple Past tense suffice here? To acknowledged that it happened in the past should be enough right?

I usually see the past perfect when there is the past simple also in the same sentence to indicate what action happens first. This is not the case here.
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Re: According to some analyst [#permalink] New post 20 May 2011, 20:46
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Metallicafan wrote

Quote:
Please, your help with this:

a) According to the OE in the OG 12th: "The original sentence successfully avoids the problems that may occur in a long sentence with multiple modifiers. Two subordinate clauses begin with "that", and one of them is contained within another".

Could someone please explain: why does, in this case, the sentence successfully avoid this usual problem?, and Why, in other cases, other sentences can't?

b) How can one be sure that "come" is parallel with "avoid", and not with "reflect" of the main clause?,

c) In B, why does "rather to come" is wrong?




The problem with this question is that it is a recent OG question and that we have to take the OA and OE per se, however cryptic or abnormal they are. Let me give my own interpretation of the GMAC’s thinking.


a) According to the OE in the OG 12th: "The original sentence successfully avoids the problems that may occur in a long sentence with multiple modifiers. Two subordinate clauses begin with "that", and one of them is contained within another


(A) that the economy will avoid the recession that many had feared earlier in the year and instead come

The question here is what is going to avoid the recession? Is it the economy or the confidence? If we realize that it is the economy that will avoid the recession, then the expression ‘in the economy’ becomes irrelevant. Thus A avoids the pitfall of multiple modifier sentences in which it will be difficult to fix which noun will be modified by which modifier. A seems to be better than B, C and D

b) How can one be sure that "come" is parallel with "avoid", and not with "reflect" of the main clause?,

The confidence does two things and those two things must be parallel. One is that the economy will avoid something and instead (will) come in for something. Reflect is a present tense plural verb and (will) come is a singular future tense verb as in ‘will avoid’. Please do not lose sight of the auxiliary verb ‘will’. So 'reflect' and 'come' are
not parallel.

C In B, why does "rather to come" is wrong

Pl lread in full - “According to some analysts, the gains in the stock market reflect growing confidence in the economy to avoid the recession, what many feared earlier in the year, rather to come in for a 'soft landing', followed by a gradual increase in the business activity.”

First part: The gains reflect confidence (in the economy) to avoid the recession
Second part: The gains reflect confidence (in the economy) to come in for soft landing

When OG says that ‘to come’ is not idiomatic, it may be meaning that ‘to come’, though grammatically parallel ‘to avoid’, is not the normal usage. Common usage is to describe it as ‘to avoid’ ‘but / instead come’, dropping the infinitive marker ‘to” in the second part.
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Re: According to some analyst [#permalink] New post 23 Sep 2012, 03:15
daagh wrote:
Metallicafan wrote

Quote:
Please, your help with this:

a) According to the OE in the OG 12th: "The original sentence successfully avoids the problems that may occur in a long sentence with multiple modifiers. Two subordinate clauses begin with "that", and one of them is contained within another".

Could someone please explain: why does, in this case, the sentence successfully avoid this usual problem?, and Why, in other cases, other sentences can't?

b) How can one be sure that "come" is parallel with "avoid", and not with "reflect" of the main clause?,

c) In B, why does "rather to come" is wrong?



The problem with this question is that it is a recent OG question and that we have to take the OA and OE per se, however cryptic or abnormal they are. Let me give my own interpretation of the GMAC’s thinking.


a) According to the OE in the OG 12th: "The original sentence successfully avoids the problems that may occur in a long sentence with multiple modifiers. Two subordinate clauses begin with "that", and one of them is contained within another


(A) that the economy will avoid the recession that many had feared earlier in the year and instead come

The question here is what is going to avoid the recession? Is it the economy or the confidence? If we realize that it is the economy that will avoid the recession, then the expression ‘in the economy’ becomes irrelevant. Thus A avoids the pitfall of multiple modifier sentences in which it will be difficult to fix which noun will be modified by which modifier. A seems to be better than B, C and D

b) How can one be sure that "come" is parallel with "avoid", and not with "reflect" of the main clause?,

The confidence does two things and those two things must be parallel. One is that the economy will avoid something and instead (will) come in for something. Reflect is a present tense plural verb and (will) come is a singular future tense verb as in ‘will avoid’. Please do not lose sight of the auxiliary verb ‘will’. So 'reflect' and 'come' are
not parallel.

C In B, why does "rather to come" is wrong

Pl lread in full - “According to some analysts, the gains in the stock market reflect growing confidence in the economy to avoid the recession, what many feared earlier in the year, rather to come in for a 'soft landing', followed by a gradual increase in the business activity.”

First part: The gains reflect confidence (in the economy) to avoid the recession
Second part: The gains reflect confidence (in the economy) to come in for soft landing

When OG says that ‘to come’ is not idiomatic, it may be meaning that ‘to come’, though grammatically parallel ‘to avoid’, is not the normal usage. Common usage is to describe it as ‘to avoid’ ‘but / instead come’, dropping the infinitive marker ‘to” in the second part.



Thanks for your explanation but I'm still unclear.

All the options including option A look bad though I'd agree that A seems to be the best amongst the bad answers. Please help me understand the following:

What is common amongst all the options is that economy is in action i.e. economy is avoiding recession
For example in (A): ".. economy will avoid recession.." - how can economy avoid something; it is not a living being :(
WHY IS IT A GOOD OPTION to have economy avoiding something in a sentence??? Please help here.

(B): "..recession, what many feared .." - awkward; it could have been "..recession that many feared .."
(C): "economy's ability" - awkward; ".. instead to come ..." - not parallel
(D): many were fearing - wrong; rather to come - not parallel
(E): with it instead coming - non-sensical
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Re: According to some analysts, the gains in the stock market [#permalink] New post 27 Mar 2013, 10:42
Yes, the construction of all the sentences in the ans choices b,c,d,e is wrong. A is Correct.
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Re: According to some analysts, the gains in the stock market [#permalink] New post 06 Sep 2013, 13:32
I used the split between AE and BCD because of the starting phrase "in the economy". Like another member mentioned above, BCD implies that the economy is actually doing something when truthfully, it can't because it's not a living thing.

Was I wrong in using that split?
Re: According to some analysts, the gains in the stock market   [#permalink] 06 Sep 2013, 13:32
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