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According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the

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According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the [#permalink] New post 04 Sep 2003, 14:43
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According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the
proposal to tax
away all capital gains on short-term
investments would, if enacted, have a disastrous
effect on Wall Street trading and employment.

(A) its merits, the proposal to tax
(B) its merits may be, the proposal of taxing
(C) its merits as a proposal, taxing
(D) the proposal's merits, to tax
(E) the proposal's merits are, taxing

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 [#permalink] New post 04 Sep 2003, 15:46
I would choose A.

Ask yourself, "What is to be enacted?"

In C, D, and E, it appears as if the merits "if enacted" would have a disastrous effect.

In B, "proposal of" is not idiomatic.
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Sep 2003, 05:53
I would choose D.

Reasons:
1. The mention of proposal sets you up for what it's worth AND for what the consequences will be later on.
2. "to tax" goes in parallel with "have" in the last sentence.
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 [#permalink] New post 13 Feb 2005, 10:55
A.
D/E Split the verb from the subject awkwardly and do not convey the intendede meaning of the sentence accurately. Also 'its', possessive pronoun, in A refers to the noun proposal. Proposal..., if enacted, ... works better than the rest.
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 [#permalink] New post 13 Feb 2005, 11:41
vote for "D"

what is the referent of "its" in "A"-- unclear
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Re: SC -proposal..Tough one! [#permalink] New post 14 Feb 2005, 05:06
Praetorian wrote:
According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the
proposal to tax
away all capital gains on short-term
investments would, if enacted, have a disastrous
effect on Wall Street trading and employment.

(A) its merits, the proposal to tax
(B) its merits may be, the proposal of taxing
(C) its merits as a proposal, taxing
(D) the proposal's merits, to tax
(E) the proposal's merits are, taxing

thanks
praetorian


My ans. is D. Reason:

(1) I don't think the word 'propose' goes with 'to'? e.g.
The president proposed to build a new theatre. (Wrong)

I rather think 'propose' goes with a gerund (except one is proposing to a girl, like some will do today e.g. He proposed to me) e.g.

The president proposed building a new theatre. (Right)

(2) Prae says the question is tough, so i didn't exactly fall for A, if it is a trap. :wink:

But really, can a pronoun come before its antecendent, even though the antecedent appears immediately after the pronoun? i've seen such constructs a lot and the always look cool to me.

OA?
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Feb 2005, 05:15
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A it is

A) According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the proposal to tax away all capital gains on short-term investments would, if enacted, have a disastrous effect on Wall Street trading and employment.

In red is a parenthetical element. Remove it and you get:
According to some analysts, the proposal to tax away all capital gains on short-term investments would, if enacted, have a disastrous effect on Wall Street trading and employment.

This properly establish the subject of the main clause as "the proposal" for only "a proposal" can be "enacted". C, D and E erroneously say that it is the action of "taxing" which could be "enacted". Finally, B is out because proper idiom is "proposal to + infinitive" instead of "proposal for"

:btw it is ok to have a pronoun antecede the noun it is supposed to refer to.
eg Despite his generosity, Rob could not give his car away --> perfectly fine
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Feb 2005, 07:33
Paul wrote:
A it is

A) According to some analysts, whatever its merits, the proposal to tax away all capital gains on short-term investments would, if enacted, have a disastrous effect on Wall Street trading and employment.

In red is a parenthetical element. Remove it and you get:
According to some analysts, the proposal to tax away all capital gains on short-term investments would, if enacted, have a disastrous effect on Wall Street trading and employment.

This properly establish the subject of the main clause as "the proposal" for only "a proposal" can be "enacted". C, D and E erroneously say that it is the action of "taxing" which could be "enacted". Finally, B is out because proper idiom is "proposal to + infinitive" instead of "proposal for"

:btw it is ok to have a pronoun antecede the noun it is supposed to refer to.
eg Despite his generosity, Rob could not give his car away --> perfectly fine


It has to be A.
Excellent explaination Paul........
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Re: SC -proposal..Tough one! [#permalink] New post 14 Feb 2005, 08:43
A. Whatever its merits, the proposal to tax sucks.
B. Whatever its merits may be, the proposal of taxing sucks.
C. Whatever its merits as a proposal, taxing sucks.
D. Whatever the proposal's merits, to tax sucks.
E. Whatever the proposal's merits are, taxing sucks.

I would choose B because I feel "whatever" should lead a complete sentence. E is not as good because it lacks of a connection between "the proposal" and "taxing".
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Feb 2005, 09:32
B also has redundancy problem.
When one says "whatever its merits", you automatically imply that "whatever those merits [may be]"
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Feb 2005, 09:37
Paul wrote:
B is out because proper idiom is "proposal to + infinitive" instead of "proposal for"



But B used "proposal of", not "proposal for". Is that wrong as well?
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Feb 2005, 09:46
Sorry, I meant "proposal of + gerund" is not as good as "proposal to + infinitive"
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Feb 2005, 10:18
Good explanations Paul. I am still not sure as to why C is wrong.

in C

isn't the prepositional phrase "taxing away all capital gains on short-term
investments" modifying proposal conveyong the intended meaning?.

or is it wrong because of would at the end?
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Feb 2005, 11:02
C, D and E have the action of taxing as the subject. If you go on and read a bit further, you will see "if enacted". How can the action of taxing be enacted? We need a concrete noun, in this case "the proposal" itself, to be the subject of "enacted".
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 [#permalink] New post 29 May 2005, 15:24
Paul wrote:
C, D and E have the action of taxing as the subject. If you go on and read a bit further, you will see "if enacted". How can the action of taxing be enacted? We need a concrete noun, in this case "the proposal" itself, to be the subject of "enacted".



Paul could you elaborate on this please: I've gone through this entire thread and still dont know why taxing cannot be enacted? Do you mean only a "real tangible" noun [Versus Gerund] can enact something? Gerunds [such as taxing] arent "real nouns" per say, correct? And is that why "taxing" cannot be enacted?
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 [#permalink] New post 04 Jun 2005, 23:04
Though I'm not Paul, just giving my thoughts on this :stupid

Usage of 'Enact' has more to do with the dictionary meaning than to a grammatical one.

Enact:
To make into law: Congress enacted a tax reform bill.
To act (something) out, as on a stage: enacted the part of the parent

Thus, a bill can be enacted, a law can be enacted, part of parent can be enacted, a script can be enacted

But scripting/parent(though a noun) cannot be enacted.

Similarly, proposal to tax capital gains can be enacted
But, taxing cannot be enacted.

Hope it helps.
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 [#permalink] New post 04 Jun 2005, 23:32
agree with sonaketu. and yes, its about time i gave you the OA. Its A. :)

A proposal, a law , a bill is enacted ...


You may come across situations where you cannot find any grammatical errors (strictly speaking) with a sentence. There are two possibilities

1. Its the correct answer.
2. the sentence is testing context, usage , meaning.

In SC, we train ourselves to look for patterns. A tough SC will go beyond patterns and test meaning and usage.
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Jun 2005, 19:39
Sonaketu gave a perfect explanation. Yes, a noun can be enacted but not a gerund because a gerund is considered an action-noun. As I previously said, only tangible nouns, things such as a law, a bill, a proposal, can be enacted, but not actions.
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Re: SC -proposal..Tough one! [#permalink] New post 19 May 2008, 22:00
I agree A is correct as "a proposal to tax" is enacted.
I agree the D and E seem to enact merits.

But I am still lost on C.
Can someone please elaborate.
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Re: SC -proposal..Tough one! [#permalink] New post 17 Jun 2008, 06:27
Isn't ITS an incorrect modifier as it could refer to Wall Street Trading or Employment?
Re: SC -proposal..Tough one!   [#permalink] 17 Jun 2008, 06:27
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