Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 22 Nov 2014, 05:17

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

According to the professors philosophy, the antidote to envy

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Retired Moderator
User avatar
Status: The last round
Joined: 18 Jun 2009
Posts: 1317
Concentration: Strategy, General Management
GMAT 1: 680 Q48 V34
Followers: 60

Kudos [?]: 510 [0], given: 157

GMAT ToolKit User
According to the professors philosophy, the antidote to envy [#permalink] New post 03 Sep 2009, 13:00
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

43% (01:19) correct 57% (01:24) wrong based on 25 sessions
According to the professor’s philosophy, the antidote to envy is one’s own work, always one’s own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it.
(A) one’s own work, always one’s own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it
(B) always work; because you don’t think about it or assess it, you just do it
(C) always one’s own work: not thinking about or assessing it, but simply to do it
(D) not to think or assess, but doing one’s own work
(E) neither to think about one’s own work nor to assess it, it is always simply doing it

Guys this question has made me crazy. Kindly suggest your choice with explanation.
_________________

[ From 470 to 680-My Story ] [ My Last Month Before Test ]
[ GMAT Prep Analysis Tool ] [ US. Business School Dashboard ] [ Int. Business School Dashboard ]

I Can, I Will

Take a Survey about GMAT Prep - Win Prizes!

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 26 Jul 2009
Posts: 359
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 31 [0], given: 32

Re: According to the professor’s philosophy [#permalink] New post 03 Sep 2009, 19:12
I'm going with 'C'.

Parallelism> Noun: 'Envy' vs 'One's own work'.
Retired Moderator
User avatar
Status: The last round
Joined: 18 Jun 2009
Posts: 1317
Concentration: Strategy, General Management
GMAT 1: 680 Q48 V34
Followers: 60

Kudos [?]: 510 [0], given: 157

GMAT ToolKit User
Re: According to the professor’s philosophy [#permalink] New post 03 Sep 2009, 19:39
boeinz wrote:
I'm going with 'C'.

Parallelism> Noun: 'Envy' vs 'One's own work'.


What about "colon:", is it justified??

Secondly what about the second clause "not thinking about or assessing it, but simply to do it"
Is this caluse parallel???

I dont think so
_________________

[ From 470 to 680-My Story ] [ My Last Month Before Test ]
[ GMAT Prep Analysis Tool ] [ US. Business School Dashboard ] [ Int. Business School Dashboard ]

I Can, I Will

Take a Survey about GMAT Prep - Win Prizes!

Retired Moderator
User avatar
Status: The last round
Joined: 18 Jun 2009
Posts: 1317
Concentration: Strategy, General Management
GMAT 1: 680 Q48 V34
Followers: 60

Kudos [?]: 510 [0], given: 157

GMAT ToolKit User
Re: According to the professor’s philosophy [#permalink] New post 04 Sep 2009, 09:25
age wrote:
IMO A....


Can you mention the reasons of choosing "A"?
_________________

[ From 470 to 680-My Story ] [ My Last Month Before Test ]
[ GMAT Prep Analysis Tool ] [ US. Business School Dashboard ] [ Int. Business School Dashboard ]

I Can, I Will

Take a Survey about GMAT Prep - Win Prizes!

1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 15 Jun 2009
Posts: 164
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 23 [1] , given: 8

Re: According to the professor’s philosophy [#permalink] New post 04 Sep 2009, 10:16
1
This post received
KUDOS
Hussain15 wrote:
According to the professor’s philosophy, the antidote to envy is one’s own work, always one’s own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it.
(A) one’s own work, always one’s own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it...correct all three are parallel...
(B) always work; because you don’t think about it or assess it, you just do it ...semicolon is wrongly used here...
if we use semicolon then no need of using because(sub ordinating conjuction...used for introducing dependent clause)
(C) always one’s own work: not thinking about or assessing it, but simply to do it....the three elements are not parallel
(D) not to think or assess, but doing one’s own work .....changes meaning ...
(E) neither to think about one’s own work nor to assess it, it is always simply doing it..changes meaning again..antidote to envy is "work" not "think about it..n .."

Guys this question has made me crazy. Kindly suggest your choice with explanation.


Colon is used to introduce explnation ,examples.....
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 21 Dec 2009
Posts: 268
Location: India
Followers: 9

Kudos [?]: 73 [0], given: 25

Re: According to the professor’s philosophy [#permalink] New post 19 May 2010, 02:11
Only A has a parallel construction. But A is verbose.
B: after semi colon it can mean envy or work.
C: thinking , assessing and to do not parallel
D: again to think, to assess and doing
E: to think, to assess and doing.
_________________

Cheers,
SD

BSchool Thread Master
avatar
Joined: 19 Feb 2010
Posts: 401
Followers: 20

Kudos [?]: 129 [0], given: 76

Re: According to the professor’s philosophy [#permalink] New post 19 May 2010, 06:53
Hussain15 wrote:
According to the professor’s philosophy, the antidote to envy is one’s own work, always one’s own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it.
(A) one’s own work, always one’s own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it
(B) always work; because you don’t think about it or assess it, you just do it
(C) always one’s own work: not thinking about or assessing it, but simply to do it
(D) not to think or assess, but doing one’s own work
(E) neither to think about one’s own work nor to assess it, it is always simply doing it

Guys this question has made me crazy. Kindly suggest your choice with explanation.


Well, this is really difficult one.
A is very wordy, but I think it's grammatically correct.
B looks good, but the whole section after the semicolon should be able to stand as a separate sentence and it doesn't. Otherwise is parallel tense wise.
C not parallel, "it" has unclear reference.
D not parallel.
E not parallel.
Besides, B D and E change the meaning of the sentence.

I'll go with A.

What is the OA? Does any of you know the source of this question?
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 21 Dec 2009
Posts: 268
Location: India
Followers: 9

Kudos [?]: 73 [0], given: 25

Re: According to the professor’s philosophy [#permalink] New post 19 May 2010, 09:04
OA is A. This question has been taken from 1000 sc.
_________________

Cheers,
SD

Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 24 Aug 2007
Posts: 956
WE 1: 3.5 yrs IT
WE 2: 2.5 yrs Retail chain
Followers: 55

Kudos [?]: 749 [0], given: 40

Re: According to the professor’s philosophy [#permalink] New post 06 Jun 2010, 04:23
It a close b/w A and E.

1. On GMAT, do it is always incorrect. So, B and C gone.
2. In D, not to think or assess <WHAT?>, but doing... >>>> WHAT is missing and clauses not parallel.
3. In E, parallelism is missing. Moreover, I have never seen a senetence in which a verb is followed by disjunctive phrase + <to + infinitive>:
to envy is.....neither to think about one’s own work...

So, A.

Hussain15 wrote:
According to the professor’s philosophy, the antidote to envy is one’s own work, always one’s own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it.
(A) one’s own work, always one’s own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it
(B) always work; because you don’t think about it or assess it, you just do it
(C) always one’s own work: not thinking about or assessing it, but simply to do it
(D) not to think or assess, but doing one’s own work
(E) neither to think about one’s own work nor to assess it, it is always simply doing it

Guys this question has made me crazy. Kindly suggest your choice with explanation.

_________________

Want to improve your CR: cr-methods-an-approach-to-find-the-best-answers-93146.html
Tricky Quant problems: 50-tricky-questions-92834.html
Important Grammer Fundamentals: key-fundamentals-of-grammer-our-crucial-learnings-on-sc-93659.html

Director
Director
avatar
Status: Impossible is not a fact. It's an opinion. It's a dare. Impossible is nothing.
Affiliations: Chicago Booth Class of 2015
Joined: 26 Nov 2009
Posts: 995
Followers: 15

Kudos [?]: 435 [0], given: 36

Re: According to the professor’s philosophy [#permalink] New post 06 Jun 2010, 20:57
This question is bull shit. One of the weird questions.

Thanks
_________________

Please press kudos if you like my post.

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 25 Jul 2010
Posts: 143
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 69 [0], given: 29

Re: According to the professor’s philosophy [#permalink] New post 20 Sep 2010, 13:44
I agree. I believe in the real exam, GMAT doesn't put such question.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Status: CEO in training
Affiliations: ACCA
Joined: 20 Sep 2010
Posts: 70
Concentration: Entrepreneurship, Marketing
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 11 [0], given: 2

Re: According to the professor’s philosophy [#permalink] New post 21 Sep 2010, 05:40
Hussain15 wrote:
According to the professor’s philosophy, the antidote to envy is one’s own work, always one’s own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it.
(A) one’s own work, always one’s own work: not thinking about it, not assessing it, but simply doing it
(B) always work; because you don’t think about it or assess it, you just do it
(C) always one’s own work: not thinking about or assessing it, but simply to do it
(D) not to think or assess, but doing one’s own work
(E) neither to think about one’s own work nor to assess it, it is always simply doing it

Guys this question has made me crazy. Kindly suggest your choice with explanation.


Is " is one’s own work, always one’s own work:" not awkward? always one's own work is not necessary.I think B is the 'best' answer because "you don’t think about it or assess it, you just do it" implies that its your work.
_________________

real-business-school-admissions-essay-topics-humor-78619.html#p591652

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 18 Aug 2011
Posts: 60
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 12 [0], given: 6

Re: According to the professor’s philosophy [#permalink] New post 19 Aug 2011, 08:27
Why is the part after the semicolon in B incorrect?

Can't you just change the order of sub- and main-clause and add a comma to make it correct?

I get up when the bell rings.
When the bell rings, I get up.

You just do it because you don’t think about it or assess it.
Because you don’t think about it or assess it, you just do it.
Re: According to the professor’s philosophy   [#permalink] 19 Aug 2011, 08:27
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
According to the professors philosophy, the antidote to envy quasars 1 11 Sep 2006, 01:10
According to the professors philosophy, the antidote to envy alimad 8 29 Jul 2006, 11:26
1 According to the professors philosophy, the antidote to envy shampoo 9 04 May 2006, 12:50
According to the professors philosophy, the antidote to envy nakib77 4 23 Sep 2005, 11:51
According to the professors philosophy, the antidote to envy prasad_bgv 10 05 Jan 2005, 07:35
Display posts from previous: Sort by

According to the professors philosophy, the antidote to envy

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.