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 [#permalink] New post 25 Apr 2006, 10:26
vivek123 wrote:
itishaj wrote:
but out the two senetence u hav writen...both of them are correct?if yes, which one to use under wat condition...?


To add, both are correct & convey same meaning. As Laxie said, just watch out for one of the two foms in the SCs & shoot!

Usually, SCs using subjunctive mood cut the setence with half mood part underlined. Something like this:

Legislation in the Canadian province of Ontario requires of both public and private employers that pay be the same for jobs historically held by women as for jobs requiring comparable skill that are usually held by men.
(A) that pay be the same for jobs historically held by women as for jobs requiring comparable skill that are
(B) that pay for jobs historically held by women should be the same as for a job requiring comparable skills
(C) to pay the same in jobs historically held by women as in jobs of comparable skill that are
(D) to pay the same regardless of whether a job was historically held by women or is one demanding comparable skills
(E) to pay as much for jobs historically held by women as for a job demanding comparable skills


According to the construction you hav told it should be C or D...
Legislation+ requires +employers+to bare-infinitive
C...seems better coz of the comparison.
D ..m not sure whether the comparison is logically correct.
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Apr 2006, 10:36
Idiomatic structure: .....require of Object that ( subjunctive mood )
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Apr 2006, 10:40
laxieqv wrote:
Idiomatic structure: .....require of Object that ( subjunctive mood )


But in last post u told...subject+requires+ that+ object +bare infinitive.... :?:
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Apr 2006, 10:53
itishaj wrote:
laxieqv wrote:
Idiomatic structure: .....require of Object that ( subjunctive mood )


But in last post u told...subject+requires+ that+ object +bare infinitive.... :?:


Yes, that is the case in which there's no object between "require" and "that" . It is just slightly different :)

S + require + ( of O) + that + S' + bare-infinitive.

Btw, for that SC : you must also check the usage of preposition of "pay"
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Apr 2006, 11:18
laxieqv wrote:
itishaj wrote:
laxieqv wrote:
Idiomatic structure: .....require of Object that ( subjunctive mood )


But in last post u told...subject+requires+ that+ object +bare infinitive.... :?:


Yes, that is the case in which there's no object between "require" and "that" . It is just slightly different :)

S + require + ( of O) + that + S' + bare-infinitive.

Btw, for that SC : you must also check the usage of preposition of "pay"


Thanks laxieqv for explaining in depth. This thread is really useful I have gone thru some sticky s...but since they r not active...one tends to loose focus while reading the various posts.

I got ur point...so the answer for the SC shud be..A
Legislation requires of the emplyees that pay for the jobs...
B eliminated coz of comparison b/w sinlge job n jobs.

wats d OA?
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Apr 2006, 18:13
itishaj wrote:
I got ur point...so the answer for the SC shud be..A
Legislation requires of the emplyees that pay for the jobs...
B eliminated coz of comparison b/w sinlge job n jobs.

wats d OA?

You are right :good, it is "A" :-D
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Apr 2006, 18:53
I think we can make this topic a common notebook of GMAT's grammar by summarizing notable grammar points from discussions in this forum. :) As we know, new posts will be put up everyday and the old ones will be pushed back. It's not that everyone will go through all SCs; we will unfortunately miss some important points.

Herein, I'd like to post one good grammatical point just provided by our buddy, Vivek :wink:

The theory .........:

The theory of <name of the theory>
The theory that <clause explaning the throry>
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Apr 2006, 00:18
This is from one of my posts :

Some State Department officials hope to end the border skirmish by bargaining with the new dictator, others propose the stiff imposition of economic sanctions on the country's exports, and still others demand that NATO launch a full-scale invasion.

zoom612 had a doubt regarding how we judge which all verbs need to be parallel.

Why 'hope' and not 'bargaining' in this particular case ???

Any insights from experts.
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Apr 2006, 03:52
Can someone help me with when to use each of them..

WHOSE, WHICH, WHERE

Which of these is right for the context.. or is there an always right form at all??

For eg:

Chicago, whose growth
Chicago, where the growth
Chicago, which has growth.

Another example is

My family, where there are members
My family, which has members
My family, whose members

Similarly,

A community, which has
A community, whose

Some light on this will be greatly appreciated.
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Apr 2006, 04:23
buzzgaurav wrote:
This is from one of my posts :

Some State Department officials hope to end the border skirmish by bargaining with the new dictator, others propose the stiff imposition of economic sanctions on the country's exports, and still others demand that NATO launch a full-scale invasion.

zoom612 had a doubt regarding how we judge which all verbs need to be parallel.

Why 'hope' and not 'bargaining' in this particular case ???

Any insights from experts.



Buddy, can you double-check OA for this one?!! I found an extremely similar one in OG ( SC 160 page 733, OG 10 ) which correct answer choice has "suggest reducing" . If so, OA for your SC should be C instead of E :?
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Apr 2006, 04:31
PARALLELISM: ( From what I know. Others' opinions are solicited :) )

+Whenever you sense some sort of listing in the SC, it's involved parallelism.
+ Whenever you notice structures which have the same function in a SC, check parallelism.

Make sure:
Noun <-------> noun/ pronoun/gerund
Gerund <------> gerund
infinitive <-----> infinitive
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Apr 2006, 04:44
Laxie, can you make it sticky? I don't have rights to make it sticky :?
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Apr 2006, 04:46
remgeo wrote:
Can someone help me with when to use each of them..

WHOSE, WHICH, WHERE

Which of these is right for the context.. or is there an always right form at all??

For eg:

Chicago, whose growth
Chicago, where the growth
Chicago, which has growth.



buddy, I think you already master the usage of the three :wink:
After "whose" there must be a noun.
After "where" there must be a clause.
AFter "which" can be a verb ( in case "which" plays the role of a noun) OR a clause ( in case "which" plays the role of an object)

Anyways, i think others will give better ideas :)
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Apr 2006, 04:49
vivek123 wrote:
Laxie, can you make it sticky? I don't have rights to make it sticky :?


Hik, unfortunately, i don't have that privilege,too. :(
buddy, could you please summarize the point of pronoun/ possessive noun in the other post here?!! :)
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Apr 2006, 04:55
laxieqv wrote:
remgeo wrote:
Can someone help me with when to use each of them..

WHOSE, WHICH, WHERE

Which of these is right for the context.. or is there an always right form at all??

For eg:

Chicago, whose growth
Chicago, where the growth
Chicago, which has growth.


buddy, I think you already master the usage of the three :wink:
After "whose" there must be a noun.
After "where" there must be a clause.
AFter "which" can be a verb ( in case "which" plays the role of a noun) OR a clause ( in case "which" plays the role of an object)

Anyways, i think others will give better ideas :)



Laxie, I think you didn't understand my question.
My question was, taking the example above,
if Chicago is the first word, should the second word be where or whose or which?
I am giving a full example

Chicago, where industrial growth in the nineteenth century was more rapid than any other American city, was plagued by labor troubles like the Pullman Strikes of 1894.

(A) where industrial growth in the nineteenth century was more rapid than any other American city
(B) which had industrial growth in the nineteenth century more rapid than that of other American cities
(C) which had growth industrially more rapid than any other American city in the nineteenth century
(D) whose industrial growth in the nineteenth century was more rapid than any other American city
(E) whose industrial growth in the nineteenth century was more rapid than that of any other American city
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Apr 2006, 06:42
remgeo wrote:
laxieqv wrote:
remgeo wrote:
Can someone help me with when to use each of them..

WHOSE, WHICH, WHERE

Which of these is right for the context.. or is there an always right form at all??

For eg:

Chicago, whose growth
Chicago, where the growth
Chicago, which has growth.


buddy, I think you already master the usage of the three :wink:
After "whose" there must be a noun.
After "where" there must be a clause.
AFter "which" can be a verb ( in case "which" plays the role of a noun) OR a clause ( in case "which" plays the role of an object)

Anyways, i think others will give better ideas :)



Laxie, I think you didn't understand my question.
My question was, taking the example above,
if Chicago is the first word, should the second word be where or whose or which?
I am giving a full example

Chicago, where industrial growth in the nineteenth century was more rapid than any other American city, was plagued by labor troubles like the Pullman Strikes of 1894.

(A) where industrial growth in the nineteenth century was more rapid than any other American city
(B) which had industrial growth in the nineteenth century more rapid than that of other American cities
(C) which had growth industrially more rapid than any other American city in the nineteenth century
(D) whose industrial growth in the nineteenth century was more rapid than any other American city
(E) whose industrial growth in the nineteenth century was more rapid than that of any other American city


remgeo,
If you are talking about this particular SC, then rather than where/whose/which, there are other problems in the choices which decide the fate of each choice.
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Apr 2006, 06:50
yes vivek, you are right !! :oops: :oops:
bad example :(
Lemme see if I can dig out something else. I often get caught in this. But I'm not able to think of a scenario now.
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Apr 2006, 06:51
Possessive Noun And Pronoun Reference

"The department of labor allows the investment officers' fees to be based on the performance of the funds they manage"

In the sentence above, "they" can't refer to "officers". "officers" is used as a possessive noun to modify "fees".
Whereas, in the sentence below, "they" refers to "officers"

"The department of labor allows the fees of investment officers to be based on the performance of the funds they manage"

This concept is also explained in the OG (10th Edition) for SC No. 90
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Apr 2006, 03:56
Vivek buddy, thank you for the summary!! I have to admit that you have a very meticulous reading the OG :wink:

Verb + object + "to be" : "they're presumed to be"

We can use this structure for verbs such as acknowledge, assume, believe, calculate, consider, declare, discover, find, imagine, judge, know, prove, see, show , suppose, take, think and understand. " to be" can be omitted.

Ex: They have found Samantha (to be) really dependable.
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Apr 2006, 05:32
Verb + gerund/infinitive:


I came across a well-tabulated list of this grammatical point:

http://www3.telus.net/linguisticsissues ... erund.html
  [#permalink] 27 Apr 2006, 05:32
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