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Aim at and aim to..which one is right

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Manager
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Aim at and aim to..which one is right [#permalink] New post 29 May 2004, 12:26
Violence in the stands at soccer matches has gotten so pronounced in several European countries that some stadiums have adopted new rules that aim to identify fans of visiting teams and that seat them in a separate area.
(A) to identify fans of visiting teams and that seat them
(B) wrong
(C) wrong
(D) at identifying fans of visiting teams so as to seat them
(E) wrong

I have a confusion with aim at and aim to. Which one to use and when.

Satya
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 [#permalink] New post 29 May 2004, 13:02
Hello Sathya

To Aim at is the right Idiom

Example :- You have to aim at 780+ to score around 750 in gmat. :-D
You have to aim at the red circle to get full points.

Example of Aim at (just for your reference).

One has to have an Aim to suceed in life. You would see that the Aim in here is not a verb. When Aim is used as a Verb, then Aim to is the right one.

I hope this helped.
Regards
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 [#permalink] New post 29 May 2004, 13:35
carsen wrote:
Hello Sathya

To Aim at is the right Idiom

Example :- You have to aim at 780+ to score around 750 in gmat. :-D
You have to aim at the red circle to get full points.

Example of Aim at (just for your reference).

One has to have an Aim to suceed in life. You would see that the Aim in here is not a verb. When Aim is used as a Verb, then Aim to is the right one.

I hope this helped.
Regards


Carsen,
Did you mean "at" follows "Aim" when "Aim" is used as Verb?
I just got confused. Thanks for your help.
Manager
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 [#permalink] New post 29 May 2004, 17:13
so which one is right. From ur explaination it sounds aim at is right and so the option D seems right. Is it?
Manager
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 [#permalink] New post 29 May 2004, 17:26
so which one is right. From ur explaination it sounds aim at is right and so the option D seems right. Is it?
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 [#permalink] New post 29 May 2004, 17:51
D is better because it tells the intension behind identifying the fans.

A makes it look like
that aim at fans
and
that aim at seating fans (awkward)
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 [#permalink] New post 29 May 2004, 18:07
But the answer is A. It is a question in 885SC SC question bank by bigB.

Any comment from SC gurus
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 [#permalink] New post 29 May 2004, 21:09
Hello Sathya

Pardon me, I did not indicate the right answer, rather I gave you the explaination on where to use AIM AT and AIM TO.

As said before, AIM AT (when used as a Verb, an action). In the original sentence it is not a Verb. When we read the sentence...

Violence in the stands at soccer matches has gotten so pronounced in several European countries that some stadiums have adopted new rules that aim to identify (this is the verb) fans of visiting teams and that seat them in a separate area.

Aim, in the above sentence is like goal, a purpose. Adopted is a verb and aim goes with this verb. Hence in the above aim to, is correct form. when you negate the words "AIM TO" from the original sentence, it still is valid anc clear. Let us negate the words AIM TO from the original and see how it fits.

Violence in the stands at soccer matches has gotten so pronounced in several European countries that some stadiums have adopted new rules to identify fans of visiting teams and that seat them in a separate area.

I hope it is clear. If need be for any clarifiation, feel free.

Hence the original sentence is the best choice.

I hope this helps.
Regards buddy.
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  [#permalink] 29 May 2004, 21:09
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Aim at and aim to..which one is right

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