Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 06 May 2016, 18:49
GMAT Club Tests

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Algebra: Solving Equations by Factoring

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 29 Jan 2011
Posts: 24
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 2

Algebra: Solving Equations by Factoring [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Feb 2011, 15:24
Hi all, I'm going through The Official Guide for GMAT Review (12th Edition). Unfortunately for me, I didn't take any math courses beyond what was required to graduate from high school.

I've hit a wall with Algebra: Solving Equations by Factoring. I'm given the following example:

x^3 – 2x^2 + x = –5(x – 1)^2:

x^3 - 2x^2 + x + 5(x – 1)^2 = 0
x(x^2 + 2x + 1) + 5(x – 1)^2 = 0
x(x – 1)^2 + 5(x – 1)^2 = 0
(x + 5)(x – 1)^2 = 0
x + 5 = 0 or (x – 1)^2 = 0
x = –5 or x = 1

I understand the first step, moving all of the expressions to one side, with 0 on the other side. I understand the next step, factoring the X. After that, I'm clueless. How the heck do you get from x(x^2 + 2x + 1) + 5(x – 1)^2 = 0 to x(x – 1)^2 + 5(x – 1)^2 = 0 ?

I tried to work backwards and did (x-1)^2. This came out to x^2 - 2x + 1... NOT the (x^2 + 2x +1) in the previous step. What am I doing wrong? Why and how are they doing what they are doing? I'm also completely clueless about the next step.

If someone can please hold my hand and explain this to me (keeping in mind that I'm a complete math moron and roll my eyes whenever the books say "so we can deduce that..."), it would be much appreciated!
Expert Post
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 6493
Location: Pune, India
Followers: 1764

Kudos [?]: 10529 [0], given: 207

Re: Algebra: Solving Equations by Factoring [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Feb 2011, 21:52
Expert's post
\(x^3- 2x^2 + x = - 5(x - 1)^2\):

\(x^3 - 2x^2 + x + 5(x - 1)^2 = 0\)

Here, you take x common from the first 3 terms. You get:

\(x(x^2 - 2x + 1) + 5(x - 1)^2 = 0\)

Now, \(x^2 - 2x + 1 = (x - 1)^2\) This is an algebraic identity which you should learn. Anyway you can easily deduce it as you already did when you got (x - 1)^2 = x^2 - 2x + 1 as you mentioned below

\(x(x - 1)^2 + 5(x - 1)^2 = 0\)

Here, (x - 1)^2 is taken common so you are left with x from the first term and 5 from the second one.

(x + 5)(x - 1)^2 = 0

Product of 2 factors is 0. It means at least one of them has to be 0. e.g. you say if x*y = 0, either x or y or both should be 0. Otherwise you will not get the product 0. Same logic with factors.

x + 5 = 0 or (x – 1)^2 = 0
x = –5 or x = 1

Piece of Advice: OG12 will not give you the required theory. It is good for practice problems only. Since your concepts are rusty, get some basic algebra book e.g. we explain basic Math fundamentals in our book 'Math Essentials'. Check that out or any other basic Math book first.
_________________

Karishma
Veritas Prep | GMAT Instructor
My Blog

Get started with Veritas Prep GMAT On Demand for $199

Veritas Prep Reviews

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 29 Jan 2011
Posts: 24
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 2

Re: Algebra: Solving Equations by Factoring [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Feb 2011, 20:37
VeritasPrepKarishma, thank you very much!

Yes, I started to realize that doing the OG was probably not the best idea, especially since I need a lot of help with the theories. WIth that said, a friend loaned me the Manhattan GMAT books. I've been going through the number properties section, and that algebraic identity came up in a problem, but they had never explained it anywhere in the book. Very frustrating. And hard to research since I don't know what it's called... I didn't even know it was an "algebraic identity" until you mentioned it.

Is there anywhere where I can find other similar algebraic identities? While it's possible to deduce them, it's taking me forever to figure out problems because I just don't know about them. For example, I ran into...

"If n is a positive integer, is n^3 - n divisible by 4 (data sufficiency question)?"

I tried to simplify this by turning it into...
n(n^2 - n)

From there, I was stumped. Only after looking at the answer, I found out that I could and should have turned n(n^2 - n) into n(n - 1)(n + 1), which I could rearrange to be (n - 1)n(n + 1)... bingo! They're consecutive numbers! Now it makes sense. But as far as that step of turning the original equation into n(n - 1)(n + 1), I'm not clear on the rules and conditions that allow me to do this.

If there's somewhere where I can find a list and explanation of such algebraic identities/tricks/whatever they're called, please let me know!
Expert Post
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 6493
Location: Pune, India
Followers: 1764

Kudos [?]: 10529 [0], given: 207

Re: Algebra: Solving Equations by Factoring [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Feb 2011, 07:13
Expert's post
GSDster wrote:
VeritasPrepKarishma, thank you very much!

Yes, I started to realize that doing the OG was probably not the best idea, especially since I need a lot of help with the theories. WIth that said, a friend loaned me the Manhattan GMAT books. I've been going through the number properties section, and that algebraic identity came up in a problem, but they had never explained it anywhere in the book. Very frustrating. And hard to research since I don't know what it's called... I didn't even know it was an "algebraic identity" until you mentioned it.

Is there anywhere where I can find other similar algebraic identities? While it's possible to deduce them, it's taking me forever to figure out problems because I just don't know about them. For example, I ran into...

"If n is a positive integer, is n^3 - n divisible by 4 (data sufficiency question)?"

I tried to simplify this by turning it into...
n(n^2 - n)

From there, I was stumped. Only after looking at the answer, I found out that I could and should have turned n(n^2 - n) into n(n - 1)(n + 1), which I could rearrange to be (n - 1)n(n + 1)... bingo! They're consecutive numbers! Now it makes sense. But as far as that step of turning the original equation into n(n - 1)(n + 1), I'm not clear on the rules and conditions that allow me to do this.

If there's somewhere where I can find a list and explanation of such algebraic identities/tricks/whatever they're called, please let me know!


The identities and other algebra basics have been discussed in the Veritas Algebra book though if you are just looking for the identities you need to know, here they are:

\(1. (x + y)^2 = x^2 + y^2 + 2xy\)
\(2. (x - y)^2 = x^2 + y^2 - 2xy\)
\(3. x^2 - y^2 = (x + y)(x - y)\) (called difference of squares - most important one. You should be able to recognize that \(x^2 - 9 = (x + 3)(x - 3)\) etc)

and if you would like to know how they are obtained,
\((x + y)^2 = (x+y)(x+y) = x^2 + xy + yx + y^2 = x^2 + y^2 + 2xy\)

\((x - y)^2 = (x-y)(x-y) = x^2 - xy - yx + y^2 = x^2 + y^2 - 2xy\)

\((x+y)(x-y) = x^2 - xy + yx - y^2 = x^2 - y^2\)
_________________

Karishma
Veritas Prep | GMAT Instructor
My Blog

Get started with Veritas Prep GMAT On Demand for $199

Veritas Prep Reviews

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 29 Jan 2011
Posts: 24
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 2

Re: Algebra: Solving Equations by Factoring [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Feb 2011, 11:52
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
GSDster wrote:
VeritasPrepKarishma, thank you very much!

Yes, I started to realize that doing the OG was probably not the best idea, especially since I need a lot of help with the theories. WIth that said, a friend loaned me the Manhattan GMAT books. I've been going through the number properties section, and that algebraic identity came up in a problem, but they had never explained it anywhere in the book. Very frustrating. And hard to research since I don't know what it's called... I didn't even know it was an "algebraic identity" until you mentioned it.

Is there anywhere where I can find other similar algebraic identities? While it's possible to deduce them, it's taking me forever to figure out problems because I just don't know about them. For example, I ran into...

"If n is a positive integer, is n^3 - n divisible by 4 (data sufficiency question)?"

I tried to simplify this by turning it into...
n(n^2 - n)

From there, I was stumped. Only after looking at the answer, I found out that I could and should have turned n(n^2 - n) into n(n - 1)(n + 1), which I could rearrange to be (n - 1)n(n + 1)... bingo! They're consecutive numbers! Now it makes sense. But as far as that step of turning the original equation into n(n - 1)(n + 1), I'm not clear on the rules and conditions that allow me to do this.

If there's somewhere where I can find a list and explanation of such algebraic identities/tricks/whatever they're called, please let me know!


The identities and other algebra basics have been discussed in the Veritas Algebra book though if you are just looking for the identities you need to know, here they are:

\(1. (x + y)^2 = x^2 + y^2 + 2xy\)
\(2. (x - y)^2 = x^2 + y^2 - 2xy\)
\(3. x^2 - y^2 = (x + y)(x - y)\) (called difference of squares - most important one. You should be able to recognize that \(x^2 - 9 = (x + 3)(x - 3)\) etc)

and if you would like to know how they are obtained,
\((x + y)^2 = (x+y)(x+y) = x^2 + xy + yx + y^2 = x^2 + y^2 + 2xy\)

\((x - y)^2 = (x-y)(x-y) = x^2 - xy - yx + y^2 = x^2 + y^2 - 2xy\)

\((x+y)(x-y) = x^2 - xy + yx - y^2 = x^2 - y^2\)


Thanks Karishma, you've been a huge help!

Regarding my original problem, is it safe to say that it was an error in the OG? Your explanation seems to confirm that x(x^2 + 2x + 1) + 5(x – 1)^2 = 0 really should have been x(x^2 - 2x + 1) + 5(x – 1)^2 = 0.

Is there an errata list somewhere?

EDIT: Not sure why, but whenever I try to use the math symbols tag, it turns my subtraction signs into a mess.
Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 6493
Location: Pune, India
Followers: 1764

Kudos [?]: 10529 [1] , given: 207

Re: Algebra: Solving Equations by Factoring [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Feb 2011, 13:04
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
x^3 – 2x^2 + x = –5(x – 1)^2:

x^3 - 2x^2 + x + 5(x – 1)^2 = 0

Till this step, you have a '-' sign which is fine. I don't know how you got a '+' in the next step. When you take x common, the '-' sign stays as it is... Perhaps a typo at your end or in OG...

x(x^2 + 2x + 1) + 5(x – 1)^2 = 0

It should be x(x^2 - 2x + 1) + 5(x – 1)^2 = 0
It is fine after this.

x(x – 1)^2 + 5(x – 1)^2 = 0
(x + 5)(x – 1)^2 = 0
x + 5 = 0 or (x – 1)^2 = 0


P.S. - Use a hyphen for '-' sign. It will stay put.
_________________

Karishma
Veritas Prep | GMAT Instructor
My Blog

Get started with Veritas Prep GMAT On Demand for $199

Veritas Prep Reviews

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 29 Jan 2011
Posts: 24
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 2

Re: Algebra: Solving Equations by Factoring [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Feb 2011, 13:19
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
x^3 – 2x^2 + x = –5(x – 1)^2:

x^3 - 2x^2 + x + 5(x – 1)^2 = 0

Till this step, you have a '-' sign which is fine. I don't know how you got a '+' in the next step. When you take x common, the '-' sign stays as it is... Perhaps a typo at your end or in OG...

x(x^2 + 2x + 1) + 5(x – 1)^2 = 0

It should be x(x^2 - 2x + 1) + 5(x – 1)^2 = 0
It is fine after this.

x(x – 1)^2 + 5(x – 1)^2 = 0
(x + 5)(x – 1)^2 = 0
x + 5 = 0 or (x – 1)^2 = 0


P.S. - Use a hyphen for '-' sign. It will stay put.


Yes, I double-checked the OG and they went from \(x^3 - 2x^2 + x + 5(x-1)^2 = 0\) to \(x(x^2 + 2x + 1)+4(x-1)^2=0\). So, I guess it was a typo on their end. So frustrating. :roll:

I sort of figured out the problem I was having with the math tags... apparently, copy and pasting equations into here can mess things up. I retyped the equations manually and they worked fine.

Thanks again for all your help!
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 10 Feb 2014
Posts: 2
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Algebra: Solving Equations by Factoring [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Aug 2015, 16:17
karishma,

I am having problems with this as well. I don't understand when you say

"Here (x-1)^2 is taken common so you are left with x from the first term and 5 from the second one. I still don't understand what happened with the first (x-1)^2. I see where the x+5 came from though. VeritasPrepKarishma

Also I seem to be a bit rusty on my math theory. Can you suggest a good book to look at? I haven't really done any math in the last 10 years, since I left school.
Expert Post
Math Forum Moderator
avatar
Joined: 20 Mar 2014
Posts: 2605
Concentration: Finance, Strategy
Schools: Kellogg '18 (M)
GMAT 1: 750 Q49 V44
GPA: 3.7
WE: Engineering (Aerospace and Defense)
Followers: 95

Kudos [?]: 1069 [0], given: 777

Re: Algebra: Solving Equations by Factoring [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Aug 2015, 17:05
Expert's post
Mackam1234 wrote:
karishma,

I am having problems with this as well. I don't understand when you say

"Here (x-1)^2 is taken common so you are left with x from the first term and 5 from the second one. I still don't understand what happened with the first (x-1)^2. I see where the x+5 came from though. VeritasPrepKarishma

Also I seem to be a bit rusty on my math theory. Can you suggest a good book to look at? I haven't really done any math in the last 10 years, since I left school.


Try Foundations of GMAT Math by Manhattan Prep, it is a good book dealing with basics to tackle other more advanced concepts.

After you get:

\(x(x-1)^2+5(x-1)^2=0\)

Take, (x-1)^2 common from both the terms (by terms I mean, \(x(x-1)^2\) is 1 term and \(5(x-1)^2\) is the 2nd term).

So when we take (x-1)^2 common from the 2 terms, we will x from 1st term and 5 from the 2nd term left as shown below:

\((x-1)^2 (x+5) = 0\) (you can check this by applying the 'formula' \(a(b+c) = a.b + a.c\) , where \(a = (x-1)^2\) , \(b = x\) and \(c = 5\))

Finally, as you get something similar to a.b = 0 ---> this means that 1 of the 3 cases are possible: either a = 0 or b =0 or a =b=0 (dont worry about this case for now!))

Thus, either a = 0 ---> \((x-1)^2 = 0\) ---> \(x-1 = 0\) ---> \(x =1\) or

b = 0 ---> \((x+5) = 0\)---> \(x = -5\)

Hope this helps.
_________________

Thursday with Ron updated list as of July 1st, 2015: http://gmatclub.com/forum/consolidated-thursday-with-ron-list-for-all-the-sections-201006.html#p1544515
Rules for Posting in Quant Forums: http://gmatclub.com/forum/rules-for-posting-please-read-this-before-posting-133935.html
Writing Mathematical Formulae in your posts: http://gmatclub.com/forum/rules-for-posting-please-read-this-before-posting-133935.html#p1096628
GMATCLUB Math Book: http://gmatclub.com/forum/gmat-math-book-in-downloadable-pdf-format-130609.html
Everything Related to Inequalities: http://gmatclub.com/forum/inequalities-made-easy-206653.html#p1582891
Inequalities tips: http://gmatclub.com/forum/inequalities-tips-and-hints-175001.html
Debrief, 650 to 750: http://gmatclub.com/forum/650-to-750-a-10-month-journey-to-the-score-203190.html

Expert Post
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 6493
Location: Pune, India
Followers: 1764

Kudos [?]: 10529 [0], given: 207

Re: Algebra: Solving Equations by Factoring [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Aug 2015, 22:53
Expert's post
Mackam1234 wrote:
karishma,

I am having problems with this as well. I don't understand when you say

"Here (x-1)^2 is taken common so you are left with x from the first term and 5 from the second one. I still don't understand what happened with the first (x-1)^2. I see where the x+5 came from though. VeritasPrepKarishma

Also I seem to be a bit rusty on my math theory. Can you suggest a good book to look at? I haven't really done any math in the last 10 years, since I left school.


Conceptually, it is the same as saying

\(xy + xz = x(y + z)\) ---- you take x common out of the two terms

Similarly, if you have
\((x+1)y + (x+1)z = (x+1)(y + z)\) ---- again, you take (x+1) common

Here, you have:

\(x(x^2 - 2x + 1) + 5(x – 1)^2 = 0\)

Now, \((x^2 - 2x + 1) = (x-1)^2\) (because \((a - b)^2 = a^2 - 2ab + b^2\))

\(x(x - 1)^2 + 5(x - 1)^2 = 0\)

Take \((x-1)^2\) common

\((x - 1)^2*(x + 5) = 0\)

I would suggest you to check out your high school book before you work on any GMAT curriculum. Once you revise the basics of quadratics, linear equations etc, GMAT discussions will make much more sense.
_________________

Karishma
Veritas Prep | GMAT Instructor
My Blog

Get started with Veritas Prep GMAT On Demand for $199

Veritas Prep Reviews

Re: Algebra: Solving Equations by Factoring   [#permalink] 06 Aug 2015, 22:53
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
Experts publish their posts in the topic Any Resources for Rearranging Algebra Equations samharr1ngton 1 27 Apr 2016, 11:13
1 Experts publish their posts in the topic Solving Algebraic Expressions Jasper1989 2 07 Jan 2014, 12:33
1 Solving Simultaneous equations cyberjadugar 3 04 Jun 2012, 07:39
solving quadratic equations pro 3 08 Jun 2011, 15:15
1 Solving equation benjg 1 23 Apr 2010, 23:13
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Algebra: Solving Equations by Factoring

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.