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Although many art patrons can readily differentiate a good

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Although many art patrons can readily differentiate a good [#permalink] New post 20 Jun 2005, 05:48
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Although many art patrons can readily differentiate a good debenture from an undesirable one, they are much less expert in distinguishing good paintings and poor ones, authentic art and fakes.
(A) much less expert in distinguishing good paintings and poor ones, authentic art and
(B) far less expert in distinguishing good paintings from poor ones, authentic art from
(C) much less expert when it comes to distinguishing good paintings and poor ones, authentic art from
(D) far less expert in distinguishing good paintings and poor ones, authentic art and
(E) far less the expert when it comes to distinguishing between good painting, poor ones, authentic art, and

Follow Questions:
1) After the question could someone verify whether the following construct is valid?

I dont know how to distinguish Greek from Latin, French from Italian.

when you enumerate a list and have 2 or more elements dont you need an "and" before the last element?

Last edited by gmataquaguy on 24 Jun 2005, 08:40, edited 1 time in total.
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 [#permalink] New post 20 Jun 2005, 06:07
B.

I think, a list of that kind can be seperated by ",".
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 [#permalink] New post 20 Jun 2005, 06:32
All the answer choices are weird but the least evil is B. It correctly uses the Idiom distinguishes between
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 [#permalink] New post 22 Jun 2005, 20:06
B would be my choice....

E has also a right idiom distinguish between x and y....
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 [#permalink] New post 22 Jun 2005, 22:09
B is the best answer ...though it sounds a tad incomplete
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 [#permalink] New post 22 Jun 2005, 22:20
B is the best...but, IMO, it should have been
" far less experts"
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 [#permalink] New post 23 Jun 2005, 04:44
Vithal wrote:
B is the best...but, IMO, it should have been
" far less experts"


Although I don't think I have used it this way before, but I think "expert" is an adjective in this sentence which would explain the missing "s."

Which got me thinking, is although A, but B the correct idiom here? **Flipping through study guides**
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 [#permalink] New post 23 Jun 2005, 07:12
idiom is distinguish from....so we are left with B and C...B is much better...
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 [#permalink] New post 23 Jun 2005, 11:21
i think it's A. there is another idiom at work here. "much less expert" and parallel constuction are only in A
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 [#permalink] New post 23 Jun 2005, 19:26
should be B....but shouldnt the idiom be "distinguish between x and y" ?

also - in A - is "much" more commonly used with countable nouns ?
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Jun 2005, 08:44
Bhai wrote:
B.

I think, a list of that kind can be seperated by ",".


yes but when you have 2 elements dont you need a conjuction? Or else will it not be a sentence fragment?
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Jun 2005, 08:45
gmat2me2 wrote:
B would be my choice....

E has also a right idiom distinguish between x and y....



E changes the meaning of the sentence. The author is trying to distinguish within the "elements" and not just distinguish between element A and B.
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Jun 2005, 11:08
That is a good question.
-- I dont know how to distinguish Greek from Latin, French from Italian AND Hindi from Urdu.
Above sentence seems to be correct to me but I am not sure if you would still need to use AND when there are only two sets.

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 [#permalink] New post 25 Jun 2005, 04:12
I guess and is required. However in the given options B seems best.
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Re: SC - Debuntures [#permalink] New post 25 Jun 2005, 15:29
gmataquaguy wrote:
Although many art patrons can readily differentiate a good debenture from an undesirable one, they are much less expert in distinguishing good paintings and poor ones, authentic art and fakes.
(A) much less expert in distinguishing good paintings and poor ones, authentic art and
(B) far less expert in distinguishing good paintings from poor ones, authentic art from
(C) much less expert when it comes to distinguishing good paintings and poor ones, authentic art from
(D) far less expert in distinguishing good paintings and poor ones, authentic art and
(E) far less the expert when it comes to distinguishing between good painting, poor ones, authentic art, and


"far less expert" is the correct idiom, so eliminate A and C

"distinguish A from B" is the correct idiom. There is also a triple parallelism here.

B is my choice.

Quote:
Follow Questions:
1) After the question could someone verify whether the following construct is valid?

I dont know how to distinguish Greek from Latin, French from Italian.

when you enumerate a list and have 2 or more elements dont you need an "and" before the last element?


I'd say we do not need the "and"
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Jun 2005, 15:37
OA is B.

But why would we not have an "and" after enumerating 2 elements? Why are we not including an "and" here?
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Jun 2005, 06:36
Remember good ol' appositive phrase?

The reason why you can omit comma here is because B's form is appositive and serves as an emphasis on the previous comparison. Your previous examples with languages cannot be compared to this because it is an enumeration of distinct elements whereas this is NOT an enumeration. Instead, it is a metaphorical comparison of similar elements.

good debentures = authentic art
undesirable ones = fakes
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Jun 2005, 18:29
Paul wrote:
Remember good ol' appositive phrase?

The reason why you can omit comma here is because B's form is appositive and serves as an emphasis on the previous comparison. Your previous examples with languages cannot be compared to this because it is an enumeration of distinct elements whereas this is NOT an enumeration. Instead, it is a metaphorical comparison of similar elements.

good debentures = authentic art
undesirable ones = fakes


Ahh!! So ure saying the phrase "authentic art and fakes" after the comma is an appositive and not an enumeration and hence does not need a conjuction. This seems to make sense.

But isnt an appositive phrase supposed to modify the noun it precedes.

For e.g.,

My favorite basketball player, a good sportman in his own right.......

Here the appositive "a good sportman in his own right" provides more information on the noun player and succeeds it immediately.
In this case the phrase follows "poor ones". Ones = painting.

So if we use the appositive rule are we saying "authentic art and fakes" provides more information about "poor ones";

ones, the pronoun = painting.

Not sure how the appositive provides more information about painting. Any comments on this Paul?
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Jun 2005, 20:14
I often tend to interchange the two but you are right, this is not an appositive. Instead, it is an absolute phrase which modifies the whole preceding clause instead of the immediately preceding noun. Basically, the extraneous information is also an absolute phrase/parenthetical element. You can read on about absolute phrases here: http://cctc.commnet.edu/grammar/phrases.htm#absolute

Absolute phrase:
authentic art from fakes
is extra information given to emphasize the comparison between
good paintings from poor ones
from the IC. It is adding information to the entire clause as opposed to a single noun as the appositive would do. Nonetheless, the core concept and the purpose is the same.
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  [#permalink] 28 Jun 2005, 20:14
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