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Although this bottle is labeled vinegar, no fizzing occurred

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Although this bottle is labeled vinegar, no fizzing occurred [#permalink] New post 06 May 2008, 21:43
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Although this bottle is labeled vinegar, no fizzing occurred when some of the liquid in it was added to powder from this box labeled baking soda. But when an acidic liquid such as vinegar is added to baking soda the resulting mixture fizzes, so this bottle clearly has been mislabeled.

A flaw in the reasoning in the argument above is that this argument

(A) ignores the possibility that the bottle contained an acidic liquid other than vinegar

(B) fails to exclude an alternative explanation for the observed effect

(C) depends on the use of the imprecise term fizz

(D) does not take into account the fact that scientific principles can be definitively tested only under controlled laboratory conditions

(E) assumes that the fact of a labeling error is proof of an intention to deceive

Please explain
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Re: CR: Baking soda [#permalink] New post 06 May 2008, 22:43
prasannar wrote:
Although this bottle is labeled vinegar, no fizzing occurred when some of the liquid in it was added to powder from this box labeled baking soda. But when an acidic liquid such as vinegar is added to baking soda the resulting mixture fizzes, so this bottle clearly has been mislabeled.

A flaw in the reasoning in the argument above is that this argument

(A) ignores the possibility that the bottle contained an acidic liquid other than vinegar

(B) fails to exclude an alternative explanation for the observed effect

(C) depends on the use of the imprecise term fizz

(D) does not take into account the fact that scientific principles can be definitively tested only under controlled laboratory conditions

(E) assumes that the fact of a labeling error is proof of an intention to deceive

Please explain


D
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Re: CR: Baking soda [#permalink] New post 07 May 2008, 03:57
prasannar wrote:
Although this bottle is labeled vinegar, no fizzing occurred when some of the liquid in it was added to powder from this box labeled baking soda. But when an acidic liquid such as vinegar is added to baking soda the resulting mixture fizzes, so this bottle clearly has been mislabeled.

A flaw in the reasoning in the argument above is that this argument

(A) ignores the possibility that the bottle contained an acidic liquid other than vinegar

(B) fails to exclude an alternative explanation for the observed effect

(C) depends on the use of the imprecise term fizz

(D) does not take into account the fact that scientific principles can be definitively tested only under controlled laboratory conditions

(E) assumes that the fact of a labeling error is proof of an intention to deceive

Please explain


First I thought that everything is irrelevant, but A. Then I see why A is wrong.
I'll wait for other people explanation.
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Re: CR: Baking soda [#permalink] New post 07 May 2008, 04:22
The answer is B.

When vinegar and baking soda are mixed, it causes a chemical reaction and fizzes. It is stated that the bottle is labled vinegar and the box is labeled baking soda. When the two are mixed fizzing does not occur. The conlusion is that there is not vinegar in the bottle. But that conclusion fails to exclude any other alternatives, with the most obvious one being that maybe there is vinegar in the bottle but NOT baking soda in the box. If you mixed vinegar and flour you wouldn't get a fizzing reaction.
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Re: CR: Baking soda [#permalink] New post 07 May 2008, 04:30
gixxer1000 wrote:
The answer is B.

When vinegar and baking soda are mixed, it causes a chemical reaction and fizzes. It is stated that the bottle is labled vinegar and the box is labeled baking soda. When the two are mixed fizzing does not occur. The conlusion is that there is not vinegar in the bottle. But that conclusion fails to exclude any other alternatives, with the most obvious one being that maybe there is vinegar in the bottle but NOT baking soda in the box. If you mixed vinegar and flour you wouldn't get a fizzing reaction.


But it has exculded this alternative. Shouldn't the option be "failed to incude"?
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Re: CR: Baking soda [#permalink] New post 07 May 2008, 05:16
farend wrote:
gixxer1000 wrote:
The answer is B.

When vinegar and baking soda are mixed, it causes a chemical reaction and fizzes. It is stated that the bottle is labled vinegar and the box is labeled baking soda. When the two are mixed fizzing does not occur. The conlusion is that there is not vinegar in the bottle. But that conclusion fails to exclude any other alternatives, with the most obvious one being that maybe there is vinegar in the bottle but NOT baking soda in the box. If you mixed vinegar and flour you wouldn't get a fizzing reaction.


But it has exculded this alternative. Shouldn't the option be "failed to incude"?


No, that's where they are trying to confuse you.

Let's say you have two options that could have caused something to happen. We'll call them A and B. If you tell me you know A is the option that caused the thing to happen then you have to exclude option B.

Premise: Either the vinegar bottle or the baking soda box is labeled wrong.

Conclusion: It has to the vinegar bottle.

To make the jump from this premise to this conlusion we have to exclude the baking soda as a possibility.

This will make it clearer:

Although this bottle is labeled vinegar, no fizzing occurred when some of the liquid in it was added to powder from this box labeled baking soda. But when an acidic liquid such as vinegar is added to baking soda the resulting mixture fizzes and we know for a fact that baking soda was in the box, so this bottle clearly has been mislabeled.
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Re: CR: Baking soda [#permalink] New post 07 May 2008, 07:34
i also agree with b..its generic enough..
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Re: CR: Baking soda [#permalink] New post 07 May 2008, 08:12
prasannar wrote:
Although this bottle is labeled vinegar, no fizzing occurred when some of the liquid in it was added to powder from this box labeled baking soda. But when an acidic liquid such as vinegar is added to baking soda the resulting mixture fizzes, so this bottle clearly has been mislabeled.

A flaw in the reasoning in the argument above is that this argument

(A) ignores the possibility that the bottle contained an acidic liquid other than vinegar

(B) fails to exclude an alternative explanation for the observed effect

(C) depends on the use of the imprecise term fizz

(D) does not take into account the fact that scientific principles can be definitively tested only under controlled laboratory conditions

(E) assumes that the fact of a labeling error is proof of an intention to deceive

Please explain


This is a great question, I am between B & E. I choose B.

E - no mention of deception
D - do we know that it wasn't tested under controlled laboratory conditions?
C - I didn't think that fizz was imprecise
A - it was labeled vinegar, so it was assumed to be as such.
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Re: CR: Baking soda [#permalink] New post 07 May 2008, 08:27
Sure B.
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Re: CR: Baking soda [#permalink] New post 07 May 2008, 20:53
B
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Re: CR: Baking soda [#permalink] New post 07 May 2008, 21:26
gixxer1000 wrote:
farend wrote:
gixxer1000 wrote:
The answer is B.

When vinegar and baking soda are mixed, it causes a chemical reaction and fizzes. It is stated that the bottle is labled vinegar and the box is labeled baking soda. When the two are mixed fizzing does not occur. The conlusion is that there is not vinegar in the bottle. But that conclusion fails to exclude any other alternatives, with the most obvious one being that maybe there is vinegar in the bottle but NOT baking soda in the box. If you mixed vinegar and flour you wouldn't get a fizzing reaction.


But it has exculded this alternative. Shouldn't the option be "failed to incude"?


No, that's where they are trying to confuse you.

Let's say you have two options that could have caused something to happen. We'll call them A and B. If you tell me you know A is the option that caused the thing to happen then you have to exclude option B.

Premise: Either the vinegar bottle or the baking soda box is labeled wrong.

Conclusion: It has to the vinegar bottle.

To make the jump from this premise to this conlusion we have to exclude the baking soda as a possibility.

This will make it clearer:

Although this bottle is labeled vinegar, no fizzing occurred when some of the liquid in it was added to powder from this box labeled baking soda. But when an acidic liquid such as vinegar is added to baking soda the resulting mixture fizzes and we know for a fact that baking soda was in the box, so this bottle clearly has been mislabeled.


Hey, you see the green and brown colored boldface. "this bottle" and "this box" is different. So we should not say:
"Premise: Either the vinegar bottle or the baking soda box is labeled wrong."
And that difference leads me to reasons that the content of "this box" is fixed, that is, the author does not care about "this box". This can confirm by "and we know for a fact that baking soda was in the box"

Here is my interpretation. The author means that the result of a specific case must follow the general rule that any acidic liquid such as vinegar added to baking soda, the fizzings must occur. But that result does not occur when adding liquid in "the mislabled bottle"-the author claimed- to baking soda. It means that fizzings does not occur.

From this observation, he concluded: the bottle is mislabled.

We say the argument flawed, we say: the bottle is not mislabled with the reason in D.

Comment please! :lol:
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Re: CR: Baking soda [#permalink] New post 07 May 2008, 23:07
gixxer1000 wrote:
farend wrote:
gixxer1000 wrote:
The answer is B.

When vinegar and baking soda are mixed, it causes a chemical reaction and fizzes. It is stated that the bottle is labled vinegar and the box is labeled baking soda. When the two are mixed fizzing does not occur. The conlusion is that there is not vinegar in the bottle. But that conclusion fails to exclude any other alternatives, with the most obvious one being that maybe there is vinegar in the bottle but NOT baking soda in the box. If you mixed vinegar and flour you wouldn't get a fizzing reaction.


But it has exculded this alternative. Shouldn't the option be "failed to incude"?


No, that's where they are trying to confuse you.

Let's say you have two options that could have caused something to happen. We'll call them A and B. If you tell me you know A is the option that caused the thing to happen then you have to exclude option B.

Premise: Either the vinegar bottle or the baking soda box is labeled wrong.

Conclusion: It has to the vinegar bottle.

To make the jump from this premise to this conlusion we have to exclude the baking soda as a possibility.

This will make it clearer:

Although this bottle is labeled vinegar, no fizzing occurred when some of the liquid in it was added to powder from this box labeled baking soda. But when an acidic liquid such as vinegar is added to baking soda the resulting mixture fizzes and we know for a fact that baking soda was in the box, so this bottle clearly has been mislabeled.



Thanks gixxer, I got it. But you know where i was coming from - I thought since the argument didn't talk about/ didn't consider baking soda possibility, that means it has excluded it. My stupid line of thinking - sigh:(
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Re: CR: Baking soda [#permalink] New post 08 May 2008, 05:20
farend wrote:

Thanks gixxer, I got it. But you know where i was coming from - I thought since the argument didn't talk about/ didn't consider baking soda possibility, that means it has excluded it. My stupid line of thinking - sigh:(


Right it's like using double negatives so say yes. That's why you have to approach the question knowing they are trying to trick you.

If they said a bottle that might contain vinegar and a box that might contain baking soda were combined and it didn't fiz therefore there must not be vinegar in the bottle it would be two easy. Everyone would say what about the baking soda. It's like when a magician does a trick in one hand and he's doing something sneaky with the other hand. He wants to distract you so you don't see what's going on.
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Re: CR: Baking soda [#permalink] New post 08 May 2008, 05:26
sondenso wrote:
gixxer1000 wrote:
farend wrote:

No, that's where they are trying to confuse you.

Let's say you have two options that could have caused something to happen. We'll call them A and B. If you tell me you know A is the option that caused the thing to happen then you have to exclude option B.

Premise: Either the vinegar bottle or the baking soda box is labeled wrong.

Conclusion: It has to the vinegar bottle.

To make the jump from this premise to this conlusion we have to exclude the baking soda as a possibility.

This will make it clearer:

Although this bottle is labeled vinegar, no fizzing occurred when some of the liquid in it was added to powder from this box labeled baking soda. But when an acidic liquid such as vinegar is added to baking soda the resulting mixture fizzes and we know for a fact that baking soda was in the box, so this bottle clearly has been mislabeled.


Hey, you see the green and brown colored boldface. "this bottle" and "this box" is different. So we should not say:
"Premise: Either the vinegar bottle or the baking soda box is labeled wrong."
And that difference leads me to reasons that the content of "this box" is fixed, that is, the author does not care about "this box". This can confirm by "and we know for a fact that baking soda was in the box"

Here is my interpretation. The author means that the result of a specific case must follow the general rule that any acidic liquid such as vinegar added to baking soda, the fizzings must occur. But that result does not occur when adding liquid in "the mislabled bottle"-the author claimed- to baking soda. It means that fizzings does not occur.

From this observation, he concluded: the bottle is mislabled.

We say the argument flawed, we say: the bottle is not mislabled with the reason in D.

Comment please! :lol:


I think I may have confused you. I added the statement "and we know for a fact that baking soda was in the box" in one of my responses to show to someone else what you would need to do to exclude the possiblity of the baking soda as an option. The original argument does not have that statement which is exactly why B is the answer. In your response you said the contents of the box can be confirmed by that statement, but without that statement it cannot. Therefore we do not know what is in the box and it is a possiblity that we must exclude if we want to reach the authors conclusion.
Re: CR: Baking soda   [#permalink] 08 May 2008, 05:26
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