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Although wood-burning stoves are more efficient than open

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Although wood-burning stoves are more efficient than open [#permalink] New post 06 Sep 2006, 11:04
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Although wood-burning stoves are more efficient than open fireplaces, they are also more dangerous. The smoke that wood-burning stoves release up the chimney is cooler than the smoke from an open flame. Thus it travels more slowly and deposits more creosote, a flammable substance that can clog a chimney—or worse, ignite inside it.
Which one of the following, if true, most seriously weakens the augment?
(A) The most efficient wood-burning stoves produce less creosote than do many open fireplaces.
(B) The amount of creosote produced depends not only on the type of flame but on how often the stove or fireplace is used.
(C) Open fireplaces pose more risk of severe accidents inside the home than do wood-burning stoves.
(D) Open fireplaces also produce a large amount of creosote residue.
(E) Homeowners in warm climates rarely use fireplaces or wood-burning stoves.
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Sep 2006, 11:16
C looks pretty straightforward...
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Sep 2006, 11:43
YUp C.
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Re: CR:wood-burning stoves [#permalink] New post 06 Sep 2006, 18:19
gmacvik wrote:
Although wood-burning stoves are more efficient than open fireplaces, they are also more dangerous. The smoke that wood-burning stoves release up the chimney is cooler than the smoke from an open flame. Thus it travels more slowly and deposits more creosote, a flammable substance that can clog a chimney—or worse, ignite inside it.
Which one of the following, if true, most seriously weakens the augment?
(A) The most efficient wood-burning stoves produce less creosote than do many open fireplaces.
(B) The amount of creosote produced depends not only on the type of flame but on how often the stove or fireplace is used.
(C) Open fireplaces pose more risk of severe accidents inside the home than do wood-burning stoves.
(D) Open fireplaces also produce a large amount of creosote residue.
(E) Homeowners in warm climates rarely use fireplaces or wood-burning stoves.


caught between (A) and (C)

A==>only most efficient wood-burning stoves produce less creosote...how about the common one ?----OUT

go for (C)
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Sep 2006, 18:27
i don't think C in this case
We just talk about creosote and because WB stoves produce less creosote so
it doesn't matter if bigger proportion of creosote is deposited than fireplace
A it is
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Sep 2006, 18:58
I picked A. :oops: However C looks right...
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Sep 2006, 19:05
Will go with C. Wood-burning stoves may cause ignition in chimney. But open fire places can cause ignition in home itself..
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Sep 2006, 19:51
Why not B :oops:
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Sep 2006, 19:53
Being a native of a cold country, I can confirm (C) here. Sparks and embers from open fire places often "pop" out onto the floor which can easily ignite a carpeted or untreated hardwood surface. A screen helps, but obviously isn't 100% effective.
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Re: CR:wood-burning stoves [#permalink] New post 06 Sep 2006, 21:11
gmacvik wrote:
Although wood-burning stoves are more efficient than open fireplaces, they are also more dangerous. The smoke that wood-burning stoves release up the chimney is cooler than the smoke from an open flame. Thus it travels more slowly and deposits more creosote, a flammable substance that can clog a chimney—or worse, ignite inside it.
Which one of the following, if true, most seriously weakens the augment?
(A) The most efficient wood-burning stoves produce less creosote than do many open fireplaces.
(B) The amount of creosote produced depends not only on the type of flame but on how often the stove or fireplace is used.
(C) Open fireplaces pose more risk of severe accidents inside the home than do wood-burning stoves.
(D) Open fireplaces also produce a large amount of creosote residue.
(E) Homeowners in warm climates rarely use fireplaces or wood-burning stoves.



C for me.
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Sep 2006, 02:19
GMATT73 wrote:
Being a native of a cold country, I can confirm (C) here. Sparks and embers from open fire places often "pop" out onto the floor which can easily ignite a carpeted or untreated hardwood surface. A screen helps, but obviously isn't 100% effective.


Doesn't C go for refuting the argument...which should not be the case
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Sep 2006, 02:29
C for me.

Toss up between A and C, but the paragraph implies that the reason wood is more dangerous than open is the risk of ignition, ignition of the chimney would imho count as an accident inside the home, therefore if:

(C) Open fireplaces pose more risk of severe accidents inside the home than do wood-burning stoves.

this discredits.

A is a bit ambiguous, there may only be one of the most efficient wood stoves in existence and the rest may be rubbish....
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Sep 2006, 02:35
Why not B?

(B) The amount of creosote produced depends not only on the type of flame but on how often the stove or fireplace is used.

I guess its a bit of a chicken an egg style question, but you could say the usage is irrelevant. Is a gun more dangerous than a nerf ball if you don't use it? Thats one for a philosopher :lol: :roll: .
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Sep 2006, 02:40
Straight C.

A cannot be, since the text talks about the creosote that deposits inside the chimney. Open fireplaces dont have chimneys so the creosote deposits everywhere in less qties and therefore wont clog anything nor ignite. Also it talks about "many" fireplaces which doesnt match with the generalisation of the argument.
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Sep 2006, 05:26
Answer: C

Only A and C are the narrow choices.

Conclusion: WBS are more dangerous, because they deposit more creosote due to slow moving cooler smoke.

A says that they generate less creosote, but generation is different from depositing. It might generate less, but deposit more as it is cooler. Therefore, A doesn't weaken.

C on the other hand directly says that the open flame pose more risk.
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Sep 2006, 06:14
Looks like a straight C.
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Sep 2006, 10:11
OA is C guys..

We need to look for the keywords ......
Most efficient and produce vs deposit......
  [#permalink] 07 Sep 2006, 10:11
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