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An emerging hypothesis about the origins of dyslexia

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An emerging hypothesis about the origins of dyslexia [#permalink] New post 18 Sep 2013, 06:18
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66% (02:05) correct 34% (00:55) wrong based on 128 sessions
An emerging hypothesis about the origins of dyslexia proposes that the environmental distractions present in classrooms and other settings may be so overwhelming they interfere with the ability of some subjects for recognizing patterns and, the result is, to identify printed letters and words.

A.they interfere with the ability of some subjects for recognizing patterns and, the result is, to identify
B.that they interfere with the ability of some subjects to recognize patterns and, as a result, to identify
C.that they interfere with the ability of some subjects to recognize patterns and, the result, they cannot identify
D.that they interfere with the ability of some subjects to recognize patterns, and result in not identifying
E.as to interfere with the ability of some subjects for recognizing patterns, resulting in the inability to identify
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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Re: An emerging hypothesis about the origins of dyslexia [#permalink] New post 18 Sep 2013, 16:46
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gmatsheeba wrote:
An emerging hypothesis about the origins of dyslexia proposes that the environmental distractions present in classrooms and other settings may be so overwhelming they interfere with the ability of some subjects for recognizing patterns and, the result is, to identify printed letters and words.

A.they interfere with the ability of some subjects for recognizing patterns and, the result is, to identify
B.that they interfere with the ability of some subjects to recognize patterns and, as a result, to identify
C.that they interfere with the ability of some subjects to recognize patterns and, the result, they cannot identify
D.that they interfere with the ability of some subjects to recognize patterns, and result in not identifying
E.as to interfere with the ability of some subjects for recognizing patterns, resulting in the inability to identify

Dear gmatsheeba,

I'm happy to help with this. :-) This is a great question: the official questions are always so good!! (As a GMAT practice question writer myself, it always inspires me to see how good their questions are!!)

This question is loaded with idioms. Here's a free GMAT idiom ebook:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-idiom-ebook/

Idiom #1: so [adjective] that
The participle "overwhelming" serves as an adjective here. Because we have the word "so", we need the word "that". Another option would be so [adjective] as to, but that's not an option here. See:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/so-lets-talk-about-so/
Both (A) & (E) leave out the word "that", so they are incorrect.

Idiom #2: "able to"/ "ability to[/b]"
The words "able" and "ability" demand the infinitive. See:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/verbs-that ... -the-gmat/
The construction "ability to do something" is correct, and the construction "ability for doing something" is wrong 100% of the time. Both [b](A)
& (E) make this mistake, so again, we eliminate those two.

Now, it gets interesting --- the remaining choices are all grammatically and idiomatically correct, and (as it typical of a good GMAT question) we have to engage the issue of meaning. The differences are all right at the end -----
(B) "... and, as a result, to identify ...
(C) "... and they cannot identify ...
(D) "... and and result in not identifying ....
First of all, choice (C) makes a trainwreck pronoun mistake --- the first word "they" refers to the "distractions", and this word "they" at the end refers to the "subjects" --- same pronoun referring to two different antecedents in two places: a lethal pronoun mistake. Choice (C) is out. See
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-pronoun-traps/
Choice (D) has the verb "result", so the subject is "they", which stands for "environmental distractions" ---- if we plug this in, we get
".... environmental distractions result in not identifying printed letters and words" :-|
Something is funky about that ---do you see? The "environmental distractions" result in WHO "not identifying printed letters and words"??? I mean, yes, we know they mean the "subjects", but a grammatically tight sentence should leave that sort of ambiguity hanging. A good sentence say what it means and means what it says. That's what's wrong with (D).

Meanwhile, choice (B) is grammatically and logically correct, the best answer.

Does this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

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Re: An emerging hypothesis about the origins of dyslexia [#permalink] New post 18 Sep 2013, 19:46
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Hi Mike,

Thanks for the elaborate answer :)
Please press KUDOS if you liked my post !!
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Re: An emerging hypothesis about the origins of dyslexia [#permalink] New post 18 Sep 2013, 21:33
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I got this one right, after much study.
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Re: An emerging hypothesis about the origins of dyslexia [#permalink] New post 18 Sep 2013, 21:34
Great Harish :)

Please press KUDOS if my post helped !!
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Re: An emerging hypothesis about the origins of dyslexia [#permalink] New post 22 Sep 2013, 06:31
mikemcgarry wrote:
gmatsheeba wrote:
An emerging hypothesis about the origins of dyslexia proposes that the environmental distractions present in classrooms and other settings may be so overwhelming they interfere with the ability of some subjects for recognizing patterns and, the result is, to identify printed letters and words.

A.they interfere with the ability of some subjects for recognizing patterns and, the result is, to identify
B.that they interfere with the ability of some subjects to recognize patterns and, as a result, to identify
C.that they interfere with the ability of some subjects to recognize patterns and, the result, they cannot identify
D.that they interfere with the ability of some subjects to recognize patterns, and result in not identifying
E.as to interfere with the ability of some subjects for recognizing patterns, resulting in the inability to identify

Dear gmatsheeba,

I'm happy to help with this. :-) This is a great question: the official questions are always so good!! (As a GMAT practice question writer myself, it always inspires me to see how good their questions are!!)

This question is loaded with idioms. Here's a free GMAT idiom ebook:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-idiom-ebook/

Idiom #1: so [adjective] that
The participle "overwhelming" serves as an adjective here. Because we have the word "so", we need the word "that". Another option would be so [adjective] as to, but that's not an option here. See:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/so-lets-talk-about-so/
Both (A) & (E) leave out the word "that", so they are incorrect.

Idiom #2: "able to"/ "ability to[/b]"
The words "able" and "ability" demand the infinitive. See:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/verbs-that ... -the-gmat/
The construction "ability to do something" is correct, and the construction "ability for doing something" is wrong 100% of the time. Both [b](A)
& (E) make this mistake, so again, we eliminate those two.

Now, it gets interesting --- the remaining choices are all grammatically and idiomatically correct, and (as it typical of a good GMAT question) we have to engage the issue of meaning. The differences are all right at the end -----
(B) "... and, as a result, to identify ...
(C) "... and they cannot identify ...
(D) "... and and result in not identifying ....
First of all, choice (C) makes a trainwreck pronoun mistake --- the first word "they" refers to the "distractions", and this word "they" at the end refers to the "subjects" --- same pronoun referring to two different antecedents in two places: a lethal pronoun mistake. Choice (C) is out. See
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-pronoun-traps/
Choice (D) has the verb "result", so the subject is "they", which stands for "environmental distractions" ---- if we plug this in, we get
".... environmental distractions result in not identifying printed letters and words" :-|
Something is funky about that ---do you see? The "environmental distractions" result in WHO "not identifying printed letters and words"??? I mean, yes, we know they mean the "subjects", but a grammatically tight sentence should leave that sort of ambiguity hanging. A good sentence say what it means and means what it says. That's what's wrong with (D).

Meanwhile, choice (B) is grammatically and logically correct, the best answer.

Does this make sense?
Mike :-)



blown .. That was some WOW explanation man .. the elimination of choice D was very cool

P.S. I was stuck between B and D and chose D in the end .. these SC Questions were easy when I was started my GMAT preparation now as I am moving forward towards difficult and advanced topics, it is really becoming a pain .. and CR, which I thought would be really difficult is coming so easily to me that I am maintaining a 85%+ accuracy in every test I give(be it manhattan or GMAT prep)

God help me with SC
_________________

Forget Kudos ... be an altruist

Re: An emerging hypothesis about the origins of dyslexia   [#permalink] 22 Sep 2013, 06:31
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