Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 19 Sep 2014, 10:11

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Announcing that one of its key successes had been the recent

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 21 Dec 2010
Posts: 658
Followers: 10

Kudos [?]: 81 [0], given: 51

GMAT Tests User
Announcing that one of its key successes had been the recent [#permalink] New post 22 Mar 2011, 05:04
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

43% (01:44) correct 57% (00:45) wrong based on 73 sessions
Announcing that one of its key successes had been the recent well-received beta launch, the Internet start-up claimed it would introduce several new products to the web community during the next quarter.

A: its key successes had been the recent
B: its key successes has been the recently
C: its key successes is the recently
D: their key successes is the recent
E: their key successes had been the recent


between past perfect and present perfect , what should be preferred here ?
_________________

What is of supreme importance in war is to attack the enemy's strategy.

1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 09 Jul 2009
Posts: 54
Location: Bangalore
Schools: ISB
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 21 [1] , given: 27

Re: recent v/s recently [#permalink] New post 18 Sep 2011, 23:02
1
This post received
KUDOS
I still cant understand how to go about it
_________________

The only way of finding the limits of the possible is by going beyond them into the impossible.

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 05 Jan 2011
Posts: 178
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 21 [0], given: 8

GMAT Tests User
Re: recent v/s recently [#permalink] New post 22 Mar 2011, 06:12
garimavyas wrote:
Announcing that one of its key successes had been the recent well-received beta launch, the Internet start-up claimed it would introduce several new products to the web community during the next quarter.

A: its key successes had been the recent
B: its key successes has been the recently
C: its key successes is the recently
D: their key successes is the recent
E: their key successes had been the recent


between past perfect and present perfect , what should be preferred here ?


I will go with B.
well-received is an adjective and should be modified by adverb. I think this sentence looks good with both past perfect and present perfect .(jus a slight change in meaning)
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 21 Dec 2010
Posts: 658
Followers: 10

Kudos [?]: 81 [0], given: 51

GMAT Tests User
Re: recent v/s recently [#permalink] New post 22 Mar 2011, 07:28
well... the question tests both, adjective-adverb usage as well as present perfect v/s past perfect usage
_________________

What is of supreme importance in war is to attack the enemy's strategy.

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 03 Jun 2010
Posts: 184
Location: United States (MI)
Concentration: Marketing, General Management
WE: Business Development (Consumer Products)
Followers: 4

Kudos [?]: 22 [0], given: 40

GMAT ToolKit User GMAT Tests User
Re: recent v/s recently [#permalink] New post 22 Mar 2011, 10:49
I vote for (A)
Successful launch --> claim about new products --> present time
Retired Moderator
User avatar
Status: 2000 posts! I don't know whether I should feel great or sad about it! LOL
Joined: 04 Oct 2009
Posts: 1726
Location: Peru
Schools: Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, MIT & HKS (Government)
WE 1: Economic research
WE 2: Banking
WE 3: Government: Foreign Trade and SMEs
Followers: 66

Kudos [?]: 299 [0], given: 109

GMAT Tests User
Re: recent v/s recently [#permalink] New post 22 Mar 2011, 16:06
+1 B

"well-received" requires an adverb.
I think that C changes the meaning because the original intention of the author is showing that the success started in the past.

OA, please?
_________________

"Life’s battle doesn’t always go to stronger or faster men; but sooner or later the man who wins is the one who thinks he can."

My Integrated Reasoning Logbook / Diary: my-ir-logbook-diary-133264.html

Get the best GMAT Prep Resources with GMAT Club Premium Membership

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 05 Jul 2010
Posts: 205
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 18

GMAT Tests User
Re: recent v/s recently [#permalink] New post 22 Mar 2011, 16:50
WHy not C, it is simple. There is no need to have perfect tense. And I think recently fits here for modifying successes.
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 21 Dec 2010
Posts: 658
Followers: 10

Kudos [?]: 81 [0], given: 51

GMAT Tests User
Re: recent v/s recently [#permalink] New post 22 Mar 2011, 19:55
the OA is A . It is between recent (adjective) and recently ( adverb) , and an adverb CAN NOT be used to modify a noun , therefore the answer is A. I too was confused between A and B .

the second issue with the question is present perfect v/s past perfect, can anyone try and clarify that part ?
_________________

What is of supreme importance in war is to attack the enemy's strategy.

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 05 Jan 2011
Posts: 178
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 21 [0], given: 8

GMAT Tests User
Re: recent v/s recently [#permalink] New post 23 Mar 2011, 22:40
garimavyas wrote:
the OA is A . It is between recent (adjective) and recently ( adverb) , and an adverb CAN NOT be used to modify a noun , therefore the answer is A. I too was confused between A and B .

the second issue with the question is present perfect v/s past perfect, can anyone try and clarify that part ?


Can some one explain why do we need coordinating adjective here ?
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 15 Jan 2011
Posts: 64
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 15 [0], given: 20

Re: recent v/s recently [#permalink] New post 23 Mar 2011, 23:33
recent modifies the launch. wht was recent, it is the launch. so as launch is a noun, it shud be modifed by an adjective. both recent and well received modify the noun launch.
this leaves us wth option A directly.

now wht if option B also used recent? it wud still be wrong IMO as the launch already happened in the past only after which the compnay was claiming sumthng. it shud be in past tense.
and as we are having 2 events in the past (launch and claim) use of past perfect is necessary.
_________________

The only place where success comes before work is in the dictionary.

If my post made you think, KUDO it. Its easy :D

Current Student
avatar
Joined: 17 Mar 2011
Posts: 453
Location: United States (DC)
Concentration: General Management, Technology
GMAT 1: 760 Q49 V45
GPA: 3.37
WE: Information Technology (Consulting)
Followers: 11

Kudos [?]: 151 [0], given: 5

GMAT Tests User
Re: recent v/s recently [#permalink] New post 24 Mar 2011, 05:41
Answers (B) and (C) both modify the meaning of the original sentence and thus are incorrect.

In the original sentence, "recent" modifies "launch", indicating that that the launch happened recently, and it was well received.

In (B) and (C), "recently" modifies "well-received", indicating that at some point there was a launch, and it was just recently well-received.
Current Student
avatar
Joined: 17 Mar 2011
Posts: 453
Location: United States (DC)
Concentration: General Management, Technology
GMAT 1: 760 Q49 V45
GPA: 3.37
WE: Information Technology (Consulting)
Followers: 11

Kudos [?]: 151 [0], given: 5

GMAT Tests User
Re: recent v/s recently [#permalink] New post 24 Mar 2011, 05:42
If a word is used as an adjective in the original sentence, and an adverb in any of the answer choices, it should be a tip off that something is not quite right.
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 21 Dec 2010
Posts: 658
Followers: 10

Kudos [?]: 81 [0], given: 51

GMAT Tests User
Re: recent v/s recently [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2011, 21:33
@ jko and rohu , you got the adjective part right , but there is still doubt between 'has been' and 'had been' ,
what's exactly wrong with using present perfect here ?
_________________

What is of supreme importance in war is to attack the enemy's strategy.

Current Student
avatar
Joined: 17 Mar 2011
Posts: 453
Location: United States (DC)
Concentration: General Management, Technology
GMAT 1: 760 Q49 V45
GPA: 3.37
WE: Information Technology (Consulting)
Followers: 11

Kudos [?]: 151 [0], given: 5

GMAT Tests User
Re: recent v/s recently [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2011, 23:51
garimavyas wrote:
@ jko and rohu , you got the adjective part right , but there is still doubt between 'has been' and 'had been' ,
what's exactly wrong with using present perfect here ?


Answers B and C use "recently" instead of "recent as we've discussed.
Answers D and E incorrectly use the pronoun "their" to refer to the internet start-up, which is singular.
VP
VP
avatar
Status: There is always something new !!
Affiliations: PMI,QAI Global,eXampleCG
Joined: 08 May 2009
Posts: 1365
Followers: 11

Kudos [?]: 140 [0], given: 10

GMAT Tests User
Re: recent v/s recently [#permalink] New post 03 May 2011, 00:32
recent adjective is preferred.Moreover, the launch is already over hence had been is prefect usage.
Hence A
_________________

Visit -- http://www.sustainable-sphere.com/
Promote Green Business,Sustainable Living and Green Earth !!

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 17 Mar 2010
Posts: 65
Location: Hyderabad, India
WE 1: Deloitte 3 yrs
WE 2: Prok going on
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 12 [0], given: 2

Re: recent v/s recently [#permalink] New post 03 May 2011, 01:09
garimavyas wrote:
Announcing that one of its key successes had been the recent well-received beta launch, the Internet start-up claimed it would introduce several new products to the web community during the next quarter.

A: its key successes had been the recent
B: its key successes has been the recently
C: its key successes is the recently
D: their key successes is the recent
E: their key successes had been the recent


between past perfect and present perfect , what should be preferred here ?


1. The starup claimed after announcing so sentence should be in past perfect.
2. The adjective recent should be used here and not the adverb recently. Check the difference:

recent well-received
recently launched

So correct answer is A.
_________________

Akhil Mittal

I have not failed. I've just found 10000 ways that won't work. Thomas A. Edison

If my post was helpful to you then encourage me by your kudos :)

Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 21 Dec 2010
Posts: 658
Followers: 10

Kudos [?]: 81 [0], given: 51

GMAT Tests User
Re: recent v/s recently [#permalink] New post 16 May 2011, 22:28
well then, i have found the reason for past perfect and the method of handling such questions.
would is used here with claimed , so once you draw a time line of events, it becomes clear that 'had been' i.e. the past perfect is suitable
_________________

What is of supreme importance in war is to attack the enemy's strategy.

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Status: On...
Joined: 16 Jan 2011
Posts: 189
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 35 [0], given: 62

GMAT Tests User
Re: recent v/s recently [#permalink] New post 04 Jun 2011, 09:42
garimavyas wrote:
Announcing that one of its key successes had been the recent well-received beta launch, the Internet start-up claimed it would introduce several new products to the web community during the next quarter.

A: its key successes had been the recent
B: its key successes has been the recently
C: its key successes is the recently
D: their key successes is the recent
E: their key successes had been the recent


between past perfect and present perfect , what should be preferred here ?


Well this answer would have been (A)

even if we had this choice :
its key successes had been the recently

Adjective can modify Noun
Adverb can modify Verb

Here well-received beta launch is a NOUN and not VERB, so you have to go with adjective :RECENT and not adverb : REECENTLY

Coming to the use of HAD BEEN, it is parallelism....
HAD BEEN is parallel to WOULD, so this would narrow down the choices to A, E...After that ITS is the correct usage so go for A...

Cheers !!!
_________________

Labor cost for typing this post >= Labor cost for pushing the Kudos Button
kudos-what-are-they-and-why-we-have-them-94812.html

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 08 Jun 2010
Posts: 172
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 6 [0], given: 10

Re: recent v/s recently [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2011, 05:09
IT's clearly A.It is copy cat of a OG question.
A- clearly describe the sequence of events by using past perfect and simple past( it is correct too for singular noun).because successes happened is later past and claimed is happened after that .
B- need past perfect
C- ditto B
D-tense issue remain
E- pronoun agreement is issue here.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 20 Jul 2011
Posts: 152
GMAT Date: 10-21-2011
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 33 [0], given: 15

GMAT Tests User
Re: recent v/s recently [#permalink] New post 01 Sep 2011, 05:41
Quote:
Announcing that one of its key successes had been the recent well-received beta launch, the Internet start-up claimed it would introduce several new products to the web community during the next quarter.

A: its key successes had been the recent
B: its key successes has been the recently
C: its key successes is the recently
D: their key successes is the recent
E: their key successes had been the recent


between past perfect and present perfect , what should be preferred here ?


Answer: A
'recent' vs 'recently' - 'recently' is usually used to provide further information about an action.

e.g. "I bumped into Clifford recently", "The neighbors argued over the noise level recently".
It is commonly found at the beginning or the ending of a clause. E.g. "Recently, Jane met up with Jim" which can also be rewritten as "Jane met up with Jim recently". 'Recently' is further information pertaining to the meet-up.

'recent' is used when describing an event/incident.
E.g. 'The recent launch', 'The recent bird flu break-out', 'The recent news about the idiots who kayaked despite the Hurricane warning..."

Since we are talking about an event 'the launch' in this question, it should be 'recent' and not 'recently'. The other clue is that 'recent/recently' is found in the middle of the clause, thus the chances of 'recent' being correct is greater than 'recently'.
_________________

"The best day of your life is the one on which you decide your life is your own. No apologies or excuses. No one to lean on, rely on, or blame. The gift is yours - it is an amazing journey - and you alone are responsible for the quality of it. This is the day your life really begins." - Bob Moawab

Re: recent v/s recently   [#permalink] 01 Sep 2011, 05:41
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
14 Experts publish their posts in the topic Announcing that one of its key successes had been the recent Ratnakar 11 21 Mar 2013, 10:18
3 Experts publish their posts in the topic Announcing that one of its key successes had been the recent gmatbull 11 07 Sep 2010, 03:24
Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent tarek99 0 10 Mar 2008, 02:58
Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent mailtheguru 0 08 Aug 2006, 11:55
Reporting that one of its many problems had been the recent Sameer 0 01 Jun 2006, 05:51
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Announcing that one of its key successes had been the recent

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Go to page    1   2    Next  [ 23 posts ] 



GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.