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Another bummer It may be another fifteen years before

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Another bummer It may be another fifteen years before [#permalink] New post 16 Jun 2004, 12:05
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A
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C
D
E

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Another bummer

It may be another fifteen years before spacecraft from Earth again venture to Mars, a planet now known to be cold, dry, and probably lifeless.
(A) again venture to Mars, a planet now known to be
(B) venture to Mars again, a planet now known for being
(C) will venture to Mars again, a planet now known as being
(D) venture again to Mars, a planet that is known now to be
(E) will again venture to Mars, a planet known now as being
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Jun 2004, 12:29
why?
I think it should be
spacecraft ventures instead of venture. What do you think?
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Jun 2004, 13:50
Oksana,

Spacecraft can be both singualr and plural. Apparently, it's meant to be plural here. Future tenses are not used in "before" clauses so choices C and E are to be discarded. Because "a planet now known to be" modifies Mars, it should immediately follow the noun it modifies. Therefore (B) is wrong. Choice A is preferable to D because "again" should emphasize the verb (venture), not the noun (Mars).
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Jun 2004, 13:57
However, my dictionary says that spaceship is singular :roll: So...
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Jun 2004, 14:01
Sorry. It's spacecraft. But anyway it's singular
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Jun 2004, 19:38
I struggled with this one. I don't like any of the choices, but A comes closest IMO.
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Jun 2004, 21:59
I think its D....i dont know the proper explanation but it sounds right

sorry i was not logged in
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 [#permalink] New post 17 Jun 2004, 06:23
I am terribly confused here. If venture is used as an intransitive verb then D should make it. Since an adverb again will end the sentence. But known now vs now known is also bothering me.

Whats the OA?
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 [#permalink] New post 17 Jun 2004, 08:26
I concur with Ob

Thanks for the explanation (I was undecided between B and A..but am satisfied with the expl. given by Ob)
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 [#permalink] New post 18 Jun 2004, 08:39
Hi

For me, A is the best choice.

It may be another fifteen years before spacecraft from Earth again venture to Mars, a planet now known to be cold, dry, and probably lifeless.

(A) again venture to Mars, a planet now known to be - Correctly places the adverb and NOW KNOWN TO BE.

(B) venture to Mars again, a planet now known for being - absense of TO BE, (better construction)

(C) will venture to Mars again, a planet now known as being (Same reasons as B)

(D) venture again to Mars, a planet that is known now to be - Pretty close, but the adverb Venture, though sounds good, KNOW NOW TO BE is wrong. There is a difference between, NOW KNOWN TO BE and KNOWN NOW TO BE (the meaning is changed). The first one is correctly said as, 'now known to be', meaning they knew it recently about Mars temp etc... Whereas 'known now to be', means, now they know it is cold, but before they thought it was hot. Changes meaning.

(E) will again venture to Mars, a planet known now as being - Same as B

Hence A is the correct answer.

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 [#permalink] New post 21 Jun 2004, 07:24
The answer is A. But I didn'r get why spacecraft venture and not ventures :roll:
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 [#permalink] New post 21 Jun 2004, 10:34
boksana wrote:
The answer is A. But I didn'r get why spacecraft venture and not ventures :roll:


well, you can go into such details, but the first thing you should notice is there is no "ventures" in the choices. Assuming the question is ok, let me find a way to explain this. make sure, you guys check me on this.

There is no definite article to suggest that spacecraft needs singular verb
for example, if we had ....the spacecraft again ventures to Mars.... then we need "ventures".. because we know that the author talks about a particular spacecraft

( Courtesy: Purdue University)
English has two types of articles: definite (the) and indefinite (a, an.) The use of these articles depends mainly on whether you are referring to any member of a group, or to a specific member of a group:
1. Indefinite Articles: a and an
A and AN signal that the noun modified is indefinite, referring to any member of a group. These indefinite articles are used with singular nouns when the noun is general
2. Definite Article: the
A definite article is used before singular and plural nouns when the noun is particular or specific. The signals that the noun is definite, that it refers to a particular member of a group

So, here , in the absence of the definite article "the", we are sure that the author refers to spacecraft as a group ( that is, it could be any spacecraft) and thus "venture" is ok.

hope this helps .. let me know if i messed up :oops:
thanks
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 [#permalink] New post 21 Nov 2005, 11:11
Praetorian wrote:
( Courtesy: Purdue University)
English has two types of articles: definite (the) and indefinite (a, an.) The use of these articles depends mainly on whether you are referring to any member of a group, or to a specific member of a group:
1. Indefinite Articles: a and an
A and AN signal that the noun modified is indefinite, referring to any member of a group. These indefinite articles are used with singular nouns when the noun is general
2. Definite Article: the
A definite article is used before singular and plural nouns when the noun is particular or specific. The signals that the noun is definite, that it refers to a particular member of a group

So, here , in the absence of the definite article "the", we are sure that the author refers to spacecraft as a group ( that is, it could be any spacecraft) and thus "venture" is ok.



I agree the "a spacescaft" is singular, but the explanation you quote does not indicate that a noun without "a" or "an" can be plural.

I still don't understand why it is A.
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 [#permalink] New post 21 Nov 2005, 19:33
First, from the dictionary you can see that spacecraft can be singlur or plaural. When there is a, an, or the before the word "spacecraft", we will know that it is used as singlur. Without them, we know that it is used as plaural. If a noun cannot be plaural, then you can't use it without a, an or the.
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  [#permalink] 21 Nov 2005, 19:33
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