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Around three centuries ago, the prevailing attitude in most

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Around three centuries ago, the prevailing attitude in most [#permalink] New post 23 May 2013, 04:12
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Around three centuries ago, the prevailing attitude in most parts of the world was that schools must teach nothing that would belittle the authority of kings or discredit established beliefs.

(A) must teach nothing that would
(B) must teach nothing that will
(C) were to teach nothing that will
(D) should not teach anything that would
(E) must hardly teach nothing that would

Please, discuss with me more about option D. Why it is wrong. Yes. Should/must affects the meaning of line. Which one should be correct ?
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Re: Around three centuries ago, the prevailing attitude in [#permalink] New post 23 May 2013, 09:15
(A) must teach nothing that would
(B) must teach nothing that will
(C) were to teach nothing that will
(D) should not teach anything that would
(E) must hardly teach nothing that would

We are pretty much clear that WOULD should be there...therefore B and C are out

A
D --> Should is used for MORAL OBLIGATIONS...here Should is changing the meaning of the sentence. MUST needs to be used in this sentence as it represent the situuation which need to be followed by FORCE not by moral obligation.

E --> MUST HARDLY --> sounds awkward and also Hardly and nothing seems to be redundant.

Hence we are left with A
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Re: Around three centuries ago, the prevailing attitude in [#permalink] New post 23 May 2013, 12:19
umeshpatil wrote:
Around three centuries ago, the prevailing attitude in most parts of the world was that schools must teach nothing that would belittle the authority of kings or discredit established beliefs.

(A) must teach nothing that would
(B) must teach nothing that will
(C) were to teach nothing that will
(D) should not teach anything that would
(E) must hardly teach nothing that would

Please, discuss with me more about option D. Why it is wrong. Yes. Should/must affects the meaning of line. Which one should be correct ?


Hi umeshpatil

Good question. The point is "stay with the intended meaning, whether it uses must or should". I will say D is out right away. "Should" and "must" are totally different.
Must = obligation
Should = suggestion.

(A) must teach nothing that would ==> Correct.
(B) must teach nothing that will ==> Wrong
(C) were to teach nothing that will ==> Wrong. Awkward
(D) should not teach anything that would ==> Wrong.
(E) must hardly teach nothing that would ==> Wrong. "hardly" = not, so the sentence is "must not teach nothing that".


PS: Just small comment: "discuss with me about something" is not correct idiom. The correct one is "discuss something with someone". The usage "discuss" + "about" is redundant.

Hope it helps.
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Re: Around three centuries ago, the prevailing attitude in [#permalink] New post 23 May 2013, 14:09
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I have to disagree with everyone on this one. D is just fine. This does not look like a valid GMAT question. If I am describing an attitude, there is no real difference between saying "you must not" and "you should not," unless I am trying to assert a fact ("He's late, so he must not be coming.") In either version, the belief is that it should not be done. (D) doesn't lose because it "changes the meaning," as we need to look at all 5 choices to determine that meaning.

umeshpatil, where are you getting these SC questions? I suggest you abandon that source for a more reliable one!
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Re: Around three centuries ago, the prevailing attitude in [#permalink] New post 24 May 2013, 08:43
both A and D are correct.

but D can be considered wrong because D change the meaning of the original sentence. This mean we have to keep the meaning of the original sentence if it is possible to do so. However, some experts think that there is no situation in which 2 choices are correct. So, there is no situation in which we have to choose to keep the meaing of the original sentence.

I do not see any question in og, in which we have to eliminate a choice just because its meaning is different from the original meaning. all the wrong choices have grammartical problem or logic problem.
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Re: Around three centuries ago, the prevailing attitude in most [#permalink] New post 25 Feb 2014, 03:33
Hi,

what does following sentence mean ?

schools must teach nothing (object noun) (no single thing)

if nothing is a object can we ask someone to teach me nothing.

E.g : Student asked teacher not to teach.
E.g : Student asked teacher to teach nothing.

not with verb teach looks sensible, but nothing as object of the verb teach sounds weird.

Experts please shed some light on this.
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Re: Around three centuries ago, the prevailing attitude in most   [#permalink] 25 Feb 2014, 03:33
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