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Asset allocators create portfolios, often in the form of of

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Asset allocators create portfolios, often in the form of of [#permalink] New post 02 Apr 2005, 23:00
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17. Asset allocators create portfolios, often in the form of of mutual funds, with the intention to turn in good results in both “bullâ€
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Apr 2005, 23:59
I guess A

it shouldn't be C/D since
C--> no 2 verbs create and intended in a sentence
D--> break the parallelism structure in a sentence, create and intending
E is strange to me
B is too wordy
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Apr 2005, 08:11
C it is
A) portfolios cannot have any intention
C) portfolios however can be intended for some given goal
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Apr 2005, 08:14
C was pick too...
I often find "intended to" in articles etc. (don't know if familiarity always works :? )
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Apr 2005, 08:55
Paul wrote:
C it is
A) portfolios cannot have any intention
C) portfolios however can be intended for some given goal


OA is 'C'

Good Point! I overlooked it.
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Apr 2005, 21:26
I would like to go for more detail on the grammar in this question.

Asset allocators create portfolios, often in the form of of mutual funds, intended to turn in good results in both “bullâ€
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Apr 2005, 21:53
Paul wrote:
C it is
A) portfolios cannot have any intention
C) portfolios however can be intended for some given goal


But reading sentence, it seems we're supposed to be describing the investors rather than portfolios...
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 [#permalink] New post 04 Apr 2005, 06:03
C
subject: asset allocators
verb: create
object: portfolios
past participle(introducing participial phrase): intended

A
subject: Asset allocators
verb: create
object: portfolios
preposition(introducing prepositional phrase): with the intention...

The point is that in either A or C, the subject/verb/object stay similar. The difference is in the phrase which follows which are supposed to modify the noun immediately preceding them in which case is "portfolios". As you can see, once again, portfolios can be intended for X but cannot have any kind of intention as A implies
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 [#permalink] New post 04 Apr 2005, 08:14
One more question Paul :

how about using a passive past participle

Assets allocators create portfolios,...., are intended to turn in good result in both "bull" and "bear" markets
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 [#permalink] New post 04 Apr 2005, 11:50
Late but C it is . It's been previously discussed on this forum too
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 [#permalink] New post 04 Apr 2005, 11:57
Paul wrote:
C
subject: asset allocators
verb: create
object: portfolios
past participle(introducing participial phrase): intended

A
subject: Asset allocators
verb: create
object: portfolios
preposition(introducing prepositional phrase): with the intention...

The point is that in either A or C, the subject/verb/object stay similar. The difference is in the phrase which follows which are supposed to modify the noun immediately preceding them in which case is "portfolios". As you can see, once again, portfolios can be intended for X but cannot have any kind of intention as A implies


Paul,

A quick question on idiom. is "with the intention to" correct uage of English. Thanks

Good explanation

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 [#permalink] New post 04 Apr 2005, 19:50
patrickpui, "with the intention to" is an idiom but it must have a proper subject, an animate object, who can "have such an intention".

ex: Robert believed that he with intention to make a quick profit will not prevail in the long run.

subject: he--> animate object who can have an intention

tsefsnoopy, you cannot use the passive form of "to be(auxiliary) + past participle"
Assets allocators create portfolios,...., are intended to turn in good result in both "bull" and "bear" markets.
The second half of the sentence simply does not have a connector which links the second clause with the independent clause. "which" would have been good but because which could ambiguously refer to "mutual funds", the passive form is not good. Either way, you are better off with the more simple participial form which is clear and concise.
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  [#permalink] 04 Apr 2005, 19:50
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