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Astronomer: Observations of the Shoemaker-Levi comet on its

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Astronomer: Observations of the Shoemaker-Levi comet on its [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2006, 18:56
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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(N/A)

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0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 1 sessions
Astronomer: Observations of the Shoemaker-Levi comet on its collision course with Jupiter showed that the comet broke into fragments before entering Jupiter’s atmosphere in 1994, but they did not show how big those fragments were. Nevertheless, some indication of their size can be inferred from spectrographic analyses of Jupiter’s outer atmosphere. After the fragments’ entry, these analyses revealed unprecedented traces of sulfur. The fragments themselves almost certainly contained no sulfur, but astronomers believe that the cloud layer below Jupiter’s outer atmosphere does contain sulfur. Since sulfur would have seeped into the outer atmosphere if comet fragments had penetrated this cloud layer, it is likely that some of the fragments were at least large enough to have passed through Jupiter’s outer atmosphere without being burned up.

In the astronomer’s argument, the two portions in boldface play which of the following roles?

A. The first is a claim that the astronomer seeks to show is true; the second acknowledges a consideration that weighs against the truth of that claim.
B. The first is a claim that the astronomer seeks to show is true; the second provides evidence in support of the truth of that claim.
C. The first and the second are each considerations advanced in support of the conclusion of the argument.
D. The first provides evidence in support of the conclusion of the argument; the second is that conclusion.
E. The first is a circumstance for which the astronomer seeks to provide an explanation; the second acknowledges a consideration that weighs against the explanation provided by the astronomer.


OA lateR~~ :?
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2006, 19:04
I will go with C.

Conclusion:
Some of the fragments were at least large enough to have passed through Jupiter’s outer atmosphere without being burned up.

Evidence:
1.After the fragments’ entry, these analyses revealed unprecedented traces of sulfur.
2. Sulfur would have seeped into the outer atmosphere if comet fragments had penetrated this cloud layer
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2006, 19:06
B here.
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2006, 20:29
I was b/w B and C but the bottom line is that argument's conclusion focuses on the size of the fragments and both 'bothfacers' are a logical arguments to support the conclusion

so C :?: this one is the toughest out of all recent ones posted
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Re: CR : Astronomer (Boldface) [#permalink] New post 15 Jul 2006, 03:10
-- B
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 [#permalink] New post 15 Jul 2006, 03:20
I choose E
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 [#permalink] New post 15 Jul 2006, 07:33
ps_dahiya wrote:
I will go with C.

Conclusion:
Some of the fragments were at least large enough to have passed through Jupiter’s outer atmosphere without being burned up.

Evidence:
1.After the fragments’ entry, these analyses revealed unprecedented traces of sulfur.
2. Sulfur would have seeped into the outer atmosphere if comet fragments had penetrated this cloud layer


Thanks for neat explanation.

OA is C :done
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 [#permalink] New post 18 Jul 2006, 00:27
Will go with C.

The astronomer provides these assertions to support his conclusion that some of the fragments must be large enough to penetrate the cloud layer and hence did not get burned up when the entered the atmosphere.
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 [#permalink] New post 18 Jul 2006, 12:52
jaynayak wrote:
Will go with C.

The astronomer provides these assertions to support his conclusion that some of the fragments must be large enough to penetrate the cloud layer and hence did not get burned up when the entered the atmosphere.



good one.. Reached at C using POE.. I think first one is evidence rather than consideration.. But C is the best..
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Re: CR : Astronomer (Boldface) [#permalink] New post 18 Jul 2006, 13:42
Had to be C
The conclusion here is that ‘fragments were at least large enough to have passed through Jupiter’s outer atmosphere without being burned up’. The two sentences in bold are considerations which support this conclusion.
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Re: CR : Astronomer (Boldface) [#permalink] New post 19 Jul 2006, 00:23
A is out
B is out
D is out the second is not a conclusion rather support it
E is out the second is a circumstance to which astronomers try to provide explanation...

should be C
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Re: CR : Astronomer (Boldface)   [#permalink] 19 Jul 2006, 00:23
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