Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 31 Jan 2015, 01:12

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

At a business school conference with 100 attendees, are ther

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Director
Director
avatar
Status: Preparing for the 4th time -:(
Joined: 25 Jun 2011
Posts: 560
Location: United Kingdom
Concentration: International Business, Strategy
GMAT Date: 06-22-2012
GPA: 2.9
WE: Information Technology (Consulting)
Followers: 14

Kudos [?]: 794 [0], given: 217

At a business school conference with 100 attendees, are ther [#permalink] New post 22 Nov 2011, 15:34
3
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  65% (hard)

Question Stats:

59% (01:57) correct 41% (01:02) wrong based on 77 sessions
At a business school conference with 100 attendees, are there any students of the same age (rounded to the nearest year) who attend the same school?

(1) The range of ages of the participants is 22 to 30, inclusive
(2) Participants represent 10 business schools.

For me its clearcut A. Can someone please let me know if you think it not correct? OA is not provided unfortunately. :cry:
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

_________________

Best Regards,
E.

MGMAT 1 --> 530
MGMAT 2--> 640
MGMAT 3 ---> 610 :-(


Last edited by Bunuel on 12 Aug 2014, 06:30, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic, edited the question and added the OA.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 31 May 2011
Posts: 90
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, International Business
GMAT Date: 12-07-2011
GPA: 3.22
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 30 [0], given: 4

Re: At a business school conference with 100 attendees, are ther [#permalink] New post 22 Nov 2011, 23:22
enigma123 wrote:
At a business school conference with 100 attendees, are there any students of the same age (rounded to the nearest year) who attend the same school?
(1) The range of ages of the participants is 22 to 30, inclusive
(2) Participants represent 10 business schools.

For me its clearcut A. Can someone please let me know if you think it not correct? OA is not provided unfortunately. :cry:


I believe the answer should be C.

S1: Only the range of age is given. But there may be 100 different or only 1/2 colleges. In that case the answer in insufficient.
S1: Only #of B schools are given.We don't have the range of age. Insufficient

S1+S2 = we have all the data. Sufficient. hence IMO D.
4 KUDOS received
GMAT Instructor
avatar
Joined: 24 Jun 2008
Posts: 978
Location: Toronto
Followers: 276

Kudos [?]: 769 [4] , given: 3

Re: At a business school conference with 100 attendees, are ther [#permalink] New post 23 Nov 2011, 02:05
4
This post received
KUDOS
enigma123 wrote:
At a business school conference with 100 attendees, are there any students of the same age (rounded to the nearest year) who attend the same school?
(1) The range of ages of the participants is 22 to 30, inclusive
(2) Participants represent 10 business schools.

For me its clearcut A. Can someone please let me know if you think it not correct? OA is not provided unfortunately. :cry:


It's not A, because you don't know how many schools are represented. It might be that each of the 100 students if from a different school, in which case the answer is 'no', or they may all be from the same school, in which case the answer is 'yes'. Similarly Statement 2 is not sufficient, because we don't know how many ages are represented.

Using both Statements, we know that there are only 10 schools at the conference, and only 9 different ages (from 22 to 30 inclusive). Certainly it's possible that there are two, say, 28 year-olds from the same school, so the answer can be 'yes'. Can the answer be 'no'? Then we'd need every person of the same age to attend a different school. That means we could have at most ten 22 year olds, at most ten 23 year olds, and so on, and so at most 9*10 = 90 people. But we have 100 people, so it's impossible that the answer is 'no', and there must be at least two people of the same age at the same school, and the answer is C.
_________________

Nov 2011: After years of development, I am now making my advanced Quant books and high-level problem sets available for sale. Contact me at ianstewartgmat at gmail.com for details.

Private GMAT Tutor based in Toronto

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 08 Sep 2011
Posts: 77
Concentration: Finance, Strategy
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 5

Re: At a business school conference with 100 attendees, are ther [#permalink] New post 23 Nov 2011, 07:31
imo C.

Stmt 1 does not tell you how many schools there are. So all though you have a range of 9 years for 100 attendees, there could be 100 schools.

Stmt 2 is not enough for the same reason. We know that there are 10 schools but the age range could be anything.

Stmt 1 & 2: suff
CEO
CEO
User avatar
Joined: 09 Sep 2013
Posts: 3894
Followers: 252

Kudos [?]: 49 [0], given: 0

Premium Member
Re: At a business school conference with 100 attendees, are ther [#permalink] New post 09 Aug 2014, 09:41
Hello from the GMAT Club BumpBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.
_________________

GMAT Books | GMAT Club Tests | Best Prices on GMAT Courses | GMAT Mobile App | Math Resources | Verbal Resources

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 08 Apr 2013
Posts: 295
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 8 [0], given: 27

Re: At a business school conference with 100 attendees, are ther [#permalink] New post 22 Aug 2014, 01:37
very hard.

at one school, the maximum student diferent at age is 9 (there are 9 ages).

we have 10 schools,so, the number of students with different ages at different schools is 90

some school must have more than 9 students. those schools must contain student at the same age
_________________

If anyone in this gmat forum is in England,Britain, pls, email to me, (thanghnvn@gmail.com) . I have some questions and need your advise. Thank a lot.

Expert Post
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 5156
Location: Pune, India
Followers: 1251

Kudos [?]: 6079 [0], given: 173

Re: At a business school conference with 100 attendees, are ther [#permalink] New post 07 Dec 2014, 21:43
Expert's post
3
This post was
BOOKMARKED
enigma123 wrote:
At a business school conference with 100 attendees, are there any students of the same age (rounded to the nearest year) who attend the same school?

(1) The range of ages of the participants is 22 to 30, inclusive
(2) Participants represent 10 business schools.

For me its clearcut A. Can someone please let me know if you think it not correct? OA is not provided unfortunately. :cry:


Responding to a pm:

Here is how you can think:

(1) The range of ages of the participants is 22 to 30, inclusive
There could be 100 schools represented by 100 students so no two students will have the same age-school combination.
All students could be from the same school so there would be multiple same age-school combinations.
Not sufficient.

(2) Participants represent 10 business schools.
The age of the students could range from 20 to 80 so we may or may not have the same age-school combinations. Not sufficient.

Now let's consider both statements:
Ages are 22, 23 ...30 - 9 different figures
Schools are A, B, C,..., J - 10 different schools

How many unique age school combinations can we make? A22, A23, ... A30, B22, B23, ..., J22, J23, ...J30
A total of 9*10 = 90 combinations. So we can have 90 unique age-school combinations for 90 students.
Now what about the remaining 10? They must also have age between 22 to 30 and must represent schools A to J. So say for the 91st student, we pick age 25 and school C. But note that we already have a student C25 since we accounted for all combinations in our 90 combinations. So the rest of the 10 students will need to repeat the age-school combination. Hence there must be students (at least 10) who have the same age and represent the same school.

Answer (C)
_________________

Karishma
Veritas Prep | GMAT Instructor
My Blog

Save $100 on Veritas Prep GMAT Courses And Admissions Consulting
Enroll now. Pay later. Take advantage of Veritas Prep's flexible payment plan options.

Veritas Prep Reviews

Re: At a business school conference with 100 attendees, are ther   [#permalink] 07 Dec 2014, 21:43
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
2 At a certain conference, 72% of the attendees registered at actionj 6 24 Apr 2014, 21:07
1 Experts publish their posts in the topic Orange Computers is breaking up its conference attendees ... jlgdr 1 18 Sep 2013, 16:10
3 Experts publish their posts in the topic TOP 100 Business School In US With FEES and SALARY Packages highwyre237 3 10 Apr 2013, 09:14
6 At a certain conference, 72% of the attendees registered at Shawshank 13 16 Sep 2012, 23:34
Display posts from previous: Sort by

At a business school conference with 100 attendees, are ther

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


cron

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.