Baseball Analyst: Since the 2000 season, the average number : GMAT Critical Reasoning (CR)
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Baseball Analyst: Since the 2000 season, the average number

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Baseball Analyst: Since the 2000 season, the average number [#permalink]

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Baseball Analyst: Since the 2000 season, the average number of strikeouts per player has dramatically increased in Major League Baseball. The 2011 and 2012 seasons have the highest averages on record. Some writers have argue that batters, trying to hit homeruns at the same elevated rate at which they were hit in the “steroid” era, are taking increasingly larger swings, making them that much more vulnerable to striking out. But the real reason is enhanced video review. Pitchers are not necessarily any more talented than in the past, but they all watch video on each and every batter, studying his unique weaknesses, and, well-informed, are better able to exploit those weaknesses in game situations, even weaknesses of those batters with more compact swings.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the baseball analyst’s argument?
(A) Both the total number of homeruns and the average number of homeruns per batter have decreased steadily since 2000.
(B) Batters who hit more singles and have shorter swings strike out, on average, far less than the power hitters who are trying to hit homeruns.
(C) Baseball bats now, on average, are much lighter and easier to swing fast than were bats of fifty years ago.
(D) Most batters also watch video of each and every pitcher, learning to detect what pitches he throws and how he releases each pitch.
(E) Catchers and pitching coaches watch the same video that pitchers watch, and they are in a position to advise pitchers on different batters throughout the game


For more on the "strengthen the argument" question type, as well as a complete explanation of this question, please see:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-cr-st ... -argument/

Mike :-)
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: Baseball Analyst: Since the 2000 season, the average number [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2013, 00:32
I cold come down to A and E and then marked A. What is wrong in option A
:(
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Re: Baseball Analyst: Since the 2000 season, the average number [#permalink]

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bsahil wrote:
I cold come down to A and E and then marked A. What is wrong in option A
:(

Dear bsahil,
I'm happy to help. :-)

(A) is a good distractor. This is tricky --- there's the widespread argument, which associates the increase in strikeouts with the decrease in homeruns, and then this argument presents a new view, about the impact of videos. Thus, supporting this latter argument, the speaker's argument, cannot support the first argument, which the speaker opposes.

In GMAT CR, it's very important to be careful with the different voices in an argument. Many GMAT CR arguments are of the form, "many people say THING #1, but I say THING #2". It does not support this argument to support THING #1.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: Baseball Analyst: Since the 2000 season, the average number [#permalink]

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New post 30 Sep 2013, 00:28
Hi, This tread is awesome for me....Thanks...
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Re: Baseball Analyst: Since the 2000 season, the average number [#permalink]

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New post 21 Apr 2014, 09:15
Nice question but way too long

Either way I guess +1 for this...

Cheers!
J :)
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Re: Baseball Analyst: Since the 2000 season, the average number [#permalink]

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New post 21 Oct 2016, 03:53
mikemcgarry wrote:
bsahil wrote:
I cold come down to A and E and then marked A. What is wrong in option A
:(

Dear bsahil,
I'm happy to help. :-)

(A) is a good distractor. This is tricky --- there's the widespread argument, which associates the increase in strikeouts with the decrease in homeruns, and then this argument presents a new view, about the impact of videos. Thus, supporting this latter argument, the speaker's argument, cannot support the first argument, which the speaker opposes.

In GMAT CR, it's very important to be careful with the different voices in an argument. Many GMAT CR arguments are of the form, "many people say THING #1, but I say THING #2". It does not support this argument to support THING #1.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


Hi mike,

What is wrong with option D?
Can you explain the difference between D and E?
Why E is correct?
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Re: Baseball Analyst: Since the 2000 season, the average number [#permalink]

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New post 21 Oct 2016, 10:24
emmafoster wrote:
Hi mike,

What is wrong with option D?
Can you explain the difference between D and E?
Why E is correct?

Dear emmafoster,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

I will say that, within Magoosh, we discontinued this question, because answering it correctly at least may depend on some general knowledge about baseball, and for someone who, for whatever reason, knows absolutely nothing about baseball, this question could be construed as unfair. The GMAT would not do this to students.

A couple salient baseball facts of which you may or may not be aware. The pitcher throws the ball that the batter is trying to hit, so they are, in some sense, adversaries: the pitcher is trying to get the hitter to miss the ball or not to hit it well, and the batter is trying to hit is well. They have directly antithetical purposes with one another.

The core argument is that the pitchers have an advantage here because they have some extra knowledge about the batters, their adversaries. This knowledge comes from watching the videos. Knowledge is always power, and this power gives them an advantage in this athletic confrontation.

Now, let's look at (D) & (E).
(D) Most batters also watch video of each and every pitcher, learning to detect what pitches he throws and how he releases each pitch.
The prompt argument is that the pitcher's big advantage is the knowledge he has of the batter. Well, if the batter also has knowledge of the pitcher, then that seems as if it might cancel out the pitcher's advantage. It certainly doesn't strengthen the argument, because the pitcher's adversary gets the same kind of advantage that the pitcher has.
Suppose the prompt were about Company F and Company G, two rival companies, and the prompt argument said that Company F had a clear advantage over Company G because Company F has XYZ, some amazing benefit or strength. Well, if one of the choices tells us that Company G also has XYZ, that would seem to take away the reason that Company F had any advantage. That would be a weakener.
This choice is similar to that. This may be a weakener, but it certainly is NOT a strengthen, so it is wrong.

(E) Catchers and pitching coaches watch the same video that pitchers watch, and they are in a position to advise pitchers on different batters throughout the game.
Think about it. Suppose I need to know some collection of facts to do my job well. Well, if I just have to have all these facts in my head by myself and can only depend on myself, then that could be hard: especially under pressure, it's hard to remember everything one needs to know. It's an extraordinary advantage if I have helpers or colleagues who can support me, helping me to remember what I need to know, helpers who have my back in a pressure situation That's huge! That makes it much more like that, at the crucial moment of action, I will have all the knowledge I need.
The fact that the catcher and pitching coach have all this knowledge also and can remind the pitcher during the course of the game makes it much more likely that the pitcher won't forget or get confused, and therefore much more likely that he will be able to retain and apply the knowledge that gives him a competitive advantage.
This is a strengthener, and this is the OA.

Does this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: Baseball Analyst: Since the 2000 season, the average number [#permalink]

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New post 21 Oct 2016, 11:03
mikemcgarry wrote:
emmafoster wrote:
Hi mike,

What is wrong with option D?
Can you explain the difference between D and E?
Why E is correct?

Dear emmafoster,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

I will say that, within Magoosh, we discontinued this question, because answering it correctly at least may depend on some general knowledge about baseball, and for someone who, for whatever reason, knows absolutely nothing about baseball, this question could be construed as unfair. The GMAT would not do this to students.

A couple salient baseball facts of which you may or may not be aware. The pitcher throws the ball that the batter is trying to hit, so they are, in some sense, adversaries: the pitcher is trying to get the hitter to miss the ball or not to hit it well, and the batter is trying to hit is well. They have directly antithetical purposes with one another.

The core argument is that the pitchers have an advantage here because they have some extra knowledge about the batters, their adversaries. This knowledge comes from watching the videos. Knowledge is always power, and this power gives them an advantage in this athletic confrontation.

Now, let's look at (D) & (E).
(D) Most batters also watch video of each and every pitcher, learning to detect what pitches he throws and how he releases each pitch.
The prompt argument is that the pitcher's big advantage is the knowledge he has of the batter. Well, if the batter also has knowledge of the pitcher, then that seems as if it might cancel out the pitcher's advantage. It certainly doesn't strengthen the argument, because the pitcher's adversary gets the same kind of advantage that the pitcher has.
Suppose the prompt were about Company F and Company G, two rival companies, and the prompt argument said that Company F had a clear advantage over Company G because Company F has XYZ, some amazing benefit or strength. Well, if one of the choices tells us that Company G also has XYZ, that would seem to take away the reason that Company F had any advantage. That would be a weakener.
This choice is similar to that. This may be a weakener, but it certainly is NOT a strengthen, so it is wrong.

(E) Catchers and pitching coaches watch the same video that pitchers watch, and they are in a position to advise pitchers on different batters throughout the game.
Think about it. Suppose I need to know some collection of facts to do my job well. Well, if I just have to have all these facts in my head by myself and can only depend on myself, then that could be hard: especially under pressure, it's hard to remember everything one needs to know. It's an extraordinary advantage if I have helpers or colleagues who can support me, helping me to remember what I need to know, helpers who have my back in a pressure situation That's huge! That makes it much more like that, at the crucial moment of action, I will have all the knowledge I need.
The fact that the catcher and pitching coach have all this knowledge also and can remind the pitcher during the course of the game makes it much more likely that the pitcher won't forget or get confused, and therefore much more likely that he will be able to retain and apply the knowledge that gives him a competitive advantage.
This is a strengthener, and this is the OA.

Does this make sense?
Mike :-)


Hi Mike,

Thanks for the explanation!
You were right! I did this question wrong because I have absolutely no idea about baseball.
But from your explanation, I can see why D is wrong and E is right! :)

Thanks a ton!
Kudos for your wonderful explanation!
_________________

“Most of the important things in the world have been accomplished by people who have kept on trying when there seemed to be no hope at all.”

Re: Baseball Analyst: Since the 2000 season, the average number   [#permalink] 21 Oct 2016, 11:03
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