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Being a United States citizen since 1988 and born in

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Being a United States citizen since 1988 and born in [#permalink] New post 09 Feb 2009, 00:26
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A
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Question Stats:

81% (01:48) correct 19% (01:00) wrong based on 199 sessions
Being a United States citizen since 1988 and born in Calcutta in 1940, author Bharati Mukherjee has lived in England and Canada, and first came to the United States in 1961 to study at the Iowa Writers' Workshop.
(A) Being a United States citizen since 1988 and born in Calcutta in 1940, author Bharati Mukherjee has
(B) Having been a United States citizen since 1988, she was born in Calcutta in 1940; author Bharati Mukherjee
(C) Born in Calcutta in 1940, author Bharati Mukherjee became a United States citizen in 1988; she has
(D) Being born in Calcutta in 1940 and having been a United States citizen since 1988, author Bharati Mukherjee
(E) Having been born in Calcutta in 1940 and being a United States citizen since 1988, author Bharati Mukherjee
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Last edited by ankurgupta03 on 10 Apr 2014, 12:04, edited 1 time in total.
added the OA
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Re: Being a United States citizen [#permalink] New post 09 Feb 2009, 00:41
C, i think

others sound awkward
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Re: Being a United States citizen [#permalink] New post 09 Feb 2009, 08:38
See nothing wrong with A

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Re: Being a United States citizen [#permalink] New post 09 Feb 2009, 09:42
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First, I chose D . I chose C after reading the below explanation.

I found the following explantion from another forum..When I saw this question first time. I was skeptical about the usage of present perfect in option C "has lived in England and Canda" that could mean that she is living in England and Canada. Then I searched around and got this from info from a Manhattan Staff

"That is an interesting question. You are correct that the present perfect is used to discuss an event that began at some point in the past and continues to the present moment. Although I understand your interpretation that this "event" is where the author lived, the intention of the sentence is to use the entire life of the author as the "event."

For example, in my life I have lived in Boston, Atlanta, Colorado, and California. This does not mean, however, that I still live in each of these places. As my life is an ongoing event, the present perfect is an appropriate verb tense."

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Re: Being a United States citizen [#permalink] New post 09 Feb 2009, 10:04
x2suresh wrote:
First, I chose D . I chose C after reading the below explanation.

I found the following explantion from another forum..When I saw this question first time. I was skeptical about the usage of present perfect in option C "has lived in England and Canda" that could mean that she is living in England and Canada. Then I searched around and got this from info from a Manhattan Staff

"That is an interesting question. You are correct that the present perfect is used to discuss an event that began at some point in the past and continues to the present moment. Although I understand your interpretation that this "event" is where the author lived, the intention of the sentence is to use the entire life of the author as the "event."

For example, in my life I have lived in Boston, Atlanta, Colorado, and California. This does not mean, however, that I still live in each of these places. As my life is an ongoing event, the present perfect is an appropriate verb tense."


But is "and came to..." in C parallel with "has lived...."?
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Re: Being a United States citizen [#permalink] New post 09 Feb 2009, 13:06
OA is c

i also got confused with she has.....but now clear
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Re: Being a United States citizen [#permalink] New post 09 Feb 2009, 13:19
x2suresh wrote:
First, I chose D . I chose C after reading the below explanation.

I found the following explantion from another forum..When I saw this question first time. I was skeptical about the usage of present perfect in option C "has lived in England and Canda" that could mean that she is living in England and Canada. Then I searched around and got this from info from a Manhattan Staff

"That is an interesting question. You are correct that the present perfect is used to discuss an event that began at some point in the past and continues to the present moment. Although I understand your interpretation that this "event" is where the author lived, the intention of the sentence is to use the entire life of the author as the "event."

For example, in my life I have lived in Boston, Atlanta, Colorado, and California. This does not mean, however, that I still live in each of these places. As my life is an ongoing event, the present perfect is an appropriate verb tense."


I got confused with "has lived"

Thanks for the info

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Re: SC Being a United States citizen [#permalink] New post 15 May 2011, 23:30
between A and C, modifier error in A as being a USA .. and born are not even parallel too.

C is clean
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Re: Being a United States citizen since 1988 and born in [#permalink] New post 17 May 2012, 12:48
Another use of present perfect is to refer to events that happened in an idetermined time in the past..

I have been in France

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Re: Being a United States citizen since 1988 and born in [#permalink] New post 18 May 2012, 07:39
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Hi All,

Being a United States citizen since 1988 and born in Calcutta in 1940, author Bharati Mukherjee has lived in England and Canada, and first came to the United States in 1961 to study at the Iowa Writers' Workshop.

Image

• Author Bharati Mukherjee was born in Calcutta in 1940.
• She first came to the US in 1961 to study at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop.
• She became the US citizen in 1988.
• She has also lived in England and Canada.

Image

Error Analysis:

• The opening verb-ing modifier connects the author being a US citizen and being born in 1940 to her living in England and Canada, illogically implying that because she is a US citizen and because she was born in 1940, she lived in Eng and Canada and she first came to US to study in 1961. Modifier error.
o Being a singer and not being an actress, Jennifer Lopez shot to instant fame.
o Even though the OG sentence is grammatically correct, it’s not logical. So when we read a sentence, we should make sure it communicates logical meaning.

POE:

Choice A: Being a United States citizen since 1988 and born in Calcutta in 1940, author Bharati Mukherjee has: Incorrect for the reason stated above.

Choice B: Having been a United States citizen since 1988, she was born in Calcutta in 1940; author Bharati Mukherjee: Incorrect.
a. “having been…” now suggests that the author got over with being the US citizen since 1988 and then she took birth in 1940. This is absolutely illogical.
b. The first IC has just the pronoun “she”. The antecedent is actually introduced in the second IC.

Choice C: Born in Calcutta in 1940, author Bharati Mukherjee became a United States citizen in 1988; she has: Correct. The opening modifier correctly modifies the author. The IC after semicolon correctly gives additional information as to which other countries she has stayed in.

Choice D: Being born in Calcutta in 1940 and having been a United States citizen since 1988, author Bharati Mukherjee: Incorrect. Same modifier error as in A.

Choice E: Having been born in Calcutta in 1940 and being a United States citizen since 1988, author Bharati Mukherjee: Incorrect. Same modifier error as in A.

Hope this helps.
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: Being a United States citizen since 1988 and born in [#permalink] New post 09 Jan 2013, 02:25
egmat wrote:
Hi All,

Being a United States citizen since 1988 and born in Calcutta in 1940, author Bharati Mukherjee has lived in England and Canada, and first came to the United States in 1961 to study at the Iowa Writers' Workshop.

Image

• Author Bharati Mukherjee was born in Calcutta in 1940.
• She first came to the US in 1961 to study at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop.
• She became the US citizen in 1988.
• She has also lived in England and Canada.

Image

Error Analysis:

• The opening verb-ing modifier connects the author being a US citizen and being born in 1940 to her living in England and Canada, illogically implying that because she is a US citizen and because she was born in 1940, she lived in Eng and Canada and she first came to US to study in 1961. Modifier error.
o Being a singer and not being an actress, Jennifer Lopez shot to instant fame.
o Even though the OG sentence is grammatically correct, it’s not logical. So when we read a sentence, we should make sure it communicates logical meaning.

POE:

Choice A: Being a United States citizen since 1988 and born in Calcutta in 1940, author Bharati Mukherjee has: Incorrect for the reason stated above.

Choice B: Having been a United States citizen since 1988, she was born in Calcutta in 1940; author Bharati Mukherjee: Incorrect.
a. “having been…” now suggests that the author got over with being the US citizen since 1988 and then she took birth in 1940. This is absolutely illogical.
b. The first IC has just the pronoun “she”. The antecedent is actually introduced in the second IC.

Choice C: Born in Calcutta in 1940, author Bharati Mukherjee became a United States citizen in 1988; she has: Correct. The opening modifier correctly modifies the author. The IC after semicolon correctly gives additional information as to which other countries she has stayed in.

Choice D: Being born in Calcutta in 1940 and having been a United States citizen since 1988, author Bharati Mukherjee: Incorrect. Same modifier error as in A.

Choice E: Having been born in Calcutta in 1940 and being a United States citizen since 1988, author Bharati Mukherjee: Incorrect. Same modifier error as in A.

Hope this helps.
Thanks.
Shraddha


Hi Shraddha,
B is wrong because there 's no referent for she as she is mentioned in another sentence.

We have the same issue in C as well.. No mention of referent of C in the 2nd sentence after the semicolon. How is then that C is right?
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Re: SC Being a United States citizen [#permalink] New post 05 Mar 2014, 20:30
amit2k9 wrote:
between A and C, modifier error in A as being a USA .. and born are not even parallel too.

C is clean


I still dont get it why it is C. It states that "she became a citizen in 1988". Wouldn't this be different from "being a citizen since 1988" ?
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Re: SC Being a United States citizen [#permalink] New post 09 Apr 2014, 20:16
infotalk wrote:
amit2k9 wrote:
between A and C, modifier error in A as being a USA .. and born are not even parallel too.

C is clean


I still dont get it why it is C. It states that "she became a citizen in 1988". Wouldn't this be different from "being a citizen since 1988" ?


Tom has been a football player since 1988.
Tom became a football player in 1988.

What is the difference ?
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Re: Being a United States citizen since 1988 and born in [#permalink] New post 09 Apr 2014, 20:23
My Query:

Why option (A) is nullified by saying in OE/OG:

The phrases are expressed in an illogical and potentially confusing sequence

Being a United States citizen since 1988 and born in Calcutta in 1940, author Bharati Mukherjee

(1).Some poster said that 'Being'and 'born' are not parallel. However, they are indeed parallel since they are -ING and -ED modifiers modifying the author. Hence , ||.

(2). The other reason given is that -ING and -ED are being stated as a cause of the FACT that 'author Bharati Mukherjee has lived in England and Canada'.

However, in my opinion it should not necessarily be the case that the starting -ING modifier should present a causation. The starting/initial ING modifier just presents the additional fact about the following clause/author.

It perfectly says :

Being a US citizen since 1988 and born in blah blah,author has lived........

Playing basketball and tired of studying, John has done good in the sport.

Please suggest
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Re: Being a United States citizen since 1988 and born in [#permalink] New post 10 Apr 2014, 19:35
1. The parts are parallel.
2. "Being" is an exception. Like "having been", "being" is typically used to suggest a cause-effect relationship. If you think about it, in this sentence, "being" can be taken off. "A US citizen, BM..." makes more logical sense.


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Re: Being a United States citizen since 1988 and born in [#permalink] New post 10 Apr 2014, 19:47
prasi55 wrote:
1. The parts are parallel.
2. "Being" is an exception. Like "having been", "being" is typically used to suggest a cause-effect relationship. If you think about it, in this sentence, "being" can be taken off. "A US citizen, BM..." makes more logical sense.


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Hi,

Being is just another -ING modifier.

BE+ING. And you might have seen Official examples in which BEING is used as a modifier.

Further to it , What is wrong with the below?

Playing basketball and tired of studying, John has done good in the sport.

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Re: Being a United States citizen since 1988 and born in [#permalink] New post 10 Apr 2014, 21:58
Being is typically not used as a modifier on the GMAT (except to denote a cause-effect relationship, but even this usage is rare). In the given question, "being" can be eliminated without changing the meaning.
"Being" can be used thus:
Being angry will not get you anywhere.
He is being treated at the X hospital.
In these sentences, you cannot remove "being" without changing the meaning or making the sentence illogical.

"Playing basketball and tired of studying, John has done good in the sport."
The modifiers are fine. "good" should be "well". ("good" is an adjective. You need the adverb "well.")
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Re: Being a United States citizen since 1988 and born in   [#permalink] 10 Apr 2014, 21:58
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