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Bill runs a hot dog stand, and at the end of the day he has

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Senior Manager
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Bill runs a hot dog stand, and at the end of the day he has [#permalink] New post 12 Jun 2011, 20:27
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A
B
C
D
E

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73% (01:33) correct 27% (01:30) wrong based on 15 sessions
Bill runs a hot dog stand, and at the end of the day he has collected an assortment of $1, $5, and $10 bills. He discovers that the number of $1, $5, and $10 bills that he has is in the ratio of 10 : 5 : 1, respectively. How many $10 bills does he have?

(1) The dollar value of his $1 bills equals the dollar value of his $10 bills.

(2) Bill has a total of $225.
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Re: DS [#permalink] New post 12 Jun 2011, 20:51
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Answer is B.

The proportion of $1,5,10 bills is given in question, so whatever the number of bills , the proportions will stay the same.

a) insufficient - The information is redundant. the question already says, $ 1 and 10 bills are in ratio 1: 10, so whatever the numbers of these bills, their values will always be the same.

b) sufficient- consider the least case. the least amount of bills bill can have are 10 $1, 5 $5 and 1 $10 bills. now that means 10 *1 $ + 5*5 $ + 1*10 $= 10+25+10 =45 $. So bill can have total money always as a multiple of 45. Now 45*5 =225 $. so bill has 5 $ 10 bills. for every 45$ he has 1 dollar 10 bill so for 5 times 45 he will have 5 dollar ten bills.
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Re: DS [#permalink] New post 12 Jun 2011, 23:40
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$1 : $5 : $10 = 10:5:1
Values are in proportion $10:$25:$10

Stmt1:The dollar value of his $1 bills equals the dollar value of his $10 bills.
Number of dollar bills can be 10,5,1. Values are in proportion $10:$25:$10
or it can be 20,10,2. Values are in proportion $20:$50:$20. Insufficient.

Stmt2: Bill has a total of $225.
Values are in proportion $10:$25:$10
hence, amount that $1 bill contributes to $225 = 10/45 * 225 = $50. We have 50 $1bill
amount that $5 bill contributes to $225 = 25/45 * 225 =125. We have 25 $5 bill
amount that $10 bill contributes to $225 = 10/45 * 225 = $50. We have 5 $10 bill.
Ratio of bill= 50:25:5= 10:5:1.
Sufficient.

OA B.
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Re: DS [#permalink] New post 13 Jun 2011, 01:22
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siddhans wrote:
jamifahad wrote:

Stmt1:The dollar value of his $1 bills equals the dollar value of his $10 bills.
Number of dollar bills can be 10,5,1. Values are in proportion $10:$25:$10
or it can be 20,10,2. Values are in proportion $20:$50:$20. Insufficient.



OA B.



I dint get this => or it can be 20,10,2. Values are in proportion $20:$50:$20. Insufficient.


What Jamifahad is telling us that statement 1 doesn't give us any additional information that is already given in the stem.

n($1):n($5):n($10)
10:5:1

No matter which +ve integer do you multiply the above ratio, the value of $10 bills WILL ALWAYS be equal to $1 bills.

The example used:
$20:$50:$20
=
2:5:2 ----> Not what is given in the stem.

20:10:2
OR
200:100:20
would be correct.
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Re: DS [#permalink] New post 13 Jun 2011, 00:42
jamifahad wrote:

Stmt1:The dollar value of his $1 bills equals the dollar value of his $10 bills.
Number of dollar bills can be 10,5,1. Values are in proportion $10:$25:$10
or it can be 20,10,2. Values are in proportion $20:$50:$20. Insufficient.



OA B.



I dint get this => or it can be 20,10,2. Values are in proportion $20:$50:$20. Insufficient.
Re: DS   [#permalink] 13 Jun 2011, 00:42
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