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GMAT Club Legend
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Schools: Chicago (Booth) - Class of 2009
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Blogs?? [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2007, 15:57
You guys read any blogs? If so, which ones...

I've been reading

http://futurembagirl.blogspot.com/

and its filled with gems from her time at Wharton that make you take a dose of the reality pill:

For instance:

Quote:
We also got our math test scores back Thursday. I passed, but my score was also more depressed than I thought it would be. The score was about 15 points below what I expected. When I told my mother my score, she became VERY alarmed and started throwing around the idea that I might need a tutor, and that maybe I wasn't well equipped for Wharton. Well on Monday I got my test back, and low and behold, the TAs didn't give me credit for a major part the last question - they took 15 points off! So I talked to the professor, and he said I got the questions right. So in my head I know my score should be about 15 points higher, much to the relief of me AND my mother. The professor looked at me like I was lunatic when I went to his office to contest a passing score. His (sarcastic) response when I told him why I was contesting it was, "Well, I can write 100 on there if you want." So I'm a little bit anal... what can you do?

I have given up the pursuit of waiving out of stats and have decided to focus on placing into the quarter long (versus the semester long) accounting class. With a little bit of effort, I think I could waive out of stats, but I value sleep too much. Hopefully this somewhat lazy decision will not bite me in the ass later this year.


Other great tidbits:

Quote:

Today, I went to my first official preterm class. This morning I attended a three hour long session of Math Boot Camp. The point of the math class is to help get everyone on a level playing field for the very quant intensive coursework at Wharton. The class started with the professor going over what a function was. I didn't expect the class to go to THAT basic of a level, so I was feeling all smart and superior. And then after the break the prof went started talking about logarithmic functions. And that's where he lost me. He was trying to make sure we understood the WHY not just the what of logs. I didn't get it. One thing I did learn though - never feel like your too smart or too superior at Wharton!


and

Quote:

Preterm has been truckin' along for almost a week, and yesterday was the first night I actually studied. Before then, I hadn't quite made the connection that I need to study during the down times. Just because you have 3 hours off between classes does not mean you should go shopping or just hang out.



(always fun to watch reality set in isnt it?)

And this is HARSH:

Quote:
I've been studying in study groups to prepare for the big Math test coming up next week. Wharton tests incoming MBAs to check that we have a basic proficiency in math. You take the test until you pass it, and apparently everyone eventually passes. BUT, if you fail the test twice, you have to take a semester long math class with the undergraduates. Not that there's anything wrong with taking classes with undergraduates - but taking calculus with a bunch of 18 and 19 year olds may be a bit much for old heads like me. So I'm working quite diligently to make sure I pass the test the first time.


and this one is pretty telling of MBA life:

Quote:
Before I started at Wharton, a (now) second year described her first year experience as trying to drink water from a fire hose. At the time I thought she was being a little dramatic. I thought it couldn't be that bad. After all I'd been warned about situations before and survived (like the proverbial, "look to your left, look to your right - one of these people won't be here at graduation.") No matter how bad a situatuation was I always perservered. Surely Wharton wouldn't be any different, I thought. Surely it couldn't be that bad.

Well. It can be that bad.

I was FINE until this week. And then they layered on all this school work and getting job and extracurricular stuff. And now I'm running around like an unorganized chicken with her head cut off. This truly is hell week.


Quote:

Black Tuesday approacheth... For some reason every core professor has an affinity for October 5. Because they all have something due on that day. That fact, coupled with the ramping up of the recruiting season has taken my stress level up a couple of notches. I had a small panic attack on Wednesday when I realized I didn't know about 95 of the recruiting events going on next week. And it seemed everyone else was on the ball. AND I still have to draft my resume for review. And do my homework and reading. And the marketing case. And the accounting case. And try out for Follies (thanks for the joke Naveen; if I'm feeling racy I'll use that one!).


All this while trying not to fail out of Wharton. It will be an interesting week!



Quote:
A second year suggested recently that a first year MBA student should let extremely needy people know that he or she will not be talking to them for the next two years. This should happen AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. I would agree with that advice. Needy people can be annoying when all you are trying to do is get your work done so you don't fail out of Wharton. But I digress...

I feel like I'm on the cusp of the state of overwhelmness (is that a word?) - like if I deviate at all from my to do list I will descend into the world of "Oh, Sh!t." I'm not scared yet - but I could be there by the end of the week!


Quote:
It is AMAZING how quickly your calendar fills up here. I'm booked SOLID until this evening. Between 4 and 6 today I scheduled to be in 3 different places. It's crazy.

Given the hectic extracurricular schedule, I'm extremely glad I pushed Corporate Finance to the spring. Wharton has two standard schedules, the Red Schedule and the Blue Schedule. The schedules are identical, except in the Red Schedule, you take 6 classes your first two quarters. The Blue Schedule allows you to defer Corporate Finance until the spring. The administration suggests anyone with a "quantitative concerns" take the Blue Schedule. Although I don't consider myself a quant weakling, I did select the blue schedule. I just think it's better to take 5 classes instead of 6. Maybe it's just me. I think a lot of people let their ego make their schedule decisions - it's like they think they'll be less of a Whartonite if they take the Blue Schedule. All I know is I'm glad I go to bed before midnight every night. I don't know if I could do that if I had an extra class.


It goes on like this ...

Quote:
OMG.

Finals start in one friggin' week. I can't believe how quickly the first quarter flew by.

I'm feeling a little overwhelmed. I sort of rested on my laurels in accounting, and my current grade reflects my effort. The only good thing is that 42% of my grade will be decided in the next week so I can still pull it out.



and more...


Quote:
Despite assurances from second years, I think the second quarter is more hectic than the first. Maybe it's because all of the activities I volunteered for last quarter are picking up, or maybe its because recruiting has gotten more intense. All I know is I barely have time to do anything. My apartment looks like a hurricane went through it. I have piles of laundry to do. My refrigerator is getting bare.

So basically I'm a little overwhelmed. I feel like I'm trying to do everything, and in doing that, everything isn't done completely. It's like I'm juggling a dozen eggs - and I keep dropping them.

What I need is an assistant - someone to clean up my apartment, cook for me, do my laundry, and write my thank you notes. Or a Xerox copy of myself. Ya that would work, too.




Its an interesting read... but jeez, it makes me scared.


(Most of the good stuff starts in 7/1/2004)
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2007, 16:10
And one more:

Quote:
During the learning team retreat, one of our leadership fellows told us about how one learning team held people accountable. If a team member messed up, he or she had to where a t-shirt, a la The Scarlet Letter declaring, "I let my learning team down." I think I deserve one of those t-shirts.

When people talk about drama on their learning teams, they often blame others in the group for the drama. Well this time the problem is my fault. I am a little overextended (I COMPLETELY underestimated the intensity (insanity??) of IB recruiting) and I have to admit that learning team stuff was not always my top priority. What I didn't realize was how that made the team feel. I guess it never feels good when you think you don't matter to someone. I never meant to send that message. But I'm glad I got that feedback. I learned I need to be more conscious of how my actions and attitudes affect others.

Things are still crazy, but I'm less stressed about it. Stressing does absolutely nothing but cause grey hairs! I'm beginning to come to terms with the chance that I may not always be completely prepared for cold calls. And you know what? If I get called on and I don't know the answer, life will go on. I'm also learning that JIT delivery of class assignments is a good thing.

I still feel behind in my recruiting efforts. Some people seem to have themselves so together on all fronts (professional, personal, social, academic). I don't know how they do it. Maybe they have a twin and they switch back and forth? Or maybe they sold their souls to the devil? I just don't know how they do it. I'm telling you, there's money to be made on that human Xerox machine. All you engineers should get on that.
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2007, 16:17
And more thats truly a gem:

Quote:
But I think something good came out of my DIP failure. I've been thinking a lot about my choice to focus on Investment Banking for the summer. When I started recruiting, I was interested in IB and Public Finance. I was leaning towards Public Finance, but then people starting telling reasons why that was a bad idea. And then they told me I HAD to do IB at a top bulge bracket firm in NYC. Or else my experience would be for naught. And although I don't usually get caught up in the herd, I listened. And because of that - I think I screwed up my recruiting efforts. I blame no one but myself.

The unfortunate thing about B-school is recruiting starts early. There's not enough time to explore and try different options. So you have to decide quickly. And it's easier than one would think to get swept up by the herd.

So what now? I'm still looking into some boutique IB firms, but I'm primarily focusing my efforts on public finance, venture philanthropy, and other "social interest" finance options. I don't know where I'll end up - but I know I'll get a job. And I believe it will be a cool job. I'll end up where I'm supposed to be. I just have to have faith!
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2007, 16:22
And the last one I'll post since no is reading this anyway

Quote:
All in all, my first year at Wharton has been phenomenal. I've met people who will be friends for life. I've learned so much, and this time around the knowledge seems to be sticking! I've also learned so much about myself: my weaknesses, my fears, my strengths. I would never change my decision to go back to business school.

But that being said, there are some things I wish I had known this time last year. It might have made my transition back to school a little less rocky.

I wish I had known that recruiting would take up half of my time in the fall semester. Coming in, I had absolutely no clue about the time required to (not) find a job. In the fall I focused on Investment Banking only. I didn't recruit with any other industries (although now I wish I had). IB alone took 20-35 hours a week. When you add class time, study time, extracurricular time, and just plan old take-care-of-business time, I had about 2 to 3 hours left to sleep each night. The intensity of the recruiting schedule hit me like a ton of bricks. And contrary to what the career management office might tell you, if you don't have banking experience and you skip an event at a top tier bank, you can forget getting on their interview list. So I pretty much had to go to everything.

I wish I had known that banking wouldn't work out for me. Hindsight is 20/20 right? So looking back, there were clues that it wouldn't work out. Whenever I would tell a former banker that I wanted to do banking, they would cock their head to the side, shake their head, and say, "You don't seem like the banking type. You're too nice to be a banker." I interpreted that as "You can't hang with the bankers," and "You can't do that job." But that's not what they were saying. They were questioning my fit for the job. If I had been smart, I would have put my ego aside, heard what they were saying, and realized that the people interviewing me would feel the same way. If people don't think you'll fit, you're not getting the job. It's not a judgment about ability. I wish I had realized this sooner. I think I would have saved myself A LOT of grief.

I wish I had known that I would have to work HARD to excel here. I've always risen to the top. I worked for my accomplishments, but there have been few things (at least academically) that I couldn't do reasonably well. So when I got here, I rested on my laurels. After all, I had learned so much of these subjects before. I'd done marketing, accounting, finance, etc. So I expected it would be relatively easy for me to understand. So first quarter, I just went through the motions. I showed up, did the minimum required. And it totally bit me in the ass. I quickly learned that if I wanted to do well here, I was going to have to WORK. I'd have to do practice problems, and do all the readings if I wanted to master this stuff. I'm glad I learned that because, I think I learned MUCH more in quarters 2-4 because of my improved effort. I just wish I had gotten my wake up call sooner.

And there are some things that I were different at Wharton.

I wish the Career Management Office provided more support post-DIP week. After the Dedicated Interviewing Period, I felt like the CMO just dropped us. Sure they had sessions to give you tips on getting a job, but those tips were basically "Look on our website for jobs" and "Use the WAVE alumni database to make contacts in the companies." Well, duh. What would have helped me would have been sessions on different industries so I could figure out what to do next. They had them in September, but in September I was focused on banking. Sure that was my decision, but the nature of the process kind of makes you choose early. For people like me who were focused on something that didn't pan out, it would have been helpful to do these sessions again in March.

I wish some of my fellow students were able to hold their liquor better. These people are the minority, but there are a few who clearly were never really around alcohol - because now they act like they are 21 again. So either they didn't party with alcohol in undergrad (they were studying while the rest of us are partying) or they are alcoholics. The jury's still out. But I wish this small group would learn how to drink and have fun without acting like complete asses.

I wish people here respected nonprofits more. When I mentioned that I worked for a nonprofit, it's like the people I was talking to instantly shut down, and start looking for someone more important to talk to. I quickly learned to leave "nonprofit" and "community" out of my elevator pitch. I've been SHOCKED by some of the stereotypes people have of nonprofits. People assume that nonprofits are all poorly run. That's completely untrue. There are well run nonprofits and poorly run nonprofits - just like in the for-profit world. And I wish MBAs didn't think it was up to them to save the nonprofit world from itself - that's just presumptuous. And because I worked at a nonprofit for part of my career, people assume that I'm an idiot, I know nothing, and all I have are soft skills. But many of the classes I kick ass in are "quant."

I wish that Au Bon Pain in Huntsman Hall could be replaced by a competent vendor. That restaurant has to be the most inefficient "quick" (and I am clearly using THAT term loosely) service I have ever seen. "How to fix ABP" would be an excellent OPIM project - maybe that would get me more excited about OPIM!

And there are things I wish I had done differently.

I wish I went to more parties.

I wish I had dinner more often with friends.

I wish I had met more people.

I wish I had studied more.

I wish I had learned more about careers in product development, strategy, marketing, and consulting.

I wish I had taken more time to find a career that fit me well.

I wish I had gotten to know my professors better.

And I wish I had won just one session of Cohort Bingo.

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 [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2007, 16:27
Oh and if you want to know what happens to her abysmal and totally disaster of a job hunt ...

http://futurembagirl.blogspot.com/2005_ ... chive.html
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2007, 17:55
is she cute? :oops:
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2007, 18:38
thanks for posting the tidbits! i probably would never have gone through and read all that myself but i'm glad to read the highlights.

btw, i went to wharton undergrad and au bon pain (which was in steiny D back then, huntsman hall didn't exist yet) was just as poorly run then. some things never change :roll:

she makes me really scared for what this whole thing is going to be like... :?
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2007, 22:09
bulishona wrote:
she makes me really scared for what this whole thing is going to be like... :?


I would like to think that Kellogg keeps you very busy (and then some), but is not as intense as Wharton.

That's what I like to think. Who knows what the reality is. Guess we should ask at DAK, huh?
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Mar 2007, 22:58
Her story about her intense schedule doesn't really bother me that much. What concerns me more is that a Wharton student had as much trouble as she did finding a job in ibanking and finance. I had the impression that Wharton students could more or less name their job in ibanking. I wonder if her difficulties were because of a challenging job search or because of her own shortcomings. The fact that she had trouble does raise concerns though.

On another note, I have heard from several people that the pre-term at Wharton is really intense.
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Mar 2007, 01:35
i'm still not convinced :-D doing an MBA can't be harder than working on a trading floor 13 hours a day .... surely ??!

i wonder how many people at business school have had a properly gruelling job before... putting themselves through school by cleaning out toilets and scrubbing floors etc.
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Mar 2007, 02:08
I read this blog from beginning to end.

http://domodomo74.blogspot.com/
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Mar 2007, 06:19
dukes wrote:
I read this blog from beginning to end.

http://domodomo74.blogspot.com/


Great blog... I like the interview tips. I read through this portion here:

Quote:
Talking about dings, let me tell you the sinister INSEAD Ding tradition.
Apparently, INSEAD used to have a bell in the campus. The tradition had it that, whenever participants got dinged in job applications, they would ring the bell. In the darkest moments of the 1990s, the bell rang so much that the Dean decided to stop the practice.


Wow, that must have been rough.
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Mar 2007, 08:18
is this just for MBA related blogs?

these are the two blogs i frequent

http://postsecret.blogspot.com/

http://riverbendblog.blogspot.com/ (PS: no political or any other indication here, the blog tends to lean on one side of the issue)

both have won some critic acclaims
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Mar 2007, 08:28
I love postsecret.

Recently he posted a postcard that came from Stanford Business School.
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Mar 2007, 08:40
I read somewhere hte postsecret guy went to GSB. Don't know if it was true.
You guys bought the postsecret book on amazon?
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Mar 2007, 15:32
And if you guys wanna know what happens to the girl above post-mba.. I finally got to that part...

[quote]

It wasn’t until I interviewed with the consulting firm that I remember my passion for nonprofits. For a year and a half I’ve talked about my work in terms of achievements and responsibilities but anyone who’s ever worked in the nonprofit sector knows those things – the numbers of your job – aren’t why your there. You’re there because you believe in the mission. You’re there because you see your work as contributing more to the world than additional profits. So during my interview with the nonprofit consulting firm I actually got to talk about the mission of work I did and my passion for it, and it reignited my commitment for the field. It reminded me what I wanted to be when I grow up.

After first round interviews with the nonprofit consulting firm, I started to feel like my recruiting journey was sort of like the Wizard of Oz. I had to go on this rocky journey and went through many trials. But in the end, I find out “There’s No Place Like Home.â€
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Mar 2007, 15:51
Sounds like came out on top. Bridgespan is freaking hard to get into and very prestigious (they're a Bain spin-off).
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Mar 2007, 16:00
Good one, rhyme et all.
ucs, about the schedule being hard, my pre-MBA tour of 07 taught me:

a) HBS: a few friends went out to dinner with me around 8.30 and were "sighing" about having to read 2 more cases before bed time. And having to get up by around 7am. They'd hit 1 or 2 am regularly (about twice a week). But the only "all nighter" story I heard from them was related to preparing for a VC (or was it PE?) competition. Which they won.

b) Kellogg: (at presentation with adcom staff):

Lepium: so, what surprises students the most at Kellogg?
Adcom: (several other things...then) well, also some people feel that B-school is a good time to calm down a little and relax. What they end up realizing is that B-school actually takes more time than a full time job.

c) Ross: (talking to several students)

- B-school (social activities aside) takes about 40 - 50 hs a week, including classes, studying and work.

- Geez! 1 - 2 am at HBS? You'd never go through that, here.

pelihu:

A friend of mine is currently a 1st year at Wharton. He said he considered IB first but then he added that since his pre-MBA position was mainly in supply chain / logistics, he had been adviced it would be a tough sell for him. He then moved on to job hunting for MC, for which his odds were much better. He also said that if his experience had been more sales - related (even outside finance) he would have had a stronger case for IB or some other positions in finance (sales and trading?).

A current Ross 2nd year student told me that it was actually easier to get a finance job from Ross than from Columbia (for career switchers). He had a friend over at Columbia, so he had some actual info on that. His case was: at Columbia, everyone has finance experience, and all firms will expect that since you are in NYC you will drop by at their office like 20 times. At Ross, few people have finance experience so your competition at interviews is easier. So, for a career switcher, Ross would be arguably better than Columbia in this case.

Cheers. L.
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Mar 2007, 16:14
A good friend of mine had a similar career change experience at Fuqua. He was able to land multiple NY IB jobs with minimal networking and a single trip to NYC.

Quote:
A current Ross 2nd year student told me that it was actually easier to get a finance job from Ross than from Columbia (for career switchers). He had a friend over at Columbia, so he had some actual info on that. His case was: at Columbia, everyone has finance experience, and all firms will expect that since you are in NYC you will drop by at their office like 20 times. At Ross, few people have finance experience so your competition at interviews is easier. So, for a career switcher, Ross would be arguably better than Columbia in this case.

Cheers. L.
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Mar 2007, 23:28
One at GSB - http://wakechick.blogspot.com/ You will find several links to other GSB blogs
  [#permalink] 27 Mar 2007, 23:28
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