Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 23 Oct 2014, 02:20

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

HKUST 2011-2012 - Calling All Applicants

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 25 Jul 2010
Posts: 49
Location: Australia
Schools: IE
WE 1: IT Consultancy
WE 2: Public Gov Sector
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: Calling All HKUST 2011-12 Applicants [#permalink] New post 30 Jan 2011, 03:26
i guess for who hasn't heard anything from R1, considering it a ding. I was dinged as well, probably 2 weeks ago (interviewed 2 months after submission, heard nothing during the period). Interestingly i have collected ppl who have been admitted, most of them are coming or having Finance background. So it kills me since i am from IT and targeting at Consulting.
2 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 04 Nov 2010
Posts: 52
Schools: HKUST, INSEAD
WE 1: 8.7 yrs by Aug 2011
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 5 [2] , given: 1

Re: Calling All HKUST 2011-12 Applicants [#permalink] New post 30 Jan 2011, 15:26
2
This post received
KUDOS
Very interesting to hear your take on HKUST and it's admissions goal. I will admit my resume reads very well, but personally I have carefully crafted my career since undergrad because my grades are less than optimal for a top tier school. I had dinner last night with a few other HKUST accepted students, alumni, and a few interviewing candidates. I can absolutely say that not everyone at the table was a banker or a consultant or of an 'easily place-able' background. A couple of people were not even business. While I believe your thought that HKUST is concerned about placement (and really, what school is not, since that is a major criterion of school selection), I don't think that a 'different' background in and of itself will not exclude you from being interviewed or accepted (just based on who was around the table). But true, you cannot be clueless and waffle on what you want to do. While someone has 2 years to 'discover themselves' at HBS, one only has 1 year at HKUST, so you better have a clear idea of what you want before you go in, or you better figure out fast.

I would also point out that MBA programs in Asia are still not as mature as the US or European programs, and they are going to focus on the immediate need at hand, which is 1) a solid educational platform, and 2) the basic fact that graduating students need jobs. I think you're being a bit harsh comparing HKUST to HBS. One school was founded in 1908 and the other has been around for 10 years (guessing). One school is located in the United States, where all the major corporations have MBA recruitment programs and schedules, and one is in Asia, where companies have no such en-masse recruitment program in place. From last night, I learned that while career services has a resume book for companies to flip through, there's a big emphasis on the student to network and make their own opportunities. So of course in an environment with such a lack of external 'infrastructure', the career services office is going to be very concerned about placement.

So I understand you are angry you didn't get accepted, and you are probably pretty pissed off at the institution and the rhetoric, and that has obviously made you very bitter. Or, perhaps you really enjoy completing applications, requesting recommendations, and paying fees for schools you never intend to attend even if accepted. At any rate, venting your frustrations by attempting to defame the school in a place where people are looking for mutual support and advice is probably not your best forum. Why would you come here to make people who have applied or been accepted feel bad about their decision?



xuexoa wrote:
Hi all,

I was dinged from HKUST w/o an interview but so were a lot of other peeps (and peepettes) with strong backgrounds.

From reading all the traffic on this thread and based on my own conversation with HKUST admissions staff, including the post grad admissions director, Mr. Tsang, and the some regional ambassadors, it seems to me that HKUST is a school that is particularly concerned with ensuring that its students land good jobs after the program and that they, correspondingly, promote the school through their achievements.

In fact, I'm too kind in using the above language...the school is downright way too paranoid about ensuring it selects the right people. Requesting that peeps who have been previously interviewed and who obviously have strong backgrounds and are qualified applicants participate in yet another career-focused interview with a career services person is totally ridiculous. It portrays the HKUST MBA program as being a "nanny" institution that micro-manages its students career choices and rates them on the basis of these future career choices for selection purposes.

The philosophy behind the process, along with the process itself, reeks. It portrays a rather stuffy and controlling atmosphere at the school, or at least within the admissions and career services fields. In contrast, a prominent school like HBS doesn't really give much of a damn about what an applicant's career goals are.

The HBS admissions director, whose comments are influential to the point that she is often quoted solely on a first name basis, told an audience that I was part of last year that its adcom doesn't particularly care for what an applicants career aspirations are because they want leaders...HBS and other schools look for leaders while HKUST seems to be acting as more of an outplacement agency, more concerned with ensuring that it can fill job vacancies than selecting the best overal leaders.

This is sad not only for the school, the quality of its student pool, but also for the people that are being asked to jump through more unannounced hoops by participating in a "career focused" 3rd interview...it's rather hard to fathom! I know, you're probably thinking, "well, HBS attracts and values younger applicants"...true, but the HBS career goals essay is totally optional. Most of the HBS alums who attended the session I was at overtly stated that they "had no idea what they wanted to do after b-school", and the HBS admission director seconded that by adding, "...and we don't expect candidates to have a very clear picture to know what they want to do afterward either."

Yes, HBS' program provides two years of growth and discovery while HKUST's is either 12- or 16-months...but still, going to b-school is largely about personal growth and discovery, and perhaps trying something new after the MBA that had not initially been envisioned at the start of the MBA...acceptance into b-school shouldn't be merely about convincing the career services and admissions folk that you can easily find a good post-MBA job in a sector that these people expect you to work in after graduation. MBAs were supposed to be about selecting and training those most prone to be enterprising and successful, not about determining whether your career plan accord with the expectations of Mr. Tsang and his motley crew.

I recall how Mr. Tsang kept telling me ad nauseam in person that it was "key to for HKUST to understand if and how its MBA program would be of aid to a particular candidate's career." All of the above sounds pretty routine for b-school admissions folks to say except that HKUST seems to be overly concerned about selecting only those candidates that will be easy to place in jobs after graduation. Perhaps this is due to the rather un-enterprising and unimaginative spirit of Mr. Tsang and his staff (padon the ad hominem nature of this comment but these were my views after meeting with the HKUST folk last year) or the fact that the HKUST staff remember the long days of 2008 when the unwanted Bentleys kept piling up in HK garages and the school's graduates couldn't get jobs.

An ambassador had also told me how HKUST had in the past accepted applicants who turned out to not be very good and were a disappointment. I don't know much more about this situation but it seems like the school had some issues with this in the past decade and that's partially why the ambassadors were instituted to help candidates submit better applications. Perhaps this issue impacts the paranoia I sense coming out of HKUST.

I hope the comparative example with HBS given above and my personal views on the matter resonate with some of you. I wouldn't have attended HKUST even if I were accepted. It's a fine school but it's really just a place where INSEAD and LBS rejects congregate, especially thosae with know Chinese language skills. Seriously, would you want to attend such a school? I met some European alums of HKUST who couldn't even speak about basic things like the weather in Chinese despite haveing taken the 2-week Putonghua training course at the beginning of the program. That 2-week intro is such a joke. Ironically, I met 2010 alums of HKUST who were planning "internet startups" that aimed to re-create Facebook and Expedia...hmm...haven't we seen this before? I guess everyone is considered a startup entrepreneur when they can’t find work after completing the HKUST MBA.

The funny thing is that these startups peeps who recently graduated from HKUST had good, solid technical and engineering jobs prior to attending HKUST. Given the fuzzy nature of their post-HKUST "startups", I find it perplexing that HKUST is so concerned about ensuring the post-MBA viability of the current batch of applicants that are being recalled for further interviewing, especially since HKUST has already taken so damn long to reach its decisions. The school works at a snails pace while places like CEIBS are lighting quick and to the point.

I know some may call me a h8r but it's not that simple, as there's some substance to my views on HKUST. I'm now even wondering whether I should exchange in to HKUST or whether ISB would be a better option.

For those not accepted by HKUST but accepted by CEIBS: Did you pay the deposit to CEIBS already to hold your spot prior to the R1 deposit deadline? If accepted by HKUST, would you really forego that deposit to attend HKUST? I don't know why HKUST says it's China-focused since all the true Sinophiles attend CEIBS over HKUST. Furthermore, HKUST is far from competing with the likes of INSEAD, LBS, and IMD in terms of its international scope. As a backup plan, there is always BeiDa’S School of Marxism? Did anyone else apply to its graduate program for foreign students?

I wish good luck to all those being interrogated by career services staff during the upcoming interviews.

Ciao,
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 11 Aug 2010
Posts: 21
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: Calling All HKUST 2011-12 Applicants [#permalink] New post 30 Jan 2011, 22:00
agree with nycgirl! :)
1 KUDOS received
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 18 Dec 2007
Posts: 983
Location: Hong Kong
Concentration: Entrepreneurship, Technology
Schools: Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) - Class of 2010
Followers: 11

Kudos [?]: 133 [1] , given: 10

Re: Calling All HKUST 2011-12 Applicants [#permalink] New post 30 Jan 2011, 22:17
1
This post received
KUDOS
There is a strong need to network. But to be frank, the need is there for any school if you want to find the best opportunity for you. Even at the elite schools in the USA, many jobs are sourced through networking. Furthermore, students who wholly rely on the career services only are less likely to be the proactive go getters that corporations would want to recruit. It's best to look at the careers office as guiding/supporting hand.. no matter what school you are in. They can help point you to the right places to network.

@xuexao There are not a lot of entrepreneurs from HKUST, most students aspire for finance related roles, mostly because Hong Kong is a finance city. I am one of the few who are tech & entrepreneurship and no.. I do not work on facebook or expedia clones. Generally speaking, Hong Kong is not a hub for tech-start-ups and China tech start-ups are inherently geared towards locally-owned companies due to the regulations around ownership and control. (No foreign owned internet company has ever been the top player in China). Furthermore, the investor expectations and assessment criteria is different. It's easier for an Asian based investor to get return from a manufacturing start-up that is already cash-flow positive. It's much lower risk to invest in traditional business models than a tech-startup. The lean start-up movement has helped ignite mass investment in Silicon Valley via angels and super angels, but this is not yet reflected in Asia.

You also talk about finance moving to Shanghai.. this may be the case in the long long term, but for the lifetime of most of our careers, this will not be the case due to regulations. The RMB is still not a freely convertible currency, trading and ownership of companies is still highly restricted. That's why many chinese companies float on the Hang Seng Stock Market, or even the NASDAQ or NYSE. Changes to these regulations will happen slowly, and in a manner that allows the chinese govt to maintain "social harmony". Hong Kong remains the financial gateway and hub for China.

Sure, if you're working in Finance in China, you will need Mandarin, lot's of the research, available data will be in Mandarin only, but if you're working on projects which require a more APAC outlook, the documents are going to be in a mix of languages, and English will still dominate. Sure, there is still the preference for bi-linguals, something which a 1 year Mandarin class will not be able to bridge. Conversational Mandarin in China, is as useful as conversational Japanese in Japan when hiring for domestically focused roles....not worth hiring. The language bar is higher nowadays, and it really requires bi-linguals.

Lastly, CEIBS and HKUST have completely different focuses. No 2 schools are like for like, not only do you have to balance style of education, make up of class, faculty, alumni network, key industry focuses/strengths, but you also have to examine life balance and cultural balance. What suits the individual more? How does your personal goals fit in with what the school is offering? What can you offer that is complementary to the schools focus? You may have a candidate with high GMAT, high work exp. etc. who doesn't fit in with the schools culture.. still worth rejecting because they could cause more trouble than benefit for the rest of that years cohort. This is why "fit" is important.

Career Plans - Actually, this is quite common in most schools, Careers Offices cannot help you if you do not know what your career goal is. HBS is about "building leaders" but they also have more time to decide on a career path. A shorter course (whether that be a European one or an Asian one), requires you to have a better idea about what you are looking for. This is the main way that a careers office can help you.
_________________

Get the best GMAT Prep Resources with GMAT Club Premium Membership

CEO
CEO
User avatar
Joined: 17 May 2007
Posts: 2995
Followers: 57

Kudos [?]: 443 [0], given: 210

Re: Calling All HKUST 2011-12 Applicants [#permalink] New post 30 Jan 2011, 22:56
Slandering the school wont really help you get your point across. Reality is that all schools try to do the same - admit the people they think will have the best possible jobs post graduation so that their school can move up in rankings and prestige. Schools like HBS may not say it overtly but they have a pretty thorough screening process. All schools EXCEPT HBS have the career aims essay. MIT even has a cover letter. They all have alumni interviews. HKUST perhaps takes this one step further, maybe they are trying to assess how the applicants will perform in a real life job interview. It is their process - not much you can do about it after the ding.

Plenty of other great schools out there, I'm sure you'll make it to another one.

Good luck.

ps. HKUST ranked #6 in the 2011 FT rankings


xuexoa wrote:
Hi all,

I was dinged from HKUST w/o an interview but so were a lot of other peeps (and peepettes) with strong backgrounds.

From reading all the traffic on this thread and based on my own conversation with HKUST admissions staff, including the post grad admissions director, Mr. Tsang, and the some regional ambassadors, it seems to me that HKUST is a school that is particularly concerned with ensuring that its students land good jobs after the program and that they, correspondingly, promote the school through their achievements.

In fact, I'm too kind in using the above language...the school is downright way too paranoid about ensuring it selects the right people. Requesting that peeps who have been previously interviewed and who obviously have strong backgrounds and are qualified applicants participate in yet another career-focused interview with a career services person is totally ridiculous. It portrays the HKUST MBA program as being a "nanny" institution that micro-manages its students career choices and rates them on the basis of these future career choices for selection purposes.

The philosophy behind the process, along with the process itself, reeks. It portrays a rather stuffy and controlling atmosphere at the school, or at least within the admissions and career services fields. In contrast, a prominent school like HBS doesn't really give much of a damn about what an applicant's career goals are.

The HBS admissions director, whose comments are influential to the point that she is often quoted solely on a first name basis, told an audience that I was part of last year that its adcom doesn't particularly care for what an applicants career aspirations are because they want leaders...HBS and other schools look for leaders while HKUST seems to be acting as more of an outplacement agency, more concerned with ensuring that it can fill job vacancies than selecting the best overal leaders.

This is sad not only for the school, the quality of its student pool, but also for the people that are being asked to jump through more unannounced hoops by participating in a "career focused" 3rd interview...it's rather hard to fathom! I know, you're probably thinking, "well, HBS attracts and values younger applicants"...true, but the HBS career goals essay is totally optional. Most of the HBS alums who attended the session I was at overtly stated that they "had no idea what they wanted to do after b-school", and the HBS admission director seconded that by adding, "...and we don't expect candidates to have a very clear picture to know what they want to do afterward either."

Yes, HBS' program provides two years of growth and discovery while HKUST's is either 12- or 16-months...but still, going to b-school is largely about personal growth and discovery, and perhaps trying something new after the MBA that had not initially been envisioned at the start of the MBA...acceptance into b-school shouldn't be merely about convincing the career services and admissions folk that you can easily find a good post-MBA job in a sector that these people expect you to work in after graduation. MBAs were supposed to be about selecting and training those most prone to be enterprising and successful, not about determining whether your career plan accord with the expectations of Mr. Tsang and his motley crew.

I recall how Mr. Tsang kept telling me ad nauseam in person that it was "key to for HKUST to understand if and how its MBA program would be of aid to a particular candidate's career." All of the above sounds pretty routine for b-school admissions folks to say except that HKUST seems to be overly concerned about selecting only those candidates that will be easy to place in jobs after graduation. Perhaps this is due to the rather un-enterprising and unimaginative spirit of Mr. Tsang and his staff (padon the ad hominem nature of this comment but these were my views after meeting with the HKUST folk last year) or the fact that the HKUST staff remember the long days of 2008 when the unwanted Bentleys kept piling up in HK garages and the school's graduates couldn't get jobs.

An ambassador had also told me how HKUST had in the past accepted applicants who turned out to not be very good and were a disappointment. I don't know much more about this situation but it seems like the school had some issues with this in the past decade and that's partially why the ambassadors were instituted to help candidates submit better applications. Perhaps this issue impacts the paranoia I sense coming out of HKUST.

I hope the comparative example with HBS given above and my personal views on the matter resonate with some of you. I wouldn't have attended HKUST even if I were accepted. It's a fine school but it's really just a place where INSEAD and LBS rejects congregate, especially thosae with know Chinese language skills. Seriously, would you want to attend such a school? I met some European alums of HKUST who couldn't even speak about basic things like the weather in Chinese despite haveing taken the 2-week Putonghua training course at the beginning of the program. That 2-week intro is such a joke. Ironically, I met 2010 alums of HKUST who were planning "internet startups" that aimed to re-create Facebook and Expedia...hmm...haven't we seen this before? I guess everyone is considered a startup entrepreneur when they can’t find work after completing the HKUST MBA.

The funny thing is that these startups peeps who recently graduated from HKUST had good, solid technical and engineering jobs prior to attending HKUST. Given the fuzzy nature of their post-HKUST "startups", I find it perplexing that HKUST is so concerned about ensuring the post-MBA viability of the current batch of applicants that are being recalled for further interviewing, especially since HKUST has already taken so damn long to reach its decisions. The school works at a snails pace while places like CEIBS are lighting quick and to the point.

I know some may call me a h8r but it's not that simple, as there's some substance to my views on HKUST. I'm now even wondering whether I should exchange in to HKUST or whether ISB would be a better option.

For those not accepted by HKUST but accepted by CEIBS: Did you pay the deposit to CEIBS already to hold your spot prior to the R1 deposit deadline? If accepted by HKUST, would you really forego that deposit to attend HKUST? I don't know why HKUST says it's China-focused since all the true Sinophiles attend CEIBS over HKUST. Furthermore, HKUST is far from competing with the likes of INSEAD, LBS, and IMD in terms of its international scope. As a backup plan, there is always BeiDa’S School of Marxism? Did anyone else apply to its graduate program for foreign students?

I wish good luck to all those being interrogated by career services staff during the upcoming interviews.

Ciao,

_________________

Get the best GMAT Prep Resources with GMAT Club Premium Membership

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 20 Jan 2011
Posts: 17
Schools: HKUST (Admit)
WE 1: 4.5
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 3

Re: Calling All HKUST 2011-12 Applicants [#permalink] New post 31 Jan 2011, 21:31
i've been silently following this discussion and it is definitely interesting to watch this virtual debate - i applied for R2 this year.

now onto a different question (sorry for interrupting the serious discussion here) - for those of you who interviewed with HKUST through Skype, did you ever find ways of emailing and thanking your interviewer? i had my interview today (2 sessions, similar to what was described above); i know it is common etiquette to write a simple thank you note but both Skype accounts were registered to the school...

So if anyone has a good suggestion, please let me know... thanks in advance :)
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 25 Jul 2010
Posts: 49
Location: Australia
Schools: IE
WE 1: IT Consultancy
WE 2: Public Gov Sector
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: Calling All HKUST 2011-12 Applicants [#permalink] New post 01 Feb 2011, 00:01
I wasn't sure about my suitability for this school, so i didn't. I did send email to IE tho, i was admitted. I will reckon send it. It wont hurt ur application anyway.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 04 Nov 2010
Posts: 52
Schools: HKUST, INSEAD
WE 1: 8.7 yrs by Aug 2011
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 1

Re: Calling All HKUST 2011-12 Applicants [#permalink] New post 01 Feb 2011, 08:20
Hi Hancy,

I didn't send thank-you follow up notes, just because I had no idea where to send them. I just thanked my interviewers at the end of our Skype session and the main coordinator. I don't think they hold it against you if you don't email them a note-- obviously you aren't going to ask for their emails over a video chat!
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 11 Aug 2010
Posts: 21
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: Calling All HKUST 2011-12 Applicants [#permalink] New post 01 Feb 2011, 08:24
Did anyone else get the "expect a call from the MBA specialist" email?
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 20 Jan 2011
Posts: 17
Schools: HKUST (Admit)
WE 1: 4.5
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 3

Re: Calling All HKUST 2011-12 Applicants [#permalink] New post 01 Feb 2011, 19:37
Jiang and nycgirl191 - thanks so much for your advice :) now eagerly waiting for result... (since it is Chinese New Year this week, i'll just assume not much will be done and try to focus on other apps..)
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 07 Jan 2011
Posts: 6
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: Calling All HKUST 2011-12 Applicants [#permalink] New post 02 Feb 2011, 05:51
Hello all,

I am one of the candidates who had a “career consultation” Monday with head of career services. I felt our conversation went well and it was going to be a 50/50 chance I would get an offer. They emailed me yesterday and told me they need more time again and I was on their waiting list. They will review my app again in June.

I am disappointed in their indecision because I felt I had shown them my potential and capabilities through our many emails/conversations and my past experiences. I feel as though they might have been concerned with finding a job for me post grad rather than trying to develop business leaders for students that graduate from their program. I sent an email back to them but they won’t get a chance to see it until after the lunar new year holiday. This delay puts me in a difficult position for my arrangements.

In the meantime, I want to wait for them, but June is quite far away. I had my intial R1 interview a week after the app deadline (early dec) and its been a long wait for their decision. I’m wondering if anyone is in the same boat? I have replies to other schools I have to give and realistically, what are the chances I get accepted in June if they review my app again? I think they said June because that is when the R3 decisions will end.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 02 Feb 2011
Posts: 1
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: Calling All HKUST 2011-12 Applicants [#permalink] New post 02 Feb 2011, 08:09
chiukel wrote:
Hello all,

I am one of the candidates who had a “career consultation” Monday with head of career services. I felt our conversation went well and it was going to be a 50/50 chance I would get an offer. They emailed me yesterday and told me they need more time again and I was on their waiting list. They will review my app again in June.

...



Hmm, I had an interview recently as well (Wednesday before yours) but I haven't gotten a reply yet. I'm actually hoping for a later reply since I'm going for the part-time program and need some extra time to get my stuff together (mostly get my HK ID card so I can work there while I study with my current company).

As for xuexoa, sorry but CEIBS is a "thanks for offer but I'll have to pass". Why would I go to an MBA program where the average wage is less than my studied BA? In the end it doesn't matter what the reputation of a school is. For 99% of us prestige/methods mean nothing. It's getting that well-paying job / promotion or career change. CEIBS could be the highest academically ranked MBA program there is but unless it leads to executive jobs that actually pay more than what I currently have (and not the $50K US "Chinese exec job") it's useless to me. For a business degree, typical things like ROI should be at top of mind for students.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 02 Feb 2011
Posts: 2
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: Calling All HKUST 2011-12 Applicants [#permalink] New post 02 Feb 2011, 22:04
Hello, fellow applicants. I've been following the forum without giving much input but felt compelled to share, given my situation. I applied for R2 (submitted application on 12/14) and quickly received an interview invitation (12/20). I had two interview sessions: 1 to evaluate potential, 1 to evaluate career potential. The first interview was much more casual and conversational in nature; I was asked to elaborate on teamwork philosophies and share examples of past leadership. The second interview was a bit more formal; I was asked more traditional questions such as my reasons for pursuing an MBA and why HKUST would help me reach my goal. The second interview included many of your "standard" mba interview questions, and I generally was not asked any curveball questions.

Long story short, I was lucky to have received an acceptance roughly two weeks after the interviews. For those of you who would like to know, my profile:
GMAT 740
GPA sub-3.0
5 years financial services experience in the US

As an American-born Chinese, this would represent a major move and change for me. If I do indeed go to HKUST, I am prepared to work in HK post-MBA for 3-5 years and then move back to the US to pursue a career in helping an American company move into the Chinese marketplace. However, as I understand it, while HKUST has a strong reputation in China, it is virtually unknown in the US. As such, it is crucial to have a strong experience in that immediate job after MBA graduation. Because there is relatively little information about career prospects at HKUST, I have some concerns.

Are MBA's in demand in HK/CH? If so, are they typically valued only in the finance industry? What are the career prospects for consulting and marketing focused students?

I have just a few weeks to make a commitment/deposit, and while I'm extremely excited about this opportunity, as you can imagine, I have some doubts. Any guidance and feedback is greatly appreciated!

Thanks, and good luck to all.

PS, I'm happy to share more of my thoughts on the admissions process for those who are interested.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 25 Jul 2010
Posts: 49
Location: Australia
Schools: IE
WE 1: IT Consultancy
WE 2: Public Gov Sector
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: Calling All HKUST 2011-12 Applicants [#permalink] New post 02 Feb 2011, 23:32
theericlee wrote:
Hello, fellow applicants. I've been following the forum without giving much input but felt compelled to share, given my situation. I applied for R2 (submitted application on 12/14) and quickly received an interview invitation (12/20). I had two interview sessions: 1 to evaluate potential, 1 to evaluate career potential. The first interview was much more casual and conversational in nature; I was asked to elaborate on teamwork philosophies and share examples of past leadership. The second interview was a bit more formal; I was asked more traditional questions such as my reasons for pursuing an MBA and why HKUST would help me reach my goal. The second interview included many of your "standard" mba interview questions, and I generally was not asked any curveball questions.

Long story short, I was lucky to have received an acceptance roughly two weeks after the interviews. For those of you who would like to know, my profile:
GMAT 740
GPA sub-3.0
5 years financial services experience in the US

As an American-born Chinese, this would represent a major move and change for me. If I do indeed go to HKUST, I am prepared to work in HK post-MBA for 3-5 years and then move back to the US to pursue a career in helping an American company move into the Chinese marketplace. However, as I understand it, while HKUST has a strong reputation in China, it is virtually unknown in the US. As such, it is crucial to have a strong experience in that immediate job after MBA graduation. Because there is relatively little information about career prospects at HKUST, I have some concerns.

Are MBA's in demand in HK/CH? If so, are they typically valued only in the finance industry? What are the career prospects for consulting and marketing focused students?

I have just a few weeks to make a commitment/deposit, and while I'm extremely excited about this opportunity, as you can imagine, I have some doubts. Any guidance and feedback is greatly appreciated!

Thanks, and good luck to all.

PS, I'm happy to share more of my thoughts on the admissions process for those who are interested.


what other options do you have?
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 02 Feb 2011
Posts: 2
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: Calling All HKUST 2011-12 Applicants [#permalink] New post 03 Feb 2011, 08:04
Nothing yet! I applied R2 for other schools (USC, Texas, UCLA, Georgetown) and the decisions have not been made yet. I have to make a decision/deposit for HKUST before I know what other options (if any) I have, which makes this a difficult situation.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 19 Sep 2010
Posts: 3
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: Calling All HKUST 2011-12 Applicants [#permalink] New post 04 Feb 2011, 11:50
First of all - Congratulations to those admitted to 2011 HKUST MBA. Question for American applicants - if any of you are planning to withdraw partially or entirely from your IRA account for education fund? According to the IRS, there will not be early withdrawal penalty as long as the school is an "IRS-approved institution". No doubt most American MBA are in this approved category. What about HKUST?
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 20 Jan 2011
Posts: 17
Schools: HKUST (Admit)
WE 1: 4.5
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 3

Re: Calling All HKUST 2011-12 Applicants [#permalink] New post 04 Feb 2011, 17:07
My 2-cents on the ROI and choosing between schools:

I am actually a non-traditional candidate who is not thinking about switching my career, and I'm doing this for my own fun/learning. So wherever I end up going, I'll probably be that person who adversely affects the annual salary and therefore school ranking in the future. Obviously the average salaries will not account for that.

Nonetheless, looking at the ranking and salary trends (with or without someone like me messing up the curve), there has been significant advances in all the schools in Asia. 3 years ago who would've thought HKUST would be ranked #6 this year. So my wishful thinking is that 5-10 years from now the gap between "western (U.S./Europe)" and "eastern (China/HK)" schools will further narrow, and schools like HKUST will be as known and respected globally as they are highly regarded right now in all countries in Asia.

And for me the biggest investment is really time (you can somehow make the money back eventually). So the choice between CEIBS and HKUST for some may also be to test out whether you like living/working in Hong Kong or Shanghai (although ironically both schools are located away from city center), and that is something a U.S. school, even ones with short-term exchange programs, cannot offer.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 06 Feb 2011
Posts: 3
Location: HK
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: Calling All HKUST 2011-12 Applicants [#permalink] New post 06 Feb 2011, 02:08
Hello all, I'm a R2 applicant for HKUST part-time programme. Congrats to those who've been admitted. And good luck to those who are waiting anxiously. The office will work again tomorrow.

Any other part-time programme applicants here?
1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 29 Apr 2010
Posts: 60
Location: Japan
Schools: HKUST, MBS, USC, Hawaii, UCSD
WE 1: Education
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 8 [1] , given: 2

Re: Calling All HKUST 2011-12 Applicants [#permalink] New post 07 Feb 2011, 04:45
1
This post received
KUDOS
I got the official ding from HKUST today.

Congrats to everyone who got in.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 07 Feb 2011
Posts: 1
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: Calling All HKUST 2011-12 Applicants [#permalink] New post 07 Feb 2011, 04:56
Hi, for some reason I decided to search online and see what the potential applicant pool is next year. I am in the class that entered in 2010 full-time MBA. Some of the chatter on this forum is interesting and thought i'd add my 2 cents.

Regarding the general overall admissions thoughts and based on what i've read here, admissions is focused on having an extremely diverse school. Whether that be nationality, where you've lived/worked, the type of work you've done, etc. Therefore, if you are from Namibia or Uzbekistan, you're probably a shoe-in if you've had decent accomplishments so far. Additionally, you need to show a committment to Asia/China.

With regards to the focus on those students the school can place into jobs, I don't think that's much different than other schools, they're probably just more upfront about it here. HKUST is a finance school and will be for sometime. The consulting and remaining fields are mediocre at best, and HK is a finance city. So naturally the school is focused on those who they can help the most, generally in the finance field. Consultants usually don't get hired in Asia, due to the mentality of the local people growing up to follow others. Also Asian firms are more reluctant to hire consultants than in Western countries.

Lastly, the school is keen on promoting the name which is relatively little known outside of the chinese countries. So they are looking for people who will help be good promoters when they leave. Ranking is also important because of the lack of a brand name. Harvard, if it's ranked 10th will still be #1 for most people because the name is that good.

HKUST was just ranked 6th on the FT, and 9th last year, so I am hearing the applicant pool is very strong and much better than in recent years. Therefore, the application process is more waiting around, and strenuous than in years past because the school can be more selective. Good luck to all the applicants.
Re: Calling All HKUST 2011-12 Applicants   [#permalink] 07 Feb 2011, 04:56
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
8 Experts publish their posts in the topic HKUST 2014 Calling all applicants! souvik101990 83 25 Apr 2013, 08:41
6 Experts publish their posts in the topic HKUST 2011-2012 - Calling All Applicants shaselai 295 14 Sep 2010, 09:35
16 Experts publish their posts in the topic HKUST 2013- Calling All Applicants souvik101990 129 23 Oct 2012, 00:25
16 Experts publish their posts in the topic HKUST 2012 - Calling All Applicants vgr 231 15 Aug 2011, 22:49
Display posts from previous: Sort by

HKUST 2011-2012 - Calling All Applicants

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Go to page   Previous    1  ...  4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15    Next  [ 296 posts ] 



GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.