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Charlotte Parkins

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 [#permalink] New post 20 Apr 2005, 02:33
christoph wrote:
saurya_s wrote:
I am just not able to het this one? Why B and C are wrong?


B) is wrong because "clustered suburban houses" cannot include something...

C) is wrong for the same reason as above

Christoph, does clustered suburban houses mean suburban houses that are clustered? I am not still able to get the point, can u plz elaborate on this.
s
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 [#permalink] New post 04 May 2005, 15:59
ob gave a good explanation here. Only D has the right form. X calls for Y and Z, each one being nouns. For instance, you will not "call for X to..." but you will "call for X" period.

Charlotte Parkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called for urban apartment houses that included child-care facilities and for clustered suburban houses with communal eating and social facilities

In bold are the two nouns required for the idiom to stand. The rest in red are just modifiers to the respective nouns. The first is a restrictive clause and the second is a prepositional phrase. A is also good by enumerating two nouns but has present participle which is not preferred because it is a continuous tense implying an ongoing action.
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 [#permalink] New post 05 May 2005, 10:25
I feel that A is wrong for a this reason: "Someone called for X including Y" implies that Y is a part or subset of X, which is not the case here and hence incorrect.

What do you guys say??
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krish

  [#permalink] 05 May 2005, 10:25
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