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Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems,

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Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, [#permalink] New post 17 Apr 2007, 09:24
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  5% (low)

Question Stats:

87% (01:43) correct 12% (00:43) wrong based on 88 sessions
Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, consists of tens of thousands of ideographic characters, each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its own square frame.

(A) each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its
(B) all the characters a miniature calligraphic composition inside their
(C) all the characters a miniature calligraphic composition inside its
(D) every character a miniature calligraphic composition inside their
(E) each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside their

OA:
[Reveal] Spoiler:
A
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 [#permalink] New post 17 Apr 2007, 13:07
I dont' see anything wrong with A

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 [#permalink] New post 17 Apr 2007, 13:13
Answer: A

Each fits perfectly compared to every and all. POE: B,C, and D are OUT

subject-verb agreement: each is singular --> use its instead of their.
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 [#permalink] New post 17 Apr 2007, 20:32
A and B both has the S-V agreement

but A wins as B changes the meaning
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Re: SC - Chinese [#permalink] New post 17 Apr 2007, 22:01
nick_sun wrote:
Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, consists of tens of thousands of ideographic characters, each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its own square frame.

(A) each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its
(B) all the characters a miniature calligraphic composition inside their
(C) all the characters a miniature calligraphic composition inside its
(D) every character a miniature calligraphic composition inside their
(E) each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside their


D, E - every character - thier doesn't match
C - same problem
B - changes the meaning
A - perfectly fine.
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 [#permalink] New post 18 Apr 2007, 00:09
OA is A
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 [#permalink] New post 18 Apr 2007, 00:38
What is the difference bw each and every??

Which one is correct??
each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its
every character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its. (not an option here)

Last edited by sidbidus on 18 Apr 2007, 03:28, edited 1 time in total.
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 [#permalink] New post 18 Apr 2007, 01:43
The correct answer is A

Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, consists of tens of thousands of ideographic characters, each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its own square frame

"its" is correct cauz the subject is "each" - Singular. Thus eliminate B,D,E.

So now choose betwwen A and C

C - each "all the characters" is wierd.

Thus the crrect answer is A.
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 [#permalink] New post 18 Apr 2007, 03:02
This question is from the OG. The official answer is A
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 [#permalink] New post 20 Apr 2007, 22:25
Answer A,

It is clearly agreeing in the subject and verb.

each......its....
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Jul 2007, 20:05
Each refers to "2 times "

Every refers to "more then 2 times" .


The dog has bitten my younger son twice, and each time, he has had to be sent to his kennel.
each time, he has had to be sent to his
every time, it has had to be sent to his
each time, it has had to be sent to its
every time, it has had to be sent to its
each time, he has had to be sent to its

‘Each time’ because it has bitten only twice. The use of the pronoun "he" is unclear here - does it refer to the dog or to the son? In fact, tracing our way back along the sentence, we find that we come across the word "son" before we come across the word "dog", which rather implies that it is the son who owns, and is sent to, the kennel.
The way to get round this ambiguity is to use "it" followed by "its" (no apostrophe!). This limits the choices to (C) and (D). The only difference between these options is the fact that one uses the word "every" and the other uses the word "each". Since these refer to the two times that the dog bit the son, we shouldn't use "every" (that refers to three or more times). The correct option is therefore (C).


bmwhype2 wrote:
sidbidus wrote:
What is the difference bw each and every??

Which one is correct??
each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its
every character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its. (not an option here)


I also would like to know
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Jul 2007, 20:07
empty_spaces wrote:
Each refers to "2 times "

Every refers to "more then 2 times" .


The dog has bitten my younger son twice, and each time, he has had to be sent to his kennel.
each time, he has had to be sent to his
every time, it has had to be sent to his
each time, it has had to be sent to its
every time, it has had to be sent to its
each time, he has had to be sent to its

‘Each time’ because it has bitten only twice. The use of the pronoun "he" is unclear here - does it refer to the dog or to the son? In fact, tracing our way back along the sentence, we find that we come across the word "son" before we come across the word "dog", which rather implies that it is the son who owns, and is sent to, the kennel.
The way to get round this ambiguity is to use "it" followed by "its" (no apostrophe!). This limits the choices to (C) and (D). The only difference between these options is the fact that one uses the word "every" and the other uses the word "each". Since these refer to the two times that the dog bit the son, we shouldn't use "every" (that refers to three or more times). The correct option is therefore (C).


bmwhype2 wrote:
sidbidus wrote:
What is the difference bw each and every??

Which one is correct??
each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its
every character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its. (not an option here)


I also would like to know
yes ive read this somewhere. it does not fit in the context of this sentence.

we cannot have Each/two characters...
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Jul 2007, 20:20
bmwhype2 wrote:
empty_spaces wrote:
Each refers to "2 times "

Every refers to "more then 2 times" .


The dog has bitten my younger son twice, and each time, he has had to be sent to his kennel.
each time, he has had to be sent to his
every time, it has had to be sent to his
each time, it has had to be sent to its
every time, it has had to be sent to its
each time, he has had to be sent to its

‘Each time’ because it has bitten only twice. The use of the pronoun "he" is unclear here - does it refer to the dog or to the son? In fact, tracing our way back along the sentence, we find that we come across the word "son" before we come across the word "dog", which rather implies that it is the son who owns, and is sent to, the kennel.
The way to get round this ambiguity is to use "it" followed by "its" (no apostrophe!). This limits the choices to (C) and (D). The only difference between these options is the fact that one uses the word "every" and the other uses the word "each". Since these refer to the two times that the dog bit the son, we shouldn't use "every" (that refers to three or more times). The correct option is therefore (C).


bmwhype2 wrote:
sidbidus wrote:
What is the difference bw each and every??

Which one is correct??
each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its
every character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its. (not an option here)


I also would like to know
yes ive read this somewhere. it does not fit in the context of this sentence.

we cannot have Each/two characters...


For three and above, I dont think there is any difference between each and every when used as an adjective.

Also, each can be used as a pronoun and an adverb.... every cannot be. Thats the major difference.

Without "character" each can stand on its own... every cant. Given ur two choices, I think both are correct and thats precisely why they didnt give both of them as choices

Thats the only difference I can think of.
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Jul 2007, 11:15
AimHigher wrote:
A and B both has the S-V agreement

but A wins as B changes the meaning


Correction. B is wrong.
correct is -----all characters a miniature calligraphic composition inside their own----
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Re: SC - Chinese [#permalink] New post 29 Jul 2007, 21:30
nick_sun wrote:
Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, consists of tens of thousands of ideographic characters, each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its own square frame.

(A) each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its
(B) all the characters a miniature calligraphic composition inside their
(C) all the characters a miniature calligraphic composition inside its
(D) every character a miniature calligraphic composition inside their
(E) each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside their



A.

You can eliminate any of the choices w/ their b/c their should refer to people.

All doesnt make sense in C.

I've seent this one numerous times
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Re: SC - Chinese [#permalink] New post 24 Feb 2008, 08:46
i think every is singular... correct me if i'm wrong.
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Re: SC - Chinese [#permalink] New post 13 Mar 2008, 20:41
Please advice of the EACH and EVERY for this question.

Sahil's note
The dog has bitten my younger son twice, and each time, he has had to be sent
to his kennel.
(A) each time, he has had to be sent to his
(B) every time, it has had to be sent to his
(C)each time, it has had to be sent to its
(D)every time, it has had to be sent to its
(E)each time, he has had to be sent to its


‘Each time’ because it has bitten only twice. The use of the pronoun "he" is unclear here -
does it refer to the dog or to the son? In fact, tracing our way back along the sentence,
we find that we come across the word "son" before we come across the word "dog",
which rather implies that it is the son who owns, and is sent to, the kennel.
The way to get round this ambiguity is to use "it" followed by "its" (no apostrophe!). This
limits the choices to (C) and (D). The only difference between these options is the fact
that one uses the word "every" and the other uses the word "each". Since these refer to
the two times that the dog bit the son, we shouldn't use "every" (that refers to three or
more times). The correct option is therefore (C).



Using Each was to have only 2 chinese characters in the language...
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Re: SC - Chinese [#permalink] New post 17 Mar 2008, 10:37
I have a question....

I choose A based on it "sounding correct", however, I struggled with the concept of modifying phrases.

Can someone explain why this phrase:

Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, consists of tens of thousands of ideographic characters, each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its own square frame.

can refer to a single character as opposed to "ALL" characters?
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Re: SC - Chinese [#permalink] New post 01 May 2011, 22:01
nick_sun wrote:
Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, consists of tens of thousands of ideographic characters, each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its own square frame.

(A) each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its
(B) all the characters a miniature calligraphic composition inside their
(C) all the characters a miniature calligraphic composition inside its
(D) every character a miniature calligraphic composition inside their
(E) each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside their



i feel A is correct because

2. error- all --- their ?(square /one square)
3. all -its
4. every - thier "(wrong)
5. each - their
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Re: SC - Chinese [#permalink] New post 01 May 2011, 23:44
nick_sun wrote:
Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, consists of tens of thousands of ideographic characters, each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its own square frame.

(A) each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its
(B) all the characters a miniature calligraphic composition inside their
(C) all the characters a miniature calligraphic composition inside its
(D) every character a miniature calligraphic composition inside their
(E) each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside their


The choices C, D and E are wrong for their own disagreements. Between choice A and B, B is definitely weird. So answer is A.

Now for difference between each and every:

1) They both can be used together and individually in a sentence. As per my understanding when we use every we are mostly referring to every one in a group, whereas each refers to every one separately.
2) Each is used more on human side whereas every is used more on things side.

Each human is better than every human :). Every time is better than each time.

They are very much similar in meaning but make a noticeable difference when they are used together.
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Re: SC - Chinese   [#permalink] 01 May 2011, 23:44
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