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Choi: All other factors being equal, children whose parents

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Choi: All other factors being equal, children whose parents [#permalink] New post 29 Apr 2005, 00:15
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A
B
C
D
E

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0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 2 sessions
Choi: All other factors being equal, children whose parents earned doctorates are more llikely to earn a doctorate than children whose parents did not earn doctorates
Hart: But consider this: Over 70 percent of all doctorate holders do not have a parent that also holds a doctorate.
Which of the following is the most accurate evaluation of Hart's reply?
A) It establishes that Choi's clain is an exaggeration
B) If true, it effectively demonstrates that Choi's claim cannot be accurate
C) It is consistent with Choi's claim
D) It provides alternative reasons for accepting Choi's claim
E) It mistakes what is necessary for an event with what is sufficient to determine that the event will occur
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Apr 2005, 01:12
What a question! A and B effectively cancel each other out. C and D are illogical. E correctly notes the misunderstanding.

E.

Vithal, we would really appreciate if you could continue posting questions from this source!!!!!!!!!
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Re: CR: Kap 800: Choi [#permalink] New post 29 Apr 2005, 04:08
I think none of the options accurately evaluate Hart's reply.

A is wrong because Choi's claim may or may not be an exaggeration.

B is wrong because even with > 70% ppl without parents being doctorates, Choi's claim cud be right if there're very few people who're already doctorates. Thus even tho their children are more likely to be doctorates, comparatively more children of non-doctorate people go in for doctorate.

C may be correct. Not necessarily. Besides Hart doesn't make it appear if he thinks Choi's statement is consistent.

D. is wront. "But" means Choi's claim was not accepted.

E is evasive. I can't think of two conditions presented here that provide "necessary" and "sufficient" conditions. Hart's statement thinks having doctorate parents is a "necessary" condition for someone going in for a doctorate. However, the "sufficient" condition isn't properly mentioned in Choi's statement. (I feel that everything being equal people whose folks are doctorates wud go in for doctorate is NOT sufficiient because Choi's statement says "are more likely". It is not "sufficient" for going in for a doctorate).

E might be the best amongst the options - it however doesn't look correct to me still.
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Apr 2005, 04:23
If you read this problem very carefully, it becomes evident that a scope shift is in Hart`s response. His facts are consistent with Choi`s claim. I know I can`t do this on the real GMAT CAT, but I am going to change my answer to "C"
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Apr 2005, 04:59
I will go with B - since 70 percent of all doctorate holders do not have a parent who holds a doctorate shows Choi's claim is false
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Apr 2005, 05:24
C)...

choi`s argument gives a condition that makes it more likely for an effect to happen. if children with parents with doctorate then it more likely that children earn a doctorate

hart doesnt question the chain of choi`s reasoning. he speaks of children with a parent that holds no doctorate and that their % is greater. that is consistent with choii, because it can still be more likely what choi says. there is no conflict between choi and hart.
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Apr 2005, 05:33
GMATT73 wrote:
If you read this problem very carefully, it becomes evident that a scope shift is in Hart`s response. His facts are consistent with Choi`s claim. I know I can`t do this on the real GMAT CAT, but I am going to change my answer to "C"


Choi: All other factors being equal, children whose parents earned doctorates are more llikely to earn a doctorate than children whose parents did not earn doctorates

Hart: But consider this: Over 70 percent of all doctorate holders do not have a parent that also holds a doctorate.

Hart's refution is invalid because he must prove children whose parents earned doctorates are no more llikely to earn a doctorate than children whose parents did not earn doctorates.
Hart's argument seems to stress parents' degree is a sufficient condition which guarantees e their children's doctor degree. Choi just said 'more likely' which might be a necessary condistion.

choice C seems too strong and can be rejected because Hart said 'but', which implied he didn't agree with Choi's assertion.

go with E

OA, please
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Apr 2005, 05:47
chunjuwu wrote:
Choi: All other factors being equal, children whose parents earned doctorates are more llikely to earn a doctorate than children whose parents did not earn doctorates

Hart: But consider this: Over 70 percent of all doctorate holders do not have a parent that also holds a doctorate.

Hart's refution is invalid because he must prove children whose parents earned doctorates are no more llikely to earn a doctorate than children whose parents did not earn doctorates.
Hart's argument seems to stress parents' degree is a sufficient condition which guarantees e their children's doctor degree. Choi just said 'more likely' which might be a necessary condistion.

choice C seems too strong and can be rejected because Hart said 'but', which implied he didn't agree with Choi's assertion.

go with E

OA, please


choi`s argument is a prediction that makes an effect more likely, but it`s not a fact. the effect can happen but it must not happen.

hart`s argument is a fact. this fact is possible in the scenario that choi describes. so it is consistent.

hart
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Apr 2005, 05:50
"C"....Hart's reply doesn't contradict Choi's, so it is consistent with what Choi said.
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Apr 2005, 20:24
Okay, this was a tough one (for me definitely!)

OA is C
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Apr 2005, 20:39
:cry: well ... shud hit myself...but indeed a good question.
  [#permalink] 29 Apr 2005, 20:39
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