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Classical guitar was neither prestigious nor was often

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Classical guitar was neither prestigious nor was often [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2007, 18:25
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A
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C
D
E

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Classical guitar was neither prestigious nor was often played in concert halls until it was revived by Andres Segovia in the mid-twentieth century, having been won over by the instrument's sound despite its relative obscurity.

A. Classical guitar was neither prestigious nor was often played in concert halls until it was revived by Andres Segovia in the mid-twentieth century, having been won over by the instrument's sound despite its relative obscurity.

B. Classical guitar was neither prestigious nor played often in concert halls until it was revived by Andres Segovia in the mid-twentieth century, having been won over by the instrument's sound despite its relative obscurity.

C. Classical guitar was not prestigious and was not often played in concert halls until Andres Segovia revived it in the mid-twentieth century, after he was won over by the sound despite the instrument's relative obscurity.

D. Classical guitar did not have prestige nor was it performed often in concert halls until its revival by Andres Segovia, who in the mid-twentieth century was won over by the instrument's sound despite its relative obscurity.

E. Classical guitar was neither prestigious nor was often played in concert halls until Andres Segovia revived it in the mid-twentieth century, when he was won over by the sound of the relatively obscure instrument.
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Re: SC - Classical guitar [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2007, 18:51
For me the decision was between C and E. I am going for C.

In E, it seems implied that the guitar's revival and Andres Segovia's being won over by it happened exactly at the same time. But that cannot be true.

buckkitty wrote:
Classical guitar was neither prestigious nor was often played in concert halls until it was revived by Andres Segovia in the mid-twentieth century, having been won over by the instrument's sound despite its relative obscurity.

A. Classical guitar was neither prestigious nor was often played in concert halls until it was revived by Andres Segovia in the mid-twentieth century, having been won over by the instrument's sound despite its relative obscurity.

B. Classical guitar was neither prestigious nor played often in concert halls until it was revived by Andres Segovia in the mid-twentieth century, having been won over by the instrument's sound despite its relative obscurity.

C. Classical guitar was not prestigious and was not often played in concert halls until Andres Segovia revived it in the mid-twentieth century, after he was won over by the sound despite the instrument's relative obscurity.

D. Classical guitar did not have prestige nor was it performed often in concert halls until its revival by Andres Segovia, who in the mid-twentieth century was won over by the instrument's sound despite its relative obscurity.

E. Classical guitar was neither prestigious nor was often played in concert halls until Andres Segovia revived it in the mid-twentieth century, when he was won over by the sound of the relatively obscure instrument.
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2007, 19:56
C !
For parallel neither-nor construction.
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2007, 20:12
C as well - E has lame parallelism, all others have lame second part (who was won over).
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2007, 20:26
Classical guitar, having been won over don't go together

C and E remain

In E the correct idiom usage is was neither X nor Y

E has incorrect usage of was neither X nor was Y
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Re: SC - Classical guitar [#permalink] New post 08 Jan 2007, 23:31
I choose C for correct parallelism. "nor was often played" in E sounds wrong to me. I think if it was written as "Classical guitar was neither prestigious nor often played..." it would have been correct. Any thoughts?
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Jan 2007, 00:15
E for me
in C after he was won over by the sound despite the instrument's relative obscurity
sound of what?
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Jan 2007, 04:40
D seems to be the best choice for me :?

Could someone explain to me what the error in it is?
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Re: SC - Classical guitar [#permalink] New post 09 Jan 2007, 05:15
buckkitty wrote:
Classical guitar was neither prestigious nor was often played in concert halls until it was revived by Andres Segovia in the mid-twentieth century, having been won over by the instrument's sound despite its relative obscurity.

A. Classical guitar was neither prestigious nor was often played in concert halls until it was revived by Andres Segovia in the mid-twentieth century, having been won over by the instrument's sound despite its relative obscurity.

B. Classical guitar was neither prestigious nor played often in concert halls until it was revived by Andres Segovia in the mid-twentieth century, having been won over by the instrument's sound despite its relative obscurity.

C. Classical guitar was not prestigious and was not often played in concert halls until Andres Segovia revived it in the mid-twentieth century, after he was won over by the sound despite the instrument's relative obscurity.

D. Classical guitar did not have prestige nor was it performed often in concert halls until its revival by Andres Segovia, who in the mid-twentieth century was won over by the instrument's sound despite its relative obscurity.

E. Classical guitar was neither prestigious nor was often played in concert halls until Andres Segovia revived it in the mid-twentieth century, when he was won over by the sound of the relatively obscure instrument.


was a tough question for me. After seeing explanations I am convinced that answer is C.
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Jan 2007, 06:22
Do you guys think there is a modifier issue here (what comes after the comma)?

So in B:
Classical guitar was neither prestigious nor played often in concert halls until it was revived by Andres Segovia in the mid-twentieth century, having been won over by the instrument's sound despite its relative obscurity.

Is this wrong because the bold portion is modifying the midtwentieth century? and not Andres Segovia? B has the correct neither/nor construction and everything before the comma is ok, so it must be the modifying phrase bolded above. Thoughts?
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Jan 2007, 06:35
A. Modifier problem
B. Modifier problem
C. Correct.
D. Use of nor.
E. ||ism issues.
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Jan 2007, 09:05
Between C and E, I would prefer C....
In E-----"was neither-----nor was" not parallel.
others have modifier problems...
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Jan 2007, 16:17
I think it's "C" also, although GMAT does not like -ing I think "having" appropriately modifies the preceding clause!

What's the OA please?
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Re: SC - Classical guitar [#permalink] New post 09 Jan 2007, 20:54
C is pretty odd but correct. And "after" in C sounds more proper than "when" in E. It should be C.
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 [#permalink] New post 10 Jan 2007, 03:57
Could someone please explain why D is incorrect. This is what hot from the American Heritage Book of English Usage:

Quote:
The rules for using nor are neither simple nor easy to spell out. When using neither in a balanced construction that negates two parts of a sentence, you must use nor, not or, in the second part. Thus you must say He is neither able nor (not or) willing to go. Similarly, you must use nor (not or) when negating the second of two negative independent clauses: He cannot find anyone now, nor does he expect to find anyone in the future. Jane will never compromise with Bill, nor will Bill compromise with Jane. Note that in these constructions nor causes an inversion of the auxiliary verb and the subject (does he … will Bill …). However, when a verb is negated by not or never, and is followed by a negative verb phrase (but not an entire clause), you can use either or or nor: He will not permit the change or (or nor) even consider it. In noun phrases of the type no this or that, or is actually more common than nor: He has no experience or interest (less frequently nor interest) in chemistry.
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 [#permalink] New post 10 Jan 2007, 06:34
khaos wrote:
Could someone please explain why D is incorrect. This is what hot from the American Heritage Book of English Usage:

Quote:
The rules for using nor are neither simple nor easy to spell out. When using neither in a balanced construction that negates two parts of a sentence, you must use nor, not or, in the second part. Thus you must say He is neither able nor (not or) willing to go. Similarly, you must use nor (not or) when negating the second of two negative independent clauses: He cannot find anyone now, nor does he expect to find anyone in the future. Jane will never compromise with Bill, nor will Bill compromise with Jane. Note that in these constructions nor causes an inversion of the auxiliary verb and the subject (does he … will Bill …). However, when a verb is negated by not or never, and is followed by a negative verb phrase (but not an entire clause), you can use either or or nor: He will not permit the change or (or nor) even consider it. In noun phrases of the type no this or that, or is actually more common than nor: He has no experience or interest (less frequently nor interest) in chemistry.


"did not have prestige" and "was it performed" are not parallel. I think "did not have prestige is kind of awkward too when you can just say "was not prestigious"
  [#permalink] 10 Jan 2007, 06:34
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