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Contemporary accounts of the life of Charlemagne, crowned

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Re: Contemporary accounts of the life of Charlemagne, crowned [#permalink]

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New post 28 Apr 2014, 09:43
PiyushK wrote:
which of the following you think is parallel ?
..in the arts and literature Class..
..girls in the arts and the literature classes are hot
...He got a noble in arts and literature..


All the 3 are parallel...It is the context and meaning that matters..
Same applies here too
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Re: Contemporary accounts of the life of Charlemagne, crowned [#permalink]

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New post 05 May 2014, 10:19
Expert's post
hemanthp wrote:
Contemporary accounts of the life of Charlemagne, crowned emperor by the pope in 800, show that the founder of the Carolingian renaissance in literature and the arts was himself an illiterate driven by his desire for a civilized state to reform education in his kingdom.
a) that the founder of the Carolingian renaissance in literature and the arts was himself an illiterate driven by his desire
b) that the founder of the Carolingian renaissance in literature as well as in the arts was himself an illiterate and also driven by his desire
c) that the founder of the Carolingian renaissance in literature and the arts was himself an illiterate and that he was driven by his desire
d) that the founder of the Carolingian renaissance in literature as well as in the arts was himself an illiterate and that he was driven by his desire
e) that the founder of the Carolingian renaissance in literature and the arts was himself an illiterate and that his desire drove him

TooLong150 wrote:
Hi Mike,
Can you explain the difference between A, C, and D in this SC problem; I still don't see how they are different.
Thanks!

Dear TooLong150
I am happy to respond to your p.m. :-)

I'm a big fan of Charlemagne, but this is a poor quality SC question. First of all, the phrase "that the founder of the Carolingian renaissance in literature" is identical in all five answer choices and should NOT be part of the underlined section: this just makes the question unnecessarily confusing. The splits are minuscule, not deeply meaningful. In many ways, this questions falls abysmally short of the high standards set by GMAT SC.

The central revelation of the contemporary accounts that, somewhat ironically, Charlemagne was an illiterate who has this desire to reform education. There's no reason to separate that into to "that" clauses, which is what (C) and (D) do; that's unnecessarily wordy. The phrasing in (A) is more elegant. Furthermore, in (D), there's no reason to say "in literature as well as in the arts" ---- that introduces a funny distinction between them, whereas "literature and the arts" just lumps them together.

In a high quality GMAT SC question, the incorrect answers would not have so little separating them from the OA. If you were confused by this question, don't interpret that as a failing on your part. This is a poor question. Here's a much better question, for practice:
http://gmat.magoosh.com/questions/3597

Mike :-)
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Re: Contemporary accounts of the life of Charlemagne, crowned [#permalink]

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New post 05 May 2014, 19:35
So C and D can be eliminated solely based on wordiness? Do they alter the intended meaning in any way?
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Re: Contemporary accounts of the life of Charlemagne, crowned [#permalink]

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New post 06 May 2014, 13:27
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TooLong150 wrote:
So C and D can be eliminated solely based on wordiness? Do they alter the intended meaning in any way?

Dear TooLong150,
For GMAT purposes, there's no significant change in meaning in (C) & (D). Remember, this is a very poor quality question. Do not take this question as a model. Do not assume that real questions on the GMAT will follow the patterns inherent in this question. Paying attention to the specifics of this question could hurt you more than it helps you.
Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: Contemporary accounts of the life of Charlemagne, crowned [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jun 2014, 13:53
Thumb rule, if option A looks grammatically correct and other choices just do structural changes in sentence like converting a modifier into a clause or replacing and with as well as etc.. then definitely answer is A.

Such conversions changes meaning of sentence.
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Re: Contemporary accounts of the life of Charlemagne, crowned [#permalink]

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New post 27 May 2015, 03:20
daagh wrote:
I look at this question from a different perspective and conclude that A is the correct answer by logic.

The gist of the text is that the emperor was primarily an illiterate; his desire for a civilized state is a derivate and corollary of the primary cause. These two things are not equal in logic; therefore they both can not be used conjunctly by the co-ordinate – and -. C and D suffer this malady of equating two unequal ones.

A brings out this logic perfectly by subjugating the drive to his illiteracy, using the participle driven.

A is a shade better than C and D by logic; the use of - and or as well as – in prepositional structures is inconsequential in the given case and perhaps is a bait to wean away from the crux.



It has to be A...the sentence intends to show comparison...even though he was illiterate, it was his desire...
You cannot use AND as it just shows two qualities.....Sentence logic wise it has to be A.

BUT,

The sentence structure dosent seem correct. It seems like a run on. It should have a comma in between..just my opinion :| :|
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Re: Contemporary accounts of the life of Charlemagne, crowned [#permalink]

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New post 27 May 2015, 10:22
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mango1banana wrote:
It has to be A...the sentence intends to show comparison...even though he was illiterate, it was his desire...
You cannot use AND as it just shows two qualities.....Sentence logic wise it has to be A.

BUT,

The sentence structure dosent seem correct. It seems like a run on. It should have a comma in between..just my opinion :| :|

Dear mango1banana,
I'm happy to respond. :-)

As I have pointed out a few times in this thread, this question is a deeply flawed question. It is not up to the GMAT's standards. This is one of the reasons it generates so much discussion, because it lacks the crisp clarity of a high quality question.

Nevertheless, the sentence in (A), the OA, is not a run-on sentence. It is perfectly correct. Here it is:
Contemporary accounts of the life of Charlemagne, crowned emperor by the pope in 800, show that the founder of the Carolingian renaissance in literature and the arts was himself an illiterate driven by his desire for a civilized state to reform education in his kingdom.
This is not run-on sentence----and by the way, adding a comma does NOT fix a run-on sentence! That's like saying a band-aid fixes a broken bone!!

Here's an article about run-on sentences:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/run-on-sen ... questions/

This sentence in (A) is a long sentence that has several structures nested inside each other. In that sense, the prompt itself is GMAT-like, even though the splits among the answer choices are not GMAT-like. For more on nested structures, see:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2014/nested-gra ... orrection/

Does all this make sense? Please let me know if you have any further questions.

Mike :-)
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Contemporary accounts of the life of Charlemagne, crowned [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jun 2015, 07:51
hemanthp wrote:
Contemporary accounts of the life of Charlemagne, crowned emperor by the pope in 800, show that the founder of the Carolingian renaissance in literature and the arts was himself an illiterate driven by his desire for a civilized state to reform education in his kingdom.
a) that the founder of the Carolingian renaissance in literature and the arts was himself an illiterate driven by his desire
b) that the founder of the Carolingian renaissance in literature as well as in the arts was himself an illiterate and also driven by his desire
c) that the founder of the Carolingian renaissance in literature and the arts was himself an illiterate and that he was driven by his desire
d) that the founder of the Carolingian renaissance in literature as well as in the arts was himself an illiterate and that he was driven by his desire
e) that the founder of the Carolingian renaissance in literature and the arts was himself an illiterate and that his desire drove him


I picked A over C as the final answer. Here is how I approached the Q:
1. "and" vs "as well as"
- both make sense. There is a subtle difference in nuance, however.
AND: treats both components equally. In other words, the magnitude of "literature" and "the art" is completely equivalent.
AS WELL AS: gives the impression that "the art" is somewhat subsidiary to "literature"

2. in literature and the arts vs in literature as well as "in" the arts
- the preposition "in" preceding "the art" is not necessary, but rather is redundant. You don't need to repeat a preposition when it's modifying a noun.
- If, on the other hand, a preposition is a verb-modifier, then we have a different scenario. The second preposition must be repeated.
EX) Jake played the guitar "in the room" and "in the hall".

3. an illiterate driven by desire vs and that he was driven by desire
- again, both cases make sense, but they convey different meanings.
In A, "driven by desire" intends to restrict "illiterate" by giving a specific identification. It's not just an illiterate we are talking about here. We are specifically talking about an illiterate who is driven by desire. This specific identity is lost in choice C.
In addition, choice A seems to suggest that "the ACCOUNTS of C SHOW one fact: that founder was an illiterate driven by his desire.
Choice C seems to suggest that "the ACCOUNTS of C SHOW two facts: that the founder was an illiterate and that he was driven by his desire.
Contemporary accounts of the life of Charlemagne, crowned   [#permalink] 15 Jun 2015, 07:51

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