Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 26 Nov 2014, 07:15

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Contrast

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 30 Jun 2008
Posts: 1048
Followers: 11

Kudos [?]: 301 [0], given: 1

Contrast [#permalink] New post 09 Oct 2008, 07:41
Guys,

What is the difference between contrast to and contrast with ? Is it similar to compare to and compare with ?
_________________

"You have to find it. No one else can find it for you." - Bjorn Borg

Check out my GMAT blog - GMAT Tips and Strategies

1 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 12 Sep 2008
Posts: 25
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 6 [1] , given: 0

Re: Contrast [#permalink] New post 09 Oct 2008, 13:12
1
This post received
KUDOS
I found your question interesting and so I did some research. According to http://www.bartleby.com, there's really no difference beweeen 'contrast to' and 'contrast with' although 'contrast with' is more frequently used.
The noun contrast may be followed by between, with, or to: There is a sharp contrast between his earlier and later works. In contrast with (or less frequently, to) his early works, the later plays are brittle and highly theatrical. When contrast is used as a transitive verb, both with and to may follow, though with is more common: He contrasts the naturalistic early plays with (or to) the brittle later comedies.

here is a link to the source: http://www.bartleby.com/64/C003/076.html

However, there's a sharp distinction between 'compare to' and 'compare with'.
Compare usually takes the preposition to when it refers to the activity of describing the resemblances between unlike things: He compared her to a summer day. Scientists sometimes compare the human brain to a computer. It takes with when it refers to the act of examining two like things in order to discern their similarities or differences: The police compared the forged signature with the original. The committee will have to compare the Senate’s version of the bill with the version that was passed by the House. When compare is used to mean “to liken (one) with another,” with is traditionally held to be the correct preposition: That little bauble is not to be compared with (not to) this enormous jewel. But to is frequently used in this context and is not incorrect.

here is the link to the source: http://www.bartleby.com/64/C003/066.html
VP
VP
User avatar
Joined: 30 Jun 2008
Posts: 1048
Followers: 11

Kudos [?]: 301 [0], given: 1

Re: Contrast [#permalink] New post 09 Oct 2008, 18:01
brandonslee wrote:
I found your question interesting and so I did some research. According to http://www.bartleby.com, there's really no difference beweeen 'contrast to' and 'contrast with' although 'contrast with' is more frequently used.
The noun contrast may be followed by between, with, or to: There is a sharp contrast between his earlier and later works. In contrast with (or less frequently, to) his early works, the later plays are brittle and highly theatrical. When contrast is used as a transitive verb, both with and to may follow, though with is more common: He contrasts the naturalistic early plays with (or to) the brittle later comedies.

here is a link to the source: http://www.bartleby.com/64/C003/076.html

However, there's a sharp distinction between 'compare to' and 'compare with'.
Compare usually takes the preposition to when it refers to the activity of describing the resemblances between unlike things: He compared her to a summer day. Scientists sometimes compare the human brain to a computer. It takes with when it refers to the act of examining two like things in order to discern their similarities or differences: The police compared the forged signature with the original. The committee will have to compare the Senate’s version of the bill with the version that was passed by the House. When compare is used to mean “to liken (one) with another,” with is traditionally held to be the correct preposition: That little bauble is not to be compared with (not to) this enormous jewel. But to is frequently used in this context and is not incorrect.

here is the link to the source: http://www.bartleby.com/64/C003/066.html


Thanks lee +1 for you :)
_________________

"You have to find it. No one else can find it for you." - Bjorn Borg

Check out my GMAT blog - GMAT Tips and Strategies

Re: Contrast   [#permalink] 09 Oct 2008, 18:01
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
2 Experts publish their posts in the topic In Contrast To/ In Contrast With fameatop 6 08 Sep 2013, 04:47
Idiom: in contrast bmwhype2 0 18 Jul 2007, 22:16
2 In contrast to environmentalists proposals to limit Balvinder 11 19 May 2007, 23:39
'contrast' usage drucker_fan 1 23 Dec 2006, 20:11
4 In contrast to true hibernators such as woodchucks and nakib77 13 01 Nov 2005, 13:10
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Contrast

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.