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CR: AIR POLLUTION

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CR: AIR POLLUTION [#permalink] New post 18 Jan 2005, 17:07
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 0 sessions
PLEASE EXPLAIN CORRECT ANSWER CHOICE A! It makes little sense to me.

THANKS!
F.

In the years since the city of London imposed strict air-pollution regulations on local industry, the number of bird species seen in and around London has increased dramatically. Similar air-pollution rules should be imposed in other major cities.
Each of the following is an assumption made in the argument above EXCEPT:
(A) In most major cities, air-pollution problems are caused almost entirely by local industry.
(B) Air-pollution regulations on industry have a significant impact on the quality of the air.
(C) The air-pollution problems of other major cities are basically similar to those once suffered by London.
(D) An increase in the number of bird species in and around a city is desirable.
(E) The increased sightings of bird species in and around London reflect an actual increase in the number of species in the area.
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 [#permalink] New post 18 Jan 2005, 17:41
To me, C seems most reasonable.
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 [#permalink] New post 20 Jan 2005, 04:31
I think it's A.

It need not stress "almost entirely."
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 [#permalink] New post 20 Jan 2005, 05:36
A ! the author doesnt assume that the local industry is "almost entirely" responsible for the air-pollution. it is on major factor of it. if we deny it the conclusion doesnt fall apart. even if the local industy is not almost completely responsible for it, the conclusion is sound.
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My 2 cents... [#permalink] New post 21 Jan 2005, 20:21
The question asks - Each of the following is an assumption made in the argument above "EXCEPT" - so we need to find a response that cannot be linked to the argument presented:

(B) Air-pollution regulations on industry have a significant impact on the quality of the air - can be derived from the stem; otherwise, similar measures may not have been contemplated for other cities.

(C) The air-pollution problems of other major cities are basically similar to those once suffered by London. - possible; otherwise, improvement in London would not encourage thoughts of similar measures in other cities.

(D) An increase in the number of bird species in and around a city is desirable - possible; it could indicate better air quality.

(E) The increased sightings of bird species in and around London reflect an actual increase in the number of species in the area - possible; if they were transit birds, the numbers would not remain high for more than few days.

(A) In most major cities, air-pollution problems are caused almost entirely by local industry. - nowhere does the question stem talk about any source of pollution.

Hope this helps !!
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 [#permalink] New post 21 Jan 2005, 23:33
I agree, (A). The statement isn't based on the assumption that pollution is almost entirely caused by local industries. It only assumes that restriction on local industry would have a great impact on reducing pollution.
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 [#permalink] New post 22 Jan 2005, 13:46
I will go with (D). The increased number of birds is the causal effect of less pollution and not as stated.
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Re: CR: AIR POLLUTION [#permalink] New post 22 Jan 2005, 23:05
Dr_Friedrich wrote:
In the years since the city of London imposed strict air-pollution regulations on local industry, the number of bird species seen in and around London has increased dramatically. Similar air-pollution rules should be imposed in other major cities.


The assumption bt the last two sentences is that more birds are desirable.
Re: CR: AIR POLLUTION   [#permalink] 22 Jan 2005, 23:05
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