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CR - very old but answer not giving anywhere on internet.

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CR - very old but answer not giving anywhere on internet. [#permalink] New post 17 Jun 2013, 06:39
Questions 8-9
Walter: A copy of an artwork should be worth exactly what the original is worth if the two works are visually indistinguishable. After all, if the two works are visually indistinguishable, they have all the same qualities, and if they have all the same qualities, their prices should be equal.
Marissa: How little you understand art! Even if someone could make a perfect copy that is visually indistinguishable from the original, the copy would have a different history and hence not have all the same qualities as the original.
8. Which of the following is a point at issue between Walter and Marissa?
(A) Whether a copy of an artwork could ever be visually indistinguishable from the original
(B) Whether the reproduction of a work of art is ever worth more than the original is worth
(C) Whether a copy of a work of art is ever mistaken for the original
(D) Whether a copy of a work of art could have all the same qualities as the original
(E) Whether originality is the only valuable attribute that a work of art can possess
9. Marissa uses which of the following techniques in attempting to refute Walter’s argument?
(A) Attacking his assumption that the price of an artwork indicates its worth
(B) Raising a point that would undermine one of the claims on which his conclusion is based
(C) Questioning his claim that a perfect copy of a work of art would be visually indistinguishable from the original
(D) Giving reason to believe that Walter is unable to judge the quality of a work of art because of his inadequate understanding of the history of art
(E) Proposing alternative criteria for determining whether two works of art are visually indistinguishable
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Re: CR - very old but answer not giving anywhere on internet. [#permalink] New post 17 Jun 2013, 06:59
GMATCracker22 wrote:
Questions 8-9
Walter: A copy of an artwork should be worth exactly what the original is worth if the two works are visually indistinguishable. After all, if the two works are visually indistinguishable, they have all the same qualities, and if they have all the same qualities, their prices should be equal.
Marissa: How little you understand art! Even if someone could make a perfect copy that is visually indistinguishable from the original, the copy would have a different history and hence not have all the same qualities as the original.
8. Which of the following is a point at issue between Walter and Marissa?
(A) Whether a copy of an artwork could ever be visually indistinguishable from the original
(B) Whether the reproduction of a work of art is ever worth more than the original is worth
(C) Whether a copy of a work of art is ever mistaken for the original
(D) Whether a copy of a work of art could have all the same qualities as the original
(E) Whether originality is the only valuable attribute that a work of art can possess
9. Marissa uses which of the following techniques in attempting to refute Walter’s argument?
(A) Attacking his assumption that the price of an artwork indicates its worth
(B) Raising a point that would undermine one of the claims on which his conclusion is based
(C) Questioning his claim that a perfect copy of a work of art would be visually indistinguishable from the original
(D) Giving reason to believe that Walter is unable to judge the quality of a work of art because of his inadequate understanding of the history of art
(E) Proposing alternative criteria for determining whether two works of art are visually indistinguishable


I feel the answers should be [E] and [B] respectively.

Marissa rejects Walter's claim over the fact of the value of originality. Even if two paintings are virtually indistinguishable, the original is of more value, because it has a rich history with it. Even though all the qualities may match, originality triumphs over them.

Similarly, for the second question, Marissa undermines Walter's conclusion that 'if two paintings resemble each other completely, they should be of same value' using originality. The rest of the choices I feel do not fit the description.

Please correct me if I am wrong! :)

Regards,
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Re: CR - very old but answer not giving anywhere on internet. [#permalink] New post 22 Jun 2013, 20:27
Expert's post
GMATCracker22 wrote:
Questions 8-9
Walter: A copy of an artwork should be worth exactly what the original is worth if the two works are visually indistinguishable. After all, if the two works are visually indistinguishable, they have all the same qualities, and if they have all the same qualities, their prices should be equal.
Marissa: How little you understand art! Even if someone could make a perfect copy that is visually indistinguishable from the original, the copy would have a different history and hence not have all the same qualities as the original.
8. Which of the following is a point at issue between Walter and Marissa?
(A) Whether a copy of an artwork could ever be visually indistinguishable from the original
(B) Whether the reproduction of a work of art is ever worth more than the original is worth
(C) Whether a copy of a work of art is ever mistaken for the original
(D) Whether a copy of a work of art could have all the same qualities as the original
(E) Whether originality is the only valuable attribute that a work of art can possess
9. Marissa uses which of the following techniques in attempting to refute Walter’s argument?
(A) Attacking his assumption that the price of an artwork indicates its worth
(B) Raising a point that would undermine one of the claims on which his conclusion is based
(C) Questioning his claim that a perfect copy of a work of art would be visually indistinguishable from the original
(D) Giving reason to believe that Walter is unable to judge the quality of a work of art because of his inadequate understanding of the history of art
(E) Proposing alternative criteria for determining whether two works of art are visually indistinguishable


See my analysis below...

8)
A - Even though Marissa does cast doubt on the ability of a copy to be visually indistinguishable, the main point is about the underlying qualities, outside visual appearance, of works of art
B - The argument is whether a copy could be worth AS MUCH AS, not more than, the original
C - Not at issue in the argument
D - Correct - The core of the argument is whether a copy can have all the same qualities of the original work of art and therefore have the same value. Walter asserts that visual appearances contain all qualities while Marissa introduces the underlying qualities (i.e. history) which give original works of art different qualities than copies. [Notice how the answer has the same language as the argument with "all the same qualities"…]
E - originality is a term not introduced in the argument (it's a variant of original but the words have different meaning), we are discussing the qualities of original vs. copy

9)
A - Worth is not part of the argument
B - Correct - Marissa's point is that there are other qualities of artwork outside the visual appearance that generate value. This undermines Walter's point that once two works are visually indistinguishable they have ALL the same qualities.
C - Marissa's main purpose is to show that even with a perfect copy the qualities would still be different
D - Marissa is talking about the value of individual artwork when she talks about "history" not Walter's knowledge of the overall "history of art"
E - Marissa is proposing alternative criteria for determining the underlying qualities of artwork, not how to determine their visual similarity

KW
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Re: CR - very old but answer not giving anywhere on internet.   [#permalink] 22 Jun 2013, 20:27
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