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Damaged nerves in the spinal cord do not regenerate

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Damaged nerves in the spinal cord do not regenerate [#permalink] New post 02 May 2013, 11:33
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Damaged nerves in the spinal cord do not regenerate themselves naturally, nor even under the spur of nerve-growth stimulants. The reason, recently discovered, is the presence of nerve-growth inhibitors in the spinal cord. Antibodies that deactivate those inhibitors have now been developed. Clearly, then, nerve repair will be a standard medical procedure in the foreseeable future.

Which of the following, if true, casts the most serious doubt on the accuracy of the prediction above?

(A) Prevention of the regeneration of damaged nerves is merely a by-product of the main function in the human body of the substances inhibiting nerve growth.
(B) Certain nerve-growth stimulants have similar chemical structures to those of the antibodies against nerve-growth inhibitors.
(C) Nerves in the brain are similar to nerves in the spinal cord in their ability to regenerate themselves naturally.
(D) Researchers have been able to stimulate the growth of nerves not located in the spinal cord by using only nerve-growth stimulants.
(E) Deactivating the substances inhibiting nerve growth for an extended period would require a steady supply of antibodies.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Last edited by Zarrolou on 04 May 2013, 03:28, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Damaged nerves in the spinal cord do not regenerate [#permalink] New post 02 May 2013, 13:07
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My take is A

Reason

A) If the prevention of nerve growth is just a by-product, it may disrupt other functions of the body when the anti-bodies were introduced to the body.
Thereby it would cast doubt over the possibility that nerve growth would become a standard procedure. Because this anti-bodies may have other unfavorable side effects.


B) Does not cast any doubt over the claim, because it would mean that there are more ways to encourage nerve growth beside the anti-bodies. Hence it supports the claim, that it will be a standard medical procedure.

C) Does not cast any doubt because the claim was that it will be a standard medical procedure. So this choice is suggesting that even the brain cells can be benefited from the anti-bodies would only increase demands of this procedure.

D) It supports the claim, because it means besides the anti-bodies, there is other means to make nerve repair be a standard medical procedure.

E) Since the question did not state that the anti-bodies are very limited, nor does it state any reason for it to be. This choice does not cast any doubt to the claim that it will be a standard medical procedure.

OA please..
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Re: Damaged nerves in the spinal cord do not regenerate [#permalink] New post 03 May 2013, 10:47
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Re: Damaged nerves in the spinal cord do not regenerate [#permalink] New post 04 May 2013, 03:18
anish123ster wrote:
My take is A

Reason

A) If the prevention of nerve growth is just a by-product, it may disrupt other functions of the body when the anti-bodies were introduced to the body.
Thereby it would cast doubt over the possibility that nerve growth would become a standard procedure. Because this anti-bodies may have other unfavorable side effects.



OA please..



I dont quite get how you came top the conclusion that by introducing antibodies means it would result in side effects.. please elaborate.
Experts any take???

What is wrong with B.

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Re: Damaged nerves in the spinal cord do not regenerate [#permalink] New post 04 May 2013, 03:40
aditya111 wrote:

I dont quite get how you came top the conclusion that by introducing antibodies means it would result in side effects.. please elaborate.
Experts any take???

What is wrong with B.

Thanks


The text basically says that because antibodies that deactivate the inhibitors have now been developed, nerve repair will be a standard medical procedure in the foreseeable future.

We have to look for an answer that casts doubts on this conclusion. An answer that shows some negative effects of the prodedure is the first thing that came into my mind when I read the question.

(A) Prevention of the regeneration of damaged nerves is merely a by-product of the main function in the human body of the substances inhibiting nerve growth.
A shows that there are side effects connected to the prodecdure of deactivating those inhibitors, so this may affects other functions in the organism. It's the correct answer: if the negative effects are greater then the positive ones, the prodedure will not be used.

(B) Certain nerve-growth stimulants have similar chemical structures to those of the antibodies against nerve-growth inhibitors.
This is a bit out of scope and doesn't adress the point. Even if they have a similar structure, does this casts the most serious doubt on the conclusion?
I would say that doesn't affect it...

Does this help?
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Re: Damaged nerves in the spinal cord do not regenerate [#permalink] New post 05 May 2013, 01:23
Zarrolou wrote:
aditya111 wrote:

I dont quite get how you came top the conclusion that by introducing antibodies means it would result in side effects.. please elaborate.
Experts any take???

What is wrong with B.

Thanks


The text basically says that because antibodies that deactivate the inhibitors have now been developed, nerve repair will be a standard medical procedure in the foreseeable future.

We have to look for an answer that casts doubts on this conclusion. An answer that shows some negative effects of the prodedure is the first thing that came into my mind when I read the question.

(A) Prevention of the regeneration of damaged nerves is merely a by-product of the main function in the human body of the substances inhibiting nerve growth.
A shows that there are side effects connected to the prodecdure of deactivating those inhibitors, so this may affects other functions in the organism. It's the correct answer: if the negative effects are greater then the positive ones, the prodedure will not be used.

(B) Certain nerve-growth stimulants have similar chemical structures to those of the antibodies against nerve-growth inhibitors.
This is a bit out of scope and doesn't adress the point. Even if they have a similar structure, does this casts the most serious doubt on the conclusion?
I would say that doesn't affect it...

Does this help?


My take is that both A and B need to take a further step in assuming something or the other in proving themselves right..

What i mean is.. i agree that your statement about B is right. we cannot conclude that antibodies can be ruled out just because they are of the same structure. we need to assume that they also act similarly.

Similarly , for A, we need to assume that by affecting a by-product we would cause side-effects.

your take Zarrolou??

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Re: Damaged nerves in the spinal cord do not regenerate [#permalink] New post 05 May 2013, 10:18
CharuKapoor wrote:
Damaged nerves in the spinal cord do not regenerate themselves naturally, nor even under the spur of nerve-growth stimulants. The reason, recently discovered, is the presence of nerve-growth inhibitors in the spinal cord. Antibodies that deactivate those inhibitors have now been developed. Clearly, then, nerve repair will be a standard medical procedure in the foreseeable future.

Which of the following, if true, casts the most serious doubt on the accuracy of the prediction above?

(A) Prevention of the regeneration of damaged nerves is merely a by-product of the main function in the human body of the substances inhibiting nerve growth.
(B) Certain nerve-growth stimulants have similar chemical structures to those of the antibodies against nerve-growth inhibitors.
(C) Nerves in the brain are similar to nerves in the spinal cord in their ability to regenerate themselves naturally.
(D) Researchers have been able to stimulate the growth of nerves not located in the spinal cord by using only nerve-growth stimulants.
(E) Deactivating the substances inhibiting nerve growth for an extended period would require a steady supply of antibodies.



Reading the above posts seems like there is confusion over Choice (A).
The Question stem says (assumes) - the main function of the inhibitors is to stop the regeneration of the damaged nerves in spinal cords which means even if we deactivate the inhibitors no other harm would be done .Now when we look at option (A) it says that prevention of regeneration of damaged nerves happens as a by product of the main function of inhibitors which contradicts the assumption of question stem which assumes that main function of inhibitors is to stop regeneration . so if we deactivate the inhibitors we might stop its main functioning which may/may not incur some harm , so it casts doubt over the accuracy of the procedure and hence prediction !
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Re: Damaged nerves in the spinal cord do not regenerate [#permalink] New post 05 May 2013, 18:24
I thought this was pretty tricky. I chose A. The argument talks about nerve inhibitors and the recent antibodies that deactivate those inhibitors. However, there is claim at the end about nerve repair becoming a standard procedure. This means that the inhibitors were the only roadblock in the way of nerve repair. So, something that weakens the role of the inhibitors or rather shows them as having relation to something other than the nerve damage can work as an answer.

Damaged nerves in the spinal cord do not regenerate themselves naturally, nor even under the spur of nerve-growth stimulants. The reason, recently discovered, is the presence of nerve-growth inhibitors in the spinal cord. Antibodies that deactivate those inhibitors have now been developed. Clearly, then, nerve repair will be a standard medical procedure in the foreseeable future.

Which of the following, if true, casts the most serious doubt on the accuracy of the prediction above?

(A) Prevention of the regeneration of damaged nerves is merely a by-product of the main function in the human body of the substances inhibiting nerve growth.
This option tries to hint that the inhibitors do more than just the inhibitory functions.

(B) Certain nerve-growth stimulants have similar chemical structures to those of the antibodies against nerve-growth inhibitors.\
This is tangential info. If they have similar cell structures, they might be doing the same function. But the argument already states that the antibodies help to deactivate the inhibitors and thus inidirectly help nerve repair.

(C) Nerves in the brain are similar to nerves in the spinal cord in their ability to regenerate themselves naturally.
Out of scope. We are not talking about the brain at all.

(D) Researchers have been able to stimulate the growth of nerves not located in the spinal cord by using only nerve-growth stimulants.
Out of scope and similar to C.

(E) Deactivating the substances inhibiting nerve growth for an extended period would require a steady supply of antibodies.
This might be a concern. But there is nothing in the stimulus to indicate that antibodies supply is limited.

I feel A is stronger than the others by this reasoning.
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Re: Damaged nerves in the spinal cord do not regenerate [#permalink] New post 12 Apr 2014, 00:37
CharuKapoor wrote:
Damaged nerves in the spinal cord do not regenerate themselves naturally, nor even under the spur of nerve-growth stimulants. The reason, recently discovered, is the presence of nerve-growth inhibitors in the spinal cord. Antibodies that deactivate those inhibitors have now been developed. Clearly, then, nerve repair will be a standard medical procedure in the foreseeable future.

Which of the following, if true, casts the most serious doubt on the accuracy of the prediction above?

(A) Prevention of the regeneration of damaged nerves is merely a by-product of the main function in the human body of the substances inhibiting nerve growth.
(B) Certain nerve-growth stimulants have similar chemical structures to those of the antibodies against nerve-growth inhibitors.
(C) Nerves in the brain are similar to nerves in the spinal cord in their ability to regenerate themselves naturally.
(D) Researchers have been able to stimulate the growth of nerves not located in the spinal cord by using only nerve-growth stimulants.
(E) Deactivating the substances inhibiting nerve growth for an extended period would require a steady supply of antibodies.


(A) Prevention of the regeneration of damaged nerves is merely a by-product of the main function in the human body of the substances inhibiting nerve growth.last man standing :)
(B) Certain nerve-growth stimulants have similar chemical structures to those of the antibodies against nerve-growth inhibitors. we are concerned abt the antiboides and not similar structured nerve growth stimulant
(C) Nerves in the brain are similar to nerves in the spinal cord in their ability to regenerate themselves naturally. we arent concerne abt nerves in brain
(D) Researchers have been able to stimulate the growth of nerves not located in the spinal cord by using only nerve-growth stimulants.we are not concernedabt nerver growth in areas other than spinal cord
(E) Deactivating the substances inhibiting nerve growth for an extended period would require a steady supply of antibodiesdosent weakens,still the antibodies are helpful
Re: Damaged nerves in the spinal cord do not regenerate   [#permalink] 12 Apr 2014, 00:37
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