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Damaged nerves in the spinal cord do not regenerate

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Damaged nerves in the spinal cord do not regenerate [#permalink] New post 10 Sep 2008, 22:34
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Damaged nerves in the spinal cord do not regenerate themselves naturally, nor even under the spur of nerve-growth stimulants. The reason, recently discovered, is the presence of nerve-growth inhibitors in the spinal cord. Antibodies that deactivate those inhibitors have now been developed. Clearly, then, nerve repair will be a standard medical procedure in the foreseeable future.

Which of the following, if true, casts the most serious doubt on the accuracy of the prediction above?

(A) Prevention of the regeneration of damaged nerves is merely a by-product of the main function in the human body of the substances inhibiting nerve growth.
(B) Certain nerve-growth stimulants have similar chemical structures to those of the antibodies against nerve-growth inhibitors.
(C) Nerves in the brain are similar to nerves in the spinal cord in their inability to regenerate themselves naturally.
(D) Researchers have been able to stimulate the growth of nerves not located in the spinal cord by using only nerve-growth stimulants.
(E) Deactivating the substances inhibiting nerve growth for an extended period would require a steady supply of antibodies.
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Re: Zumit CR 006 [#permalink] New post 10 Sep 2008, 22:58
dancinggeometry wrote:
Damaged nerves in the spinal cord do not regenerate themselves naturally, nor even under the spur of nerve-growth stimulants. The reason, recently discovered, is the presence of nerve-growth inhibitors in the spinal cord. Antibodies that deactivate those inhibitors have now been developed. Clearly, then, nerve repair will be a standard medical procedure in the foreseeable future.

Which of the following, if true, casts the most serious doubt on the accuracy of the prediction above?

(A) Prevention of the regeneration of damaged nerves is merely a by-product of the main function in the human body of the substances inhibiting nerve growth.
(B) Certain nerve-growth stimulants have similar chemical structures to those of the antibodies against nerve-growth inhibitors.
(C) Nerves in the brain are similar to nerves in the spinal cord in their inability to regenerate themselves naturally.
(D) Researchers have been able to stimulate the growth of nerves not located in the spinal cord by using only nerve-growth stimulants.
(E) Deactivating the substances inhibiting nerve growth for an extended period would require a steady supply of antibodies.


I choose E as my answer.

Conclusion: nerve repair will be a standard medical procedure in the foreseeable future
Why?: because antibodies that deactivate those inhibitors have now been developed

We want to find an answer that will can suggest that the nerve repair WILL NOT be a standard medical procedure in the future.

(A) Who cares about what's considered the main function of the body. does that tell us anything about the nerve repair? no

(B) Who cares if there are similar chemical structures to those of the antibodies? the bottom line is that the antibodies work. does that help weaken? no

(C) the nerves in the brains are similar to those of the spinal cord? so what?

(D) Although this is a tricky choice, it contradicts the premise mentioned in the argument. The argument said that "Antibodies that deactivate those inhibitors have now been developed." This premise talks about the nerves in the spinal cord. While this answer choice talks about the nerves not located in the spinal cord. This is out of scope.

(E) Correct because it opens the possibility that people may not constantly seek a steady supply of antibodies. The reason this option seems difficult to pick is that is weakens the argument by roughly only 1%. Even if the correct answer choice weakens the argument by a very small margin, it still weakens the argument.

Hope this helps.
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Re: Zumit CR 006 [#permalink] New post 10 Sep 2008, 23:08
dancinggeometry wrote:
Damaged nerves in the spinal cord do not regenerate themselves naturally, nor even under the spur of nerve-growth stimulants. The reason, recently discovered, is the presence of nerve-growth inhibitors in the spinal cord. Antibodies that deactivate those inhibitors have now been developed. Clearly, then, nerve repair will be a standard medical procedure in the foreseeable future.

Which of the following, if true, casts the most serious doubt on the accuracy of the prediction above?

(A) Prevention of the regeneration of damaged nerves is merely a by-product of the main function in the human body of the substances inhibiting nerve growth.
(B) Certain nerve-growth stimulants have similar chemical structures to those of the antibodies against nerve-growth inhibitors.
(C) Nerves in the brain are similar to nerves in the spinal cord in their inability to regenerate themselves naturally.
(D) Researchers have been able to stimulate the growth of nerves not located in the spinal cord by using only nerve-growth stimulants.
(E) Deactivating the substances inhibiting nerve growth for an extended period would require a steady supply of antibodies.



B
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Re: Zumit CR 006 [#permalink] New post 10 Sep 2008, 23:09
Between B & C.

the fallacy in the prediction clearly lies on the fact that the findings on spinal-cord nerves is being generalized for overall nerve repair procedure.

(A)-> states a finding already in the question.
(B)-> Close.similar chemical structures would imply antibodies being ineffective for nerve growth repair. however, we are still left to assume owing to similar chemical structures, damaged nerves develop similar immunity against antibodies.
(C)->Passage talks about nerve-growth inhibitors in spinal cord and developement of antibodies for "these" inhibitors. nerves in brain do not regenerate themselves and might be different issue altogether.
(D)->does not weaken.nerve repair would then imply using nerve growth stimulants for nerves not in the spinal cord and antibodies for those in the spinal cord.
(E)->steady supply is irrelevant to success of procedure.

Will Choose C.
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Re: Zumit CR 006 [#permalink] New post 10 Sep 2008, 23:11
gmatnub
Please expain your answer as B.
confused after tarek99's explanation.. :(
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Re: Zumit CR 006 [#permalink] New post 11 Sep 2008, 02:52
A for me.

If the main function of inhibitor is something else, standard medical procedure will not be available to deactivate it....reason being.....main function of the body will get impacted. However, if the main function of such inhibitors is to stop nerve regeneration, then standard medical procedure will be applicable to deactivate this.
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Re: Zumit CR 006 [#permalink] New post 11 Sep 2008, 05:27
I agree with answer choice A

A - Correct. If the substances inhibiting growth have a main function unrelated to inhibiting growth, it is possible that deactivating them with antibodies causes other problems and cannot be pursued.

B - Close. Not so hot on chemistry, but presumably a similar chemical structure of stimulants could mean that they can attach to nerve growth inhibitors instead of the antibodies? This isn't strong enough for me.

C - Not close. This talks about brain nerve growth and doesn't seem to bear any relation to spinal nerve growth.

D - Not close. In so far as this relates, it could imply that at some point only nerve-growth stimulants would work without antibodies. Even if that were the case, it wouldn't put the prediction into doubt.

E - Close. This would only hurt the prediction if we knew that a providing a steady stream of antibodies is unlikely. It puts things into some doubt, but there are a number of medical techniques for controlled release medication etc. I think A is better.
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Re: Zumit CR 006 [#permalink] New post 11 Sep 2008, 09:52
Little confused with B and D. going with B
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Re: Zumit CR 006 [#permalink] New post 11 Sep 2008, 10:10
I went with B. After reading some explanation, so does E. lol

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Re: Zumit CR 006 [#permalink] New post 11 Sep 2008, 10:27
dancinggeometry wrote:
Damaged nerves in the spinal cord do not regenerate themselves naturally, nor even under the spur of nerve-growth stimulants. The reason, recently discovered, is the presence of nerve-growth inhibitors in the spinal cord. Antibodies that deactivate those inhibitors have now been developed. Clearly, then, nerve repair will be a standard medical procedure in the foreseeable future.

Which of the following, if true, casts the most serious doubt on the accuracy of the prediction above?

(A) Prevention of the regeneration of damaged nerves is merely a by-product of the main function in the human body of the substances inhibiting nerve growth.
(B) Certain nerve-growth stimulants have similar chemical structures to those of the antibodies against nerve-growth inhibitors. -> what if structures are similar,doies not explicitly harm any thing in argument . OUT
(C) Nerves in the brain are similar to nerves in the spinal cord in their inability to regenerate themselves naturally. -> this analogy does not help .we are not bothered about nerves of other parts of body.OUT
(D) Researchers have been able to stimulate the growth of nerves not located in the spinal cord by using only nerve-growth stimulants. -> this talks about expt with other parts nerves.
(E) Deactivating the substances inhibiting nerve growth for an extended period would require a steady supply of antibodies._> this choice is not correct since extended period is not used in the argument,it does not weaken saying that antibodies cannot help regenerating nerves.-> OUT


But to be frank when i cam across this question ,i marked E ,just thinking A cannot be right. But A is correct here :

(A) Prevention of the regeneration of damaged nerves is merely a by-product of the main function in the human body of the substances inhibiting nerve growth.
Clearly says when antibodies are used to deactivate these ,then main functionality of these gets affected ,what if they contribute to some other important task.Hence this sheds a doubt on usage of antibodies for medical; nerve repair.!!!

HTH
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Re: Zumit CR 006 [#permalink] New post 11 Sep 2008, 21:30
I was going to pick (C).
However, after readng through some of the explanations (I cheated) I agree with (A).....

BTW, what is OA?
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Re: Zumit CR 006 [#permalink] New post 11 Sep 2008, 22:05
I choose B. What's d OA?
Re: Zumit CR 006   [#permalink] 11 Sep 2008, 22:05
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